The courses listed under the Missoula College section are those taught exclusively on the Missoula College campuses, however Missoula College also offers lower division courses from the Mountain Campus.

Business Administration

Accounting

  • ACTG 201 - Principles of Fin Acct

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq. or Coreq. M 115, M 121, M 151 or M 162. Introduction to financial accounting concepts, including transactions analysis, financial statement analysis, and corporate financial reporting practices.
  • ACTG 202 - Principles of Mang Acct

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., ACTG 201 and M 115, M 121, M 151 or M 162. Continuation of ACTG 201 with a focus on managerial accounting topics.
  • ACTG 203 - Accounting Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered every term.  Prereq., ACTG 201 with a grade of C or better.  Applying accounting cycle concepts to comprehensive hands-on financial statement cases and/or a practice set and exploring career options.
  • ACTG 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R 3) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., last semester in program, minimum grade of “C” in all ACTG courses, and approval of program director. On-the-job training in positions related to the accounting field. This experience increases students' skills, prepares them for initial employment, and increases occupational awareness and professionalism. Students work a minimum of six hours each week at an approved site and attend scheduled one-hour seminars.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ACTG 305 - Corporate Reporting I

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business, ACTG 201 and 202 with grades of C or better or consent of instr. Prereq., or Coreq., ACTG 203. Topics include concepts in financial accounting, assets and related income statement accounts.
  • ACTG 306 - Corporate Reporting II

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business, ACTG 203, ACTG 305 with grades of C or better, or consent of instr. Continuation of ACTG 305. Topics include concepts in financial accounting, coverage of the liability and equity side of the balance sheet, the cash flow statement, and several special financial accounting topics.
  • ACTG 307 - Corporate Reporting III

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business and ACTG 305; prereq., or coreq., ACTG 306, or consent of instr. Application of accounting principles to complex issues such as post-retirement benefits, accounting changes, bankruptcies, reorganizations, income taxes and other topics.
  • ACTG 321 - Acct Information Systems I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., junior standing in Business. Prereq., or coreq., ACTG 203. Provides thorough understanding of  business processes, risks, and internal controls. Computer applications may be used to demonstrate concepts.
  • ACTG 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ACTG 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • ACTG 394 - Undergraduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • ACTG 401 - Principles of Fed Tax - Ind

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., Junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Prereq., or coreq., ACTG 306. The application of the federal income tax law to determine income, deductions and losses. Special topics include property transactions.
  • ACTG 410 - Cost/Mgmt Acct I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and/or spring. Prereq., junior standing in business or consent of instr. The study of cost management for business and other organizations. Emphasis on how information about costs helps managers make better decisions.
  • ACTG 411 - Auditing I

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, ACTG 321 and  ACTG 306, or consent of instr. Introduction to auditing with emphasis on the independent audit of financial statements. Coverage includes professional standards, ethics, audit risk, evidence, internal controls, procedures, opinions, operational and compliance auditing.
  • ACTG 420 - Cost/Mgmt Acct II

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., senior standing in Business and ACTG 410 or consent of instr. Advanced cost management with emphasis on how financial and non-financial information helps managers make better decisions in a wide variety of business and not-for-profit organizations. Current readings in cost management and related topics.
  • ACTG 425 - State & Local Gov’t Acctg

    Credits: 2. Offered spring.  Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr.  Prereq., or coreq., ACTG 306.  Reporting requirements and generally accepted accounting principles applicable to state and local governmental units.
  • ACTG 426 - Acctg for Nonprofits

    Credits: 1. Offered spring.  Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr.  Prereq., or coreq., ACTG 306.  Reporting requirements and generally accepted accounting principles applicable to nonprofit entities, including colleges/universities.
  • ACTG 432 - Income Tax Practicum

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Service course that provides free tax preparation to low income taxpayers and students, in conjunction with the IRS. Students apply their knowledge of tax law to the preparation and e-filing of income tax returns under the direction of a practicing CPA. Designated as a service learning course.  Graded credit/no credit only.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • ACTG 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ACTG 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of inst.
  • ACTG 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • ACTG 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Students are placed with private or governmental organizations to receive on-the-job training. Written reports are required. A maximum of 3 credits count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ACTG 509 - Financial Rptg & Control

    Credits: 3. Online course. Offered spring.  Prereq., admission to M.B.A. or M-Acct. program or graduate standing with consent of graduate business program director.  Reporting and using financial information of an enterprise, with a focus on internal and external decision-making.  Topics include analysis and recording financial transactions, understanding how these events affect financial statements, and using quantitative tools for internal decision-making. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 605 - Administrative Controls

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn.  Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. program.  Not open to M-Acct. students.  The application of accounting information to managerial and financial decision making. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 615 - Accounting Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, Business core, accounting core, and admission to M-Acct. program or consent of accounting graduate director. A critical analysis of the concepts underlying the development and application of financial accounting in the United States. Coverage of current accounting standards as well as other current topics in financial accounting. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 616 - Adv. Financial Topics

    Credits: 3. Offered fall or spring.  Prerq., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, business core, accounting core, admission to M-Acct. program or consent of accounting graduate director.  Study of financial accounting topics requiring complex treatment, such as accounting for business combinations, consolidations, investments in other entities, and accounting for non-corporate for-profit entities. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 631 - Advanced Tax

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, ACTG 401, admission to M-Acct. program or consent of accounting graduate director. The application of the federal income tax law to corporations and partnerships, and special problems associated with taxation of trusts, estates and gifts. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 632 - Adv Income Tax Prac

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of accounting graduate director and instr. Service course that provides free tax preparation to low income taxpayers and students, in conjunction with the IRS. Graduate students apply their knowledge of tax law to the preparation and e-filing of income tax returns under the direction of a practicing CPA, review the work of undergraduate preparers, and assist in the organization and training of undergraduate preparers. Designated as a service-learning course.  Grade option credit/no credit only. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • ACTG 641 - Advanced Auditing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., admissions to M-Acct., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, ACTG 411, graduate student in business or consent of accounting graduate director. Research cases in auditing and coverage of contemporary topics in auditing, typically including attestation standards, other reports and services, legal and ethical environment, and fraud detection. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 643 - Fraud/Forensic Acct

    Credits: 2 TO 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., admission to M-Acct., with grade of B or better in ACTG 321 and 411 or equivalents, or consent of M-Acct. director.  A study of fraud motivations, techniques, prevention, and detection.  Includes the study of forensic accounting using  forensic science, information security, and other forensic auditing/investigation  tools and techniques, as they apply in various fraud and financial contexts. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 661 - Acct Law & Ethics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, Business core, admission to M-Acct. program or consent of accounting graduate director. Legal issues from the common law and appropriate statutes applicable to the public practice of accounting. The professional responsibilities and ethics of a practicing CPA. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 675 - Contemporary Acct Problems

    Credits: 4. Offered first summer session. Prereq. or coreq., cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in all accounting fundamental courses taken to date, student must be in good academic standing, ACTG 611, 615, 631, 641, and 661. Integration of accounting theory and practice. Primarily for the student preparing to take the uniform CPA examination. Graded only credit/no credit. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 694 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-15) Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director. Selected topics in accounting. Level: Graduate
  • ACTG 696 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director and consent of instr. Directed study of individual or small groups of students in topics not available in scheduled classes. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • ACTG 698 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director and consent of instr. Placements with private or governmental organizations for practical training. Written reports required. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ACTG 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director. Grade option credit/no credit only. Level: Graduate

Business Finance

  • BFIN 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BFIN 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BFIN 205S - Personal Finance

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Concepts, strategies and techniques in analyzing financial situations and investment opportunities from the individual's perspective.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • BFIN 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BFIN 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements within the business community. The student must complete a learning agreement with a faculty member, relating the placement opportunity to his or her field of study. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BFIN 301 - Analysis of Finan Statements

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Analysis of balance sheets, income and cash flow statements and statements of owners' equity in terms of structure, strategy and performance of the company being analyzed. Emphasis is on the use rather than preparation of financial statements.
  • BFIN 322 - Business Finance

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business. The methodology and practice of business financial decisions.
  • BFIN 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BFIN 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BFIN 394 - Undergraduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BFIN 410 - $50,000 Portfolio

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business, grade of C or better in BFIN 322, and consent of department chair. Students manage a diversified investment portfolio for a semester. Students analyze and discuss investment opportunities and implement their decisions.
  • BFIN 420 - Investments

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing in Business, grade of C or better in BFIN 322 or consent of instr. Principles, practices and methodology in investment analysis and portfolio management.
  • BFIN 421 - Real Estate Invtmnt & Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and BFIN 322 with a C or better, or consent of instr. Introduction to the principles and practices of real estate. Includes the study of real estate law, financing, valuation, brokerage and land use.
  • BFIN 424 - Markets, Instns & Fin Enginrng

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, BFIN 322 with C or better and BFIN 429 with C- or better or BFIN 439 with C- or better, or consent of instr. Topics covered include operations and analysis of the national and international money and capital markets as they affect financial institutions and usage of derivatives to hedge risks.
  • BFIN 429 - Fin Mgmt I:Thry/Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, grade of C or better in BFIN 322 and ECNS 202S or consent of instr. Understanding the practice of business investment and working capital decisions. Computer models and cases used to demonstrate the management process.
  • BFIN 439 - Fin Mgmt II: Analysis/Problems

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing in Business, grade of C or better in BFIN 322 and ECNS 202S or consent of instr. Topics include business valuation techniques, capital structure, raising capital, mergers and acquisitions, working capital management, and multinational financial management. Course uses computer models and cases to emphasize analysis and decision making.
  • BFIN 450 - Banking

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, grade of C or better in BFIN 322, or consent of instr. The financial management of banking institutions including financial analysis, interest rate risk management, liquidity management, investment and loan portfolio management.
  • BFIN 473 - Multinational Financial Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing in Business, BFIN 322 and ECNS 202S, or consent of instr. Students are strongly encouraged to complete BGEN 360 prior to BFIN 473. Topics include financial skills required of corporate executives in international business, exchange rate risk analysis, analysis of global financial systems and assessment of real international investments.
  • BFIN 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BFIN 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BFIN 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BFIN 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Students are placed with private or governmental organizations to receive on-the-job training. Written reports are required. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BFIN 522 - Prin Financial Analysis

    Credits: 3. Online course. Offered summer. Prereq., admission to M.B.A. or M-Acct. program or graduate standing with consent of graduate business program director; grade of B or better in ACTG 509. Introduction to financial management and the application of these principles to business decisions. Topics include financial analysis, time value of money, theories of risk and return, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and working capital management. Level: Graduate
  • BFIN 651 - Cornerstone of Grad Fin

    Credits: 1. Offered fall. Course is designed to prepare M-Acct. and MBA students who desire an improved foundation in corporate finance. Level: Graduate
  • BFIN 681 - Financial Management

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or admission to the M-Acct. programs. Advanced theory and analysis in corporate financial management. Level: Graduate
  • BFIN 694 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director. Selected topics in finance. Level: Graduate

Business: General

  • BGEN 445 - Sustainability Reporting

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior, senior, or graduate standing. This course provides students with an understanding of sustainability reporting by organizations. Topics covered include sustainability reporting metrics for the public disclosure of the economic, environmental, and social impacts of organizations. Regulation of sustainability reporting, greenwashing, and external assurance of sustainability reports are also covered.

Business Finance

  • BFIN 267 - Real Estate Theory and Law

    Credits: 4. Offered intermittently through UM Dept. of Continuing Education.  Introduction to the theory and legal issues involved in a real estate transaction.

Business: General

  • BGEN 105S - Introduction to Business

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Nature of business enterprise; role of business in society; problems confronting business management; career opportunities in business. Open to non-business majors and business majors of freshman or sophomore standing only. Business majors are advised to register for the course their freshman year. Credit allowed for only one of BGEN 105S, MIS 100S, IS 100S, BADM 100S and BUS 103S.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • BGEN 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BGEN 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BGEN 361 - Principles of Business Law

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior major or minor in business. This course examines law as it applies to business transactions. Topics include the nature and sources of law; courts and procedure; contracts, employment; Uniform Commercial Code; property; environmental; business organizations; tort liability; insurance; consumer and creditor protection; bankruptcy; criminal law; and agency law. Credit not allowed for more than one of BGEN 235, BGEN 361 and BADM 257.
  • BGEN 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.

Business: Management

  • BMGT 101S - Intro to Entertainment Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Open to non-business majors.  Designed to provide basic distinctions and concepts necessary for understanding various business aspects that underpin the business of entertainment as well as most other businesses, regardless of context.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • BMGT 322 - Operations Management

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., junior major in Business, CSCI 172. A survey of the processes that organizations, public or private, use to produce goods and services. Includes management science topics.
  • BMGT 540 - Mgmt & Legal System

    Credits: 3. Online course. Offered autumn. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs or graduate standing with consent of graduate business program director.  Basic management principles, exploration of concepts such as strategic planning, goal-setting and giving feedback, leadership, motivation, and reward systems. Law as it relates to doing business in the global environment; ethical dimensions of business decision-making. Level: Graduate
  • BMGT 650 - Business Ethics

    Credits: 1. BMGT 650-01 and BMGT 650-60 Business Ethics. 1 credit. Offered in the last five weeks of the fall semester. Prerequisites: admission in MBA program. Business Ethics is a course designed to acquaint students with the ethical implications of business decisions, policy, strategy and operations. The students will learn how to (1) develop a system of ethics that will form the foundation for future ethical practices in business; (2) analyze specific contemporary issues in business for their ethical implications and content; and (3) challenge conventional thinking about ethics by introducing broad-based ethical principles and systems to enlighten and inform ethical thinking. Level: Graduate

Business: Management Info Sys

  • BMIS 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMIS 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMIS 270 - MIS Foundations for Business

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., WRIT 101. Introduces the development, use, and management of computer-based information systems.
  • BMIS 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMIS 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements within the business community. The student must complete a learning agreement with a faculty member, relating the placement opportunity to his or her field of study. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BMIS 326 - Introduction to Data Analytics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., STAT 216 or SOCI 202 or PSYX 222 or FORS 201. This course introduces the terminology and application of big data and data analytics. Students will complete cases in a variety of disciplines as they become acquainted with some of the software, tools, and techniques of data analytics.
  • BMIS 365 - Business App Development

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Provides an understanding of algorithm development, programming, computer concepts and the design and application of data and file structures.
  • BMIS 370 - Managing Information and Data

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business and BMIS 365. Managing and exploiting organizational data and information.  Designing data and information models.
  • BMIS 372 - Information Infrastructures

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Explores the evolution of technological infrastructures with an emphasis on strategic implications.  Students develop an enterprise infrastructure and then examine innovations that allow for the design and development of products and services in a global business environment.
  • BMIS 373 - Business System Analy & Design

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Provides an understanding of the systems development and modification process, including requirements determination, logical design, physical design, test planning, implementation planning and performance evaluation.
  • BMIS 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMIS 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMIS 394 - Undergraduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMIS 465 - Real-Time Data Analytics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., STAT 216, BMIS 365 or equivalents. Focuses on analyzing big data in motion using commercially available software.
  • BMIS 471 - Fund of Netwrk & Security Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing. Current topics will focus on the impact of network technologies and infrastructures on facilitating and supporting business organizations. Students learn about design, installation, and configuration of networks as well as implementing security, networking protocols, and virtualization technologies. Includes a hands-on lab to demonstrate the concepts.
  • BMIS 472 - Adv Network & Security Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing and BMIS 471. Focuses on network security and how it aligns with organizational strategy, directory services for access to organizational information, and cybersecurity management. Includes a hands-on lab to demonstrate the concepts.
  • BMIS 476 - Integrated Project Mgmt for IS

    Credits: 3. Offered every term Prereq., junior standing in Business and BMIS 365, 370, and 373. Emphasis on project planning, team selection models, and project management techniques. A software package is used to demonstrate how projects are planned, managed, monitored, and controlled.
  • BMIS 478 - E Commerce a Managerl Prspctv

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Focuses on the capabilities of the Internet to support and enable commerce. Provides a managerial perspective on topics including effective web site design, emerging technologies, business models, infrastructure architectures, and security.
  • BMIS 479 - Introduction to Consulting

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Managerial approach to consulting engagements. Includes scoping and writing proposals, presenting to clients, documenting consulting work, and interpersonal skills necessary for successful consulting. Course does not require a technical background.
  • BMIS 482 - Big Data Project

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., BMIS 326 and any 2 electives listed in part 4 of the Big Data Analytics Certificate, or consent of instructor. Students will work in cross-disciplinary teams to complete big data projects from different disciplines. There will be emphasis on agile project management.
  • BMIS 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMIS 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMIS 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMIS 495 - Practicum: Information Systems

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Practical hands-on experience with area organizations. Provides application of classroom learning.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BMIS 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BMIS 541 - Systems & Operations

    Credits: 3. Online course. Offered spring. Prereq., admission to M.B.A. or M-Acct. program or graduate standing with consent of graduate business program director; grade of B or better in BMKT 560.  Design and use of information systems to meet the tactical and strategic needs of an enterprise, particularly within the operations function.  Topics include systems analysis, data and process modeling, database designs, manufacturing planning and control, forecasting, and quality management. Level: Graduate
  • BMIS 575 - Fundamentals of Consulting

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing. The technical, interpersonal, and consulting skills necessary to effectively work with clients. Focuses on management; does not require a technical background. Level: Graduate
  • BMIS 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • BMIS 601 - Business Intelligence

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing and BMIS 326. The course provides graduate students with the foundational knowledge necessary to transform big data into useful business intelligence. Students get the skills, tools, and techniques required to collect, synthesize, and distribute information to support intelligent decision-making at the managerial level. Level: Graduate
  • BMIS 625 - Mining of Text & Unstructured Data

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the MS BA program or instructor consent. An integration of Data Science theory and the actual practice of searching, sorting, relating, and deriving results from textual data. Students will be exposed to machine learning, natural language processing, as well as other computer assisted data mining techniques and then gain hands-on proficiency in the practice of data science using the software from data mining and document analysis vendors
  • BMIS 650 - Quantitative Analysis

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs. Quantitative methods supporting managerial decision-making. Theory and logic underlying such methods as linear programming and simulation. Solution of complex problems and practice of interpersonal skills in team projects. Level: Graduate
  • BMIS 674 - Mgmt of Information Systems

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. program. The tactical/operational responsibilities and roles of the CIO. Includes governance issues, supporting the learning organization, managing the technologies, and managing the development of systems. Focuses on management; does not require a technical background. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 694 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director. Selected topics in business. Level: Graduate

Management Info Sys

  • MIS 260 - Life and Health Insurance

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education). Introduction to the principles of life and health insurance as well as the legal and regulatory environment for each industry.
  • MIS 261 - Life Insurance

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education). Introduction to the principles of life insurance as well as the life insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.
  • MIS 262 - Health Insurance

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education). Introduction to the principles of health insurance as well as the health insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.
  • MIS 263 - Property and Casualty Ins.

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education). Introduction to the principles of property insurance as well as the property insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.
  • MIS 264 - Property Insurance

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education). Introduction to the principles of property insurance as well as the property insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.
  • MIS 265 - Casualty Insurance

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education).  Introduction to the principles of casualty insurance as well as the casualty insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.
  • MIS 266 - Personal Lines Insurance

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently through School of Extended and Lifelong Learning (formerly Continuing Education).  Introduction to the principles of personal lines insurance as well as the personal lines insurance industry’s legal and regulatory environment.

Business: General

  • BGEN 220E - Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Focuses on moral judgments, responsibilities to society and their impact on decision making, with particular emphasis on business ethics and values. Addresses organizations and their relationship to the external environment, the law, and various stakeholders.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • BGEN 360 - International Business

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Analysis of business in diverse parts of the globe. Examines the impact of socio-economic, political, legal, educational, and cultural factors on management.
  • BGEN 499 - Strategic Management

    Credits: 3. Prereq., senior standing in Business, COMX 111A, ECNS 202S, BGEN 220E and all business core. Analysis of external and internal firm environment and strategy formulation. Integration of cumulative business knowledge. Case orientation and class discussion.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced

Business: Management

  • BMGT 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMGT 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMGT 205 - Professional Business Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., WRIT 101, COMX 111A. Focuses on understanding the scope and nature of business communication and becoming more fluent and effective writers and speakers in a variety of business situations. Students practice choosing and applying the best communication vehicle and strategy for multiple purposes, audiences, and situations. The course asks students to spend significant time on their own professional writing and presentation skills, and will also survey various contemporary issues in business communication.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • BMGT 275 - Venue Management

    Credits: 3. Offered Autumn. Open to non-business majors.  This course is designed to provide some of the basic tools for better understanding the processes involved in the conceptualization, development and production of live-events and successfully managing various types of venues.  
  • BMGT 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMGT 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMGT 298 - Management Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements within the business community. The student must complete a learning agreement with a faculty member, relating the placement opportunity to his or her field of study. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BMGT 340 - Mgmt & Organization Behavior

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. An intensive examination of the fundamentals of management and organization supported by the application of behavioral science principles to the management of people in organizations.
  • BMGT 375 - Business of Film & Television

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Open to non-business majors. The purpose of this class is to gain a basic understanding of the business elements of film and television production.  This is done through a semester long project and lectures by visiting television and film professionals.
  • BMGT 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMGT 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMGT 394 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMGT 401 - Event Management

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing; open to non-business majors. Students are introduced to skills that are necessary for managing entertainment events. Topics include: market research; artist research; negotiating events; producing live events; and working with community and non-profit organizations. Students will develop and participate in several live events throughout the semester.
  • BMGT 402 - Prin of Entertainment Mgmt I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing and consent of instructor; open to non-business majors. Students are introduced to the fundamental aspects of the entertainment business. Topics include: artist development and management; productions; promotions; and venue management and marketing. Students will produce an artist development plan.
  • BMGT 403 - Prin of Entertainment Mgmt II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing; open to non-business majors. Topics include: tour development and marketing; agency relations and responsibilities; and new forms of entertainment media and distribution. Students will produce an event management plan.
  • BMGT 410 - Sustainable Business Practices

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing. This course explores how changing perceptions around environmental and social issues influence current business practices. Through this exploration, we discuss the impact these influences have on business and how adept firms can gain competitive advantage through embracing and integrating them into their core strategies.
  • BMGT 420 - Leadership and Motivation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business and BMGT 340. Study of fundamental concepts, theories, and models of leadership and motivation. Selected topics include: trait and behavioral theories of leadership, charismatic and transformational leadership, power and influence, emotions and justice perceptions in motivation, expectancy and equity theories.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • BMGT 444 - Management Communications

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business; BMGT 340. This course focuses on four modules managing external and internal communications: Communication of Innovations; Communications with Company Leadership; PR Crisis Communications; and Business Negotiations. Course projects include team research, team oral presentations, individual written executive reports, case studies and analysis, and competitive negotiations.
  • BMGT 448 - Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, BMGT 340, BMKT 325; prereq or coreq., BFIN 322. Focuses on starting and managing a growing business. Topics include recognizing business opportunities, setting strategy for the firm, raising capital, marketing new products, and organizing the managerial team. Students develop a business model canvas and/or write a business plan for themselves or for a local entrepreneur.
  • BMGT 458 - Advanced Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Offered spring. Prereq., BMGT 448. Focus on managing and marketing a growing business, legal and technology issues for entrepreneurs, and financing new ventures. Students refine an existing or write a new business plan and participate in a business plan competition or write case analyses. UM instructors supervise course content delivered by local and regional experts in entrepreneurship. Four separate one credit weekend seminars are offered.
  • BMGT 467 - Global Operations and Supply Chain Management

    Credits: 3. Offered Spring. Prereq., BMGT 322 and BMKT 325, or consent of instructor. The course introduces students to the challenges and opportunities companies face and how they manage the risk associated with the global supply chain. It provides an overview of global supply chain operations management as a field and describes the strategic role it has in today’s intensely competitive business environment.
  • BMGT 474 - Entertainment Rsrch & Planning

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing and consent of instructor; open to non-business majors.  This course will provide students with a better understanding of the processes involved in the conceptualization, development, production and or marketing for businesses, particularly entertainment related entities.  This is done through a variety of real world projects.
  • BMGT 480 - Cross-Cultural Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing in Business. Study of issues related to cultural diversity within the work force and the problems inherent in the management of a firm's activities on an international scale.
  • BMGT 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMGT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMGT 493 - International Experience

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in business. Field-based, experiential courses that focus on international business topics, incl. the culture and business environment of important U.S. trading partners, such as China, Germany, or Italy.
  • BMGT 494 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMGT 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BMGT 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BMGT 604 - Competitive Strategy

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M.Acct. program. An introduction to strategic managment with a focus on the analysis of the firm and its environment as the basis for strategic decision making. Level: Graduate
  • BMGT 640 - Organizational Behavior

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn.  Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs. Professionally oriented strategic overview of intrapersonal, interpersonal, and leadership skills for employees, management, and organizational designers.  Topics include diversity, communication, motivation, groups/teams, culture and structure. Level: Graduate
  • BMGT 665 - Strategic Mgmt Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 12. Offered spring.  Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. program and ACTG 605, BFIN 681, BMIS 574, BMGT 604, and BMGT 640; coreq., MBA 603. Analysis of the firm within its industry and the structure of the industry; competitive positioning and competitor analysis; decision-making under conditions of uncertainty; developing a competitive advantage in international markets. Level: Graduate
  • BMGT 685 - International Business

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs.  Review and analysis of international trade theories and institutions, the role of the multinational enterprise (MNE) in global trade and how the MNEs operate in a global setting. Level: Graduate

Business: Marketing

  • BMKT 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMKT 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMKT 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMKT 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • BMKT 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements within the business community. The student must complete a learning agreement with a faculty member, relating the placement opportunity to his or her field of study. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BMKT 325 - Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business. The marketing environment, product, price, distribution, and promotion strategies including government regulation and marketing ethics.
  • BMKT 337 - Consumer Behavior

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business and BMKT 325; PSYX 100S and 230S recommended. A behavioral analysis of consumer decision making and of the factors influencing consumer decisions, i.e., those decisions directly involved with the obtaining of economic goods and services.
  • BMKT 342 - Marketing Research

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business,  BMKT 325. Emphasis on data acquisition and analysis for improved decision making in marketing. Topics include problem definition; secondary data; primary data via observation, interrogation and experimentation; data analysis; written and oral reports. May include field project.
  • BMKT 343 - Integrated Marketing Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., junior standing in Business, BMKT 325. An integrated course in promotion strategy. Topics include advertising message design, media selection, promotions, public relations, personal selling, and other selected topics.
  • BMKT 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMKT 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMKT 412 - Non Profit Marketing

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and  BMKT 325. Integration of core concepts of marketing into philanthropic and other nonprofit organizations. Includes strategies for large-scale enterprises such as unions, educational and religious institutions to small organizations that provide local support such as cultural services, human and environmental services. Student work with nonprofit organizations creating marketing communications plans in an experiential learning environment.
  • BMKT 413 - Sports Marketing

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  prereq., junior standing in Business,  BMKT 325.  Examines the marketing of sports products and non-sports products using sports as a platform.  Topics include the use of traditional marketing strategies as well as the use of sponsorship strategies including endorsements, venue naming rights, and licensing.
  • BMKT 420 - Integrated Online Marketing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., junior standing in business, BMKT 325. Exploration and application of marketing communications principles to the internet environment. Students develop individual WordPress websites/blogs, learn about online marketing techniques, and complete online marketing and social media projects.
  • BMKT 440 - Marketing Analytics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., BMKT 325; junior standing in Business or consent of instr. The purpose of this course is to learn about the importance and value of using new measurement tools in marketing and using related research and data to create compelling content. Students in this course are also challenged to bring actual ideas to life.
  • BMKT 450 - Marketing Connections

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently, prerequisites: Marketing major, BMKT 325 and 343 and consent of instructor. This is an experiential course offering designed to allow students to apply marketing concepts and strategy to their career/job aspirations. Principles addressed in previous courses are integrated in this class. The concept of marketing strategy will be applied to real-world career development. Students also spend several days meeting business professionals in the region. Upon successful completion of this course each student will have an immediate, actionable plan that will help achieve career aspirations.
  • BMKT 460 - Mktg Hi-Tech Prod & Innov

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., BMKT 325; junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Exploration of concepts and practices related to marketing in fast-paced environment; draws from a range and diversity of industries and contexts including the Internet.
  • BMKT 480 - Marketing Management

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittenly. Prereq., senior standing in Business; BMKT 325, 337, 342, 343. Case analysis in marketing management.
  • BMKT 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business,  BMKT 325. An experiential course in the strategy, research, and execution of an integrated marketing communications plan. Students’ work culminates in the American Association of Advertising’s National Student Advertising Competition.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • BMKT 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMKT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMKT 493 - International Experience

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in business. Field-based, experiential courses that focus on international business topics, incl. the culture and business environment of important U.S. trading partners, such as China, Germany, or Italy.
  • BMKT 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.
  • BMKT 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., junior standing and consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BMKT 560 - Marketing & Stats

    Credits: 3. Online course. Offered autumn. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs or graduate standing with consent of graduate business program director. Introduction to marketing principles to create long-term competitive advantage for an organization. Topics include environmental analysis, marketing planning, segmentation analysis, target marketing, and planning for product, price, promotion and distribution. Business statistics covered including t-tests, analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis; statistics applications in context of marketing research and marketing problems. Level: Graduate
  • BMKT 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BMKT 642 - Advanced Marketing Research

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the MS BA program or instructor consent. The purpose of the course is to learn how to provide information for better business decision making. Students study the different aspects of marketing research as it relates to business problems and develop a mindset that continually relies on information-based decisions. Level: Graduate
  • BMKT 660 - Marketing Management

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. programs. Marketing decisions faced by managers in a variety of business settings including large corporations, small businesses and not-for-profit organizations. Level: Graduate
  • BMKT 670 - Applied Data Analytics

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the MS BA program or instructor consent. This course applies statistical skills and technical expertise to real-world big-data business applications. Students will work with the tools of data science and hone their ability to answer business questions through the analysis of data. Level: Graduate
  • BMKT 680 - Big Data and Innovation

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the MS BA program or instructor consent. The course provides an integrative, capstone experience for students to reflect on and apply the data science tools they have learned in the program. In addition, this course will focus on the innovation and creativity aspects of big data, or how big data can unleash new insights and innovations that solve customer and societal problems. The course will train future managers to think strategically and innovatively—about data, about opportunity, about value. It will ensure that students are proficient in strategy, customer value and insights. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 601 - Career & Leadership Skills

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn during orientation week. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. program. Provides an intensive orientation and introduction to behavioral skills required to excel in the M.B.A. program and one’s business career; structured to create a sense of community among students and faculty and set expectations for future class involvement. Graded only credit/no credit. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 603 - Integrated Project

    Credits: 1. Offered spring.  Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. program; coreq., BMGT 665. This is the capstone course of the MBA program and is offered during the last five weeks of spring semester. Students develop a business plan that requires the incorporation of knowledge from all other core MBA courses. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 645 - Interpersonal Perspectives

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R- 12) Offered every term. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or M-Acct. program. Some classes are open to pre-MBA and pre-M-Acct. students. Selected topics cover leadership theory and practice, ethics in the workplace, and managerial processes such as motivation, communication, conflict resolution, negotiations, team building, critical thinking, goal setting, and building workforce commitment. MBA students must complete at least 2 credits of interpersonal perspective coursework for the MBA degree. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 655 - Technology Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., admission to the M.B.A. or MAcct. programs. Contemporary issues in information technology with emphasis on how technology is used in business organizations. Topics vary each term and may include electronic commerce on the internet, decision support technology, electronic media support, advanced spreadsheet applications, accounting applications and quality control systems. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 692 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director and consent of instr. Directed study of individual or small groups of students in topics not available in scheduled classes. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 695 - Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Practical hands-on experience with area organizations. Provides application of classroom learning. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 696 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director and consent of instr. Directed study of individual or small groups of students in topics not available in scheduled classes. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 698 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director and consent of instr. Placements with private or governmental organizations for practical training in business. Written reports required. Level: Graduate
  • MBA 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate student in business or consent of business graduate director. Level: Graduate

Management

  • MGMT 395 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.

Marketing

  • MKTG 394 - Undergraduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing in Business and consent of instr.

Davidson Honors College

Honors

  • HONR 120 - Introduction to Honors

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Interdisciplinary offerings by various faculty.  Orientation to practical and theoretical issues facing students entering college.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 121L - Ways of Knowing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. A critical assessment of contrasting epistemological stances expressed in various views of the divine, nature, society and the self.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • HONR 122E - Ways of Knowing II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., HONR 121L or LSH 151L or LSH 152L. This course traces the major Western ethical traditions, examines the influence of those traditions in normative political theory, and provides dramatic illustrations of the moral life.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Honors Course
    • Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
  • HONR 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 194 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Prereq., consent of instr. Practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • HONR 270 - Service Learning Seminar

    Credits: 2. Offered Wintersession. This service learning course provides students with an in-depth, week-long community service experience in the West. Students participate in a seminar class prior to service and learn through active reflection and discussion. Students will explore aspects of citizenship and civic responsibility for addressing and solving social problems.  Students explore aspects of citizenship and civic responsibility to address and solve social problems.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 272 - Intro to Civic Leadership

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. This service-learning course provides students with a broad overview of leadership development through engagement with campus and community organizations. Students will examine a variety of leadership models, analyze their own capacity for ethical leadership, and develop a personal leadership philosophy.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 274 - Advocate Leadership Seminar

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., Consent of instr. Members of the university's Advocates are given responsibilities and opportunities generally reserved for paid professionals. This course teaches requisite leadership competencies, skills and articulation. Advocates develop situational decision-making and will be assessed through traditional letter grade and interactive skill evaluation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6)  Prereq., consent of instr.  Practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • HONR 320E - Research Portfolio Seminar

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Designed to assist undergraduate students with their independent research projects, this seminar enables students conducting research in separate disciplines to apply the intellectual strategies and to explore the ethical concerns common to research in most disciplines.  
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 370 - Pre-Law Seminar

    Credits: 1. Offered spring or autumn. This course gives students specific information about the law school application process, the life of a law student, and various careers in the law. Students will have unique opportunities to interact with legal professionals and law school admission officers to explore their futures in law school and the legal profession.
  • HONR 372 - Global Health Issues

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. This course examines the social, cultural, and political aspects of global health issues. Stressing principles of intercultural communication, we will examine the key determinants of public health in developing nations. We will enhance our understanding of the global dimensions of health and disease, the relative effectiveness of various health care initiatives, and the short- and long-term outcomes of diseases and health care interventions.
  • HONR 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Prereq., consent of instr. Practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Internship graduation limit 6
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • HONR 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning
  • HONR 494 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
  • HONR 495 - Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • HONR 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • HONR 499 - Honors Thesis/Project

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Prereq., consent of thesis/project director and dean of Honors College. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Honors Course
    • Service Learning

Library Science

  • LSCI 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • LSCI 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • LSCI 200 - Research Strategies

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Introduces on-campus and distant students to academic library research methods and resources with a focus on remote access and services for distant students. Explores all steps of academic research including how to find information and use critical thinking to evaluate sources.
  • LSCI 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • LSCI 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • LSCI 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LSCI 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Prereq., consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • LSCI 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
  • LSCI 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • LSCI 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
  • LSCI 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LSCI 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Prereq., consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer

Education and Human Sciences

Curriculum and Instruction

  • C&I 160 - Lrng Strat Higher Ed

    Credits: 1 TO 2. Offered autumn and spring. Instruction and application of college study skills including lecture note taking, time management, reading textbooks, test taking, and critical thinking. Elective credit only.
    Course Attributes:
    • Study Skills Course
  • C&I 194 - Freshman Seminar I

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
  • C&I 195 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 5. (R-15) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • C&I 287 - Business Communications

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., WRIT 101 College Writing I. Emphasis on consistent and logical approaches to solving communication problems and creating successful communication products.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • C&I 295 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or current topics.
  • C&I 296 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of advisor and instr.
  • C&I 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of advisor, instructor, and director of field experiences. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • C&I 341 - Information Managemnt & Design

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., CSCI 172.  Emphasis on the development and maintenance of a file management system, application of effective design concepts in the creation of professional print and digital images and documents, and the creation of digital videos for use in education and/or business.
  • C&I 394 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Group analysis of problems in specific areas of education.
  • C&I 395 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • C&I 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of chair. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus.  Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • C&I 501 - Curriculum Design

    Credits: 3. Underlying principles of design, factors affecting implementation, and evaluation and assessment of K-12 curricula at the student and program levels. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 502 - Philosophy of Education

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling, or Curriculum and Instruction. Same as EDLD  502. Major philosophical schools of thought and leading proponents of each. Concepts of society, the educative process, and the role of education. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 504 - Hist of American Education

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 504. Exploration of the ideas, individuals, and events that have influenced the curriculum, pedagogy, and operation of the American public school, from colonial America to the present time. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 506 - Comparative Education

    Credits: 3. How the American educational system compares with those in selected other countries. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 508 - Sociology of Education

    Credits: 3. Modern public education as it affects and is affected by religious, economic, and political systems and other social institutions. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 510 - Dev & Learning Sciences

    Credits: 3. This is an advanced course that addresses application of psychological concepts in educational settings. This course will focus on theories of development, teaching and learning, and on applications of psychological research to learning, primarily to classroom settings. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 514 - Education Across Cultures

    Credits: 3. Educational foundations of the study of diversity in American schools. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 515 - Computer/Tchnlgcl Appl in Educ

    Credits: 3. Prereq., a basic computer course or demonstrated computer literacy. Computer systems and other hardware utilizing various software applications by administrators, counselors, librarians, teachers, and students. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 518 - Inclusion and Collaboration

    Credits: 3. Legal and ethical issues involved in the responsible inclusion of all individuals with disabilities through multi-disciplinary and collaborative efforts. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 519 - Authentic Assessment

    Credits: 3. Focus on assessment practices in K-12 classrooms including a wide variety of assessments that meet curricular objectives as well as nationally required standardized exams to meet NCLB mandates. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 520 - Educational Research

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Same as EDLD 520. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling, or Curriculum and Instruction majors. An understanding of basic quantitative and qualitative research methodology and terminology, particularly as they are used in studies presented in the professional literature. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 521 - Found Environmental Educ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Prereq., graduate standing in environmental studies.  Same as ENST 521.  Problem-solving approach to environmental education; problem identification, research and design and implementation of an educational approach to selected environmental issues. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 523 - Early Childhood Spec. Ed.

    Credits: 3. Focuses on the relationship between assessment and individualized educational planning young children who qualify for Special Education services. A variety of assessments and assessment techniques will be taught, with a strong emphasis on the use of ecologically valid assessment tools.  Emphasis on instructional techniques for young children will be covered with particular attention to the DEC recommended practices.  A field experience is required. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 524 - Family and Diversity Issues

    Credits: 3. An overview of different approaches, current issues, and problems involved in working with and supporting families including families from diverse backgrounds.  Emphasis is placed on how a child with disabilities affects and is affected by parents, siblings, the extended family, and the community.  Strategies for effective communication for the purpose of information sharing and collaborative planning with families are provided. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 525 - Tchg Environmen Science

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered spring even-numbered years.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Same as ENST 525.  Identification and examination of potential solutions to environmental problems and their impact on society.  Major emphasis on teaching methods as they apply to environmental science. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 526 - Transition & Comm Support

    Credits: 3. Focus on issues and strategies for preparing adolescents and young adults with disabilities for the transition from school to future careers.  These issues are discussed within the context of more global efforts to create school-to-career programs in school settings for all students. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 527 - Discip Literacy Strat

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., teaching experience. Advanced theories, models, instructional approaches for using reading/writing for learning in content fields. Emphasis on research, instructional practice, classroom assessment. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 530 - Trends & Rsch in Read and Writ

    Credits: 3. Offered summer odd-numbered years. Survey of current research related to literacy practices in schools/communities. Theories, models, politics of literacy in K-12/Adult education. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 533 - Asmt & Inst for Div Lit Lrnrs

    Credits: 3. Offered summer odd-numbered years. Reading specialist candidates will explore a range of research and current issues related to assessment; develop a framework for assessing students with diverse strengths and learning needs; and practice leveraging information gained from assessments in the design of meaningful learning experiences. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 534 - Foundation and Principles of International Baccalaureate Programs

    Credits: 3. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the foundation and principles of International Baccalaureate Programs. Participants will examine the IB learner profile, the philosophical and pedagogical theories underpinning IB programs, the curriculum framework of the three IB Programs—Primary Years Program (PYP), Middle Years Program (MYP), and Diploma Program (DP), and the role of collaboration and reflection in IB schools. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 535 - Teaching and Learning in International Baccalaureate Programs

    Credits: 3. Prereq., C&I 534 and EDU 202 (for secondary majors) or EDU 395 (for elementary majors). This course explores theory and practice of teaching and learning in IB programs. Participants will study the main learning theories underpinning IB curricular programs, examine examples of lesson plans for each IB program, learn strategies to differentiate instruction, participate in collaborative planning and instructional design, and engage in reflective practices. This course requires a fieldwork experience in IB schools.
  • C&I 536 - Assessment and Learning in International Baccalaureate Programs

    Credits: 3. Prereq., C&I 534 and C&I 535. This course examines the critical role of assessment in IB programs. It addresses both formative and summative assessments as an integral part of the IB curriculum. Participants will learn how to design assessments and create effective feedback strategies based on the learning needs of students. This course requires fieldwork experience in IB schools. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 540 - Lang Arts Ped and Prac

    Credits: 3. Offered summer even-numbered years. Prereq., teaching experience. Advanced theories and instructional approaches for teaching and assessing literacy. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 541 - Genre Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The purpose of this course is to explore, in depth, several literary genres and to move from a survey approach to an intense focus on the variety of books and poems written for children and young adults. Particular attention will be given to research, authors, and awards in each of the following genres: science fiction, historical fiction, contemporary fiction, modern fantasy, non-fiction, graphic novels and poetry Level: Graduate
  • C&I 542 - Superv/Tchg Math

    Credits: 3. Offered summer odd-numbered years. Curriculum trends, instructional materials, research and supervisory techniques relevant to a modern school mathematics program. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 545 - Social Studies Education

    Credits: 3. Historical trends and curriculum issues related to social studies instruction. Emphasis on current research concerning social studies curriculum design, instructional practices, and use of resources. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 548 - Super Tchg Envir Ed

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., ENST 521 or C&I 521.  Design, selection, and evaluation of materials for the teaching of environmental education. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 552 - Models of PD Math/Sci

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even years on-line.  Exploration of various models of professional development and the development of implementation plans for workshops and in-service professional development in science and mathematics. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 555 - Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Special courses experimental in nature dealing with a relatively narrow, specialized topic of particular current interest. Credit not allowed toward a graduate degree. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 556 - Methods Low Incidence Disabil

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and odd summers.  Focus on research-based methods of instruction for students with low incidence disabilities in basic communication, mobility, sensory, and social skills, as well as academic skills (especially literacy and general education curricular access).  An introduction to augmentative and alternative communication and life quality today and in the future.  An introduction to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and assistive technology (AT) is also addressed.  A field experience is required. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 557 - Graduate Literacy Practicum

    Credits: 6. Offered intermittently in summer.  Prereq., C&I 433 or 533. Based on readers’ literacy strengths and needs, practitioners diagnose, devise, and implement instructional strategies for students in grades K-12. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 560 - Response to Intervention

    Credits: 3. Review of evidence-based assessment and instruction techniques in all basic academic areas. Advanced application of general outcome and curriculum-based measures and alignment of these assessments to interventions. Preparation in service as a leader for the implementation of school-wide prevention models. A practicum is required. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 561 - Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education

    Credits: 3. This course provides a broad examination of the historical and philosophical perspectives of education for gifted and talented learners with emphasis on answering the question "What is giftedness?" Issues explored in the course include broad coverage of identification procedures, psychosocial correlates of gifted learners, the nature of intelligence and creativity, instructional options, laws/policies, and current research findings. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 562 - Social and Emotional Development of Gifted and Talented Learners

    Credits: 3. This course provides an overview of current theory and evidence-based practices in understanding the social and emotional development of gifted learners. Topics discussed in class range from research findings addressing social and emotional health and needs of the general population of gifted students to the unique needs of specific sub-groups of gifted students (e.g., gifted girls, gifted and learning disabled, highly creative students, traditionally underrepresented gifted students). Also discussed are guidance, counseling, self-concept and adjustment concerns of gifted students. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 563 - Methods and Curriculum for the Gifted and Talented

    Credits: 3. This is an advanced course in the education of gifted, talented, and creative students which focuses on (1) development of curriculum shown to be effective for gifted learners, and (2) implementation of teaching practices centered on discipline-based knowledge, learning styles, cultural variation, depth and complexity of content, and provisions for case-based, authentic and independent investigation. The purpose of this course is to apply the principles and knowledge obtained in C&I 561 and C&I 562 to the classroom experiences of gifted and talented learners. It is the third course in the Certificate in Gifted and Talented Education series. C&I 561 and C&I 562 are prerequisites for the course. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 564 - Planning Programs for the Gifted and Talented

    Credits: 3. Prereq., C&I 561 and C&I 562.This is an advanced course in the education of gifted, talented, and creative students which addresses program models supported by research, and focuses on the fundamental principles of program design and development for gifted learners. The role of program evaluation and the use of program evaluation models are also stressed. The purpose of this course is to apply the principles and knowledge obtained in C&I 561 and C&I 562 to the classroom experiences of gifted and talented learners. It is the fourth course in the Certificate in Gifted and Talented Education series. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 570 - Instructional Technology Found

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 570. General introduction to the field, theory, and profession of instructional technology. Definition of instructional technology; history of the field. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 571 - Educ Tech Media

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 571. Principles and practices of instructional design for integration of educational technology. Emphasis on role of technology in contemporary teaching/learning/assessing theory and practice, including learning styles and multiple intelligences. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 580 - Dist Lrng Theory & Implem

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 580. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction. Introduction to distance learning models and exploration of satellite and computer-mediated course development, implementation, and evaluation. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 581 - Plng & Mgt for Tech in Edu

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 581. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction. Creating, implementing, maintaining, and evaluating technology plans for educational institutions, including budgets, facilities, and hardware planning.  Level: Graduate
  • C&I 582 - Ed Tech Trends & Issues

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 582. Exploration of trends and issues in the use of educational technology in a variety of settings. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 584 - Authentic App Inst Design

    Credits: 3. Same as EDLD 584. Development of practical competencies in such components of instructional technology as development, production, materials evaluation, and project management and implementation. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 588 - Action Research in Classroom

    Credits: 3. Readings in research in teaching/learning. Strategies to implement all components of an action research project in a classroom including planning/research design, action, reflection, and sharing. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 589 - Professional Project

    Credits: 3. Culminating course in online master's program. Students demonstrate connections across content areas through a mini-thesis, research-based product that is shared with other professionals through a publication and/or presentation at a conference or workshop. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 590 - Supervised Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 594 - Seminar: Prof Portfolio

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-18) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr. Supervised field experience. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 618 - Educational Statistics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., EDU 421 or equiv., or consent of instr. Same as EDLD 583.Same as EDLD 618. Advanced statistical methods and use of the mainframe computer and microcomputer for data analysis. Use of a recognized statistical package (e.g., SPPS-X) for research applications. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 620 - Qualitative Research

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Prereq., C&I 520 or 618, or equiv. Same as EDLD  620. Same as EDLD 583. In-depth review of descriptive, experimental,  historiographic, ethnographic, and other qualitative research methods, designs, and approaches. Includes the development of a research proposal. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 625 - Quantitative Research

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., C&I 520 and 486 or equiv. and coreq., C&I 618. Same as EDLD 583. Same as EDLD  625. Principles and techniques of quantitative research in educational settings. Students prepare a draft of a research proposal and experience an abbreviated dissertation proposal defense. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 630 - Spec Topics in Literacy

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr. Should be taken in conjunction with or immediately prior to comprehensive examinations. In-depth coverage of selected topics in reading and writing related to current literacy issues and practices. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 652 - Issues Curr & Instr

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years.  Prereq., C&I 501 or consent of instr. Curricular and instructional decision making and process, innovation and change, trends and reforms. Controversial issues in education and society related to K-12 curriculum and motivation. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 694 - Adv Sem Curr & Instr

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 697 - Adv Rsrch Curr & Instr

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • C&I 699 - Thesis/Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Early Childhood Education

  • EDEC 230 - Positive Child Guidance and Management with lab

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 and 2. This course examines guidance philosophy and models, universal design, positive guidance techniques, challenging behaviors, functional assessments, and positive support plans. Students will develop skills in using positive guidance and management techniques while enhancing children’s self-esteem and developing children’s pro-social skills. The homework for this class includes application of course content in an early childhood setting. Plan for a minimum of 45 hours in an early childhood setting to accomplish these application activities.
  • EDEC 405 - Early Childhood Assessment and Outcomes

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 and 2. Examines goals, benefits, limitations, characteristics, and uses of assessments for young children, families, staff, and early childhood programs. Explore the relationship between assessment and outcomes, examine and critique different assessment tools and strategies, develop and implement assessment plans, and practice skills in collaboration to form assessment partnerships.
  • EDEC 408 - Early Childhood Principles and Practices

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This course is an overview of principles and practices in early childhood education (ages birth through eight). The main topics to be covered will include: the sociological, professional, and theoretical perspectives of early childhood education with a focus on developmentally appropriate practice (DAP); the skills and dispositions needed in planning and implementing early care and education programs for all children; and education models in early childhood.Students must plan for a minimum of 45 hours in an early childhood setting to meet requirements for the application of course content. Co-convened course with EDEC 508.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 410 - Families, Communities, Culture

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This on-line course explores the dynamics of working together with families of young children (birth - 8) in early childhood programs using a family-centered approach that places the child in the context of family and community. Students will explore developmental relationship building, communication, needs-based assessment and cultural diversity through readings, online discussion groups, an independent service-learning project and field-work. Co-convened with EDEC 510.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 420 - Meeting Standards Through Play-Based Environments

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This course features an in-depth examination of how early learning standards in all content areas (math, science, literacy, technology, physical education, and the arts) can be met through the design and facilitated use of play-based environments. Also examined will be the role of the teacher as environmental designer and facilitator of learning. Students must plan for a minimum of 45 hours in an early childhood setting to meet requirements for the application of course content. This course is co-convened with EDEC 520.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 430 - SocEmot Dvlpmnt in Yng Child

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This on-line course examines the development, components, and influences of social competence in the early childhood years (birth – 8). Positive guidance techniques that enhance children‘s self-esteem and pro-social skills will be taught. Students will examine developmental theories, current literature, researched-based teaching strategies and assessment tools. Students must plan for a minimum of 45 hours in an early childhood setting to meet requirements for the application of course content. Co-convened with EDEC 530.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 453 - Early Childhood STEM

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 4 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1, 2, and 3. This course is designed to address the following questions. How do K-3 students construct science and engineering understandings? Which classroom conditions foster opportunities for students to learn and enjoy science and engineering? What teaching strategies engage students in doing and understanding science and engineering? What does it mean to be a culturally responsive science and engineering teacher?
  • EDEC 454 - PK-3 Language Arts and Reading Methods

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program in early childhood: P-3. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 4 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1, 2, and 3. The emphasis in this course is on integrating the theory, research, and application of the teaching of the facets of communication: reading, writing, listening, speaking, creating, and viewing. The interrelatedness of these skills will be studied in the light of the cognitive development of, and the diversity among, children birth to age eight.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • EDEC 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Special courses experimental in nature dealing with a relatively narrow, specialized topic of particular current interest. Credit not allowed toward a graduate degree.
  • EDEC 495 - EC Fieldwork/Practicum

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. This course provides students the opportunity to participate in planning and facilitating learning activities in a multi-age early childhood program while also participating in an on-line seminar. Students will observe and facilitate learning in a model early childhood setting and participate in on-going written and verbal reflection to explore key teaching and learning issues. The course will focus on promoting student knowledge, skills, and dispositions in the areas of child observation and assessment, curriculum planning, child guidance, and integration of curriculum using a broad repertoire of teaching strategies. Students are required to be based in an approved licensed and/or accredited early childhood program for a minimum of 8 hours/week. Co-convened with EDEC 595.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 508 - Early Childhood Principles and Practices

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. This on-line course presents the foundation principles and practices of early childhood education (ages birth through eight). The main topics to be covered will include: the sociological, professional, and theoretical perspectives of early childhood education with a focus on developmentally appropriate practice (DAP); the skills and dispositions needed in planning and implementing early care and education programs for all children; and education models in early childhood. Students will assume a leadership role in this co-convened course (EDEC 408) to include class presentations of research papers. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 510 - Families, Communities, Culture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. This on-line course explores the dynamics of working together with families of young children (birth - 8) in early childhood programs using a family-centered approach that places the child in the context of family and community. Through readings, online discussion groups, an independent service-learning project, field-work, and creation of a term paper of publishable quality, students will explore developmental relationship building, communication, needs-based assessment and cultural diversity. Co-convened with EDEC 410. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 515 - Early Childhood Professional Working with Families Experiencing Adversity

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. In this course, students will become familiar with the major theories and research regarding family crisis, resiliency, protective factors, and coping skills with an emphasis on the risk factors of poverty, addiction, violence, and disabilities. These will be examined through an early childhood lens and will include the impact of family adversity on early development and learning, the role of early childhood programs in supporting families facing adversity, and an in-depth examination of how the NAEYC Code of Ethics provides guidance in meeting the needs of children and families facing adversity. Students will select and implement an evidence-based family strengthening intervention and evaluate the effectiveness. Level: Graduate
  • EDEC 520 - Meeting Standards Through Play-Based Environments

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. This course features an in-depth examination of how early learning standards in all content areas (math, science, literacy, technology, physical education, and the arts) can be met through the design and facilitated use of play-based environments. Also examined will be the role of the teacher as environmental designer and facilitator of learning. This course is co-convened with EDEC 420. In addition to advanced outcomes and assessment, students enrolled in EDEC 520 will develop and present information at an early childhood conference. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 530 - Social and Emotional Development in Young Children

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. This on-line course examines the development, components, and influences of social competence in the early childhood years (birth – 8). Positive guidance techniques that enhance children‘s self-esteem and pro-social skills will be taught. Students will examine and critique developmental theories, current literature, researched-based teaching strategies and assessment tools. Activities will focus on providing students opportunity to discuss, debate, analyze, and practice key foundations and skills. Students must plan for a minimum of 45 hours in an early childhood setting as well as planning and presenting a training session for parents/families. Co-convened with EDEC 430. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • EDEC 540 - Neuroscience and Its Impact on Child Development

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. This course is an overview of research and methods in developmental cognitive neuroscience, including examination of typical and atypical brain development in the early childhood years. The role of experience, the range of plasticity, and influences such as early intervention will be some of the topics explored specific to early childhood teachers and professionals. Also examined will be neuroscientific claims and whether research supports, contradicts, or does not provide enough evidence to determine the accuracy of the claim. Level: Graduate
  • EDEC 550 - EC Curriculum Analysis, Design, and Assessment

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. This course will examine the underlying principles of curriculum design, implementation, and assessment. Students will complete an in-depth critique of a published early childhood curriculum, determining if the curriculum is evidence based, developmentally and culturally appropriate, comprehensive, aligned with appropriate early learning standards, and if the curriculum can easily be modified to meet the needs of all learners including those who may have special needs. Additionally, students will use a backward design model to create, implement, and assess a curriculum for young children including those who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse. Level: Graduate
  • EDEC 560 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Leadership in ECE

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Participants in this course will critically examine key policy issues facing early childhood and determine ways to engage in and lead others in informed, effective advocacy. The theories, research, and approaches to early care and education advocacy, leadership, and change will be studied and applied through the implementation of an advocacy project. Level: Graduate
  • EDEC 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • EDEC 595 - Early Childhood Fieldwork/Practicum

    Credits: 3. Offered every semester. This course provides students the opportunity to participate in planning, facilitating, and evaluating learning activities in an early childhood setting. Through the fieldwork and on-line seminar, course activities will focus on promoting student inquiry and analysis in the areas of child observation and assessment, curriculum planning, child guidance, and integration of curriculum using a broad repertoire of teaching strategies. Students are required to be based in an approved, accredited early childhood program for a minimum of 8 hours/week where they will video and present a teaching presentation in class. Co-convened with EDEC 495. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course

Education K-12: Special Edu

  • EDSP 401 - Intro Early Intervention

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Restricted to Curriculum & Instruction and Certification majors. This course covers issues relevant to serving very young children and their families. Topics include: ecological systems theory, typical and atypical development, family and child advocacy, naturalist environments, policies and procedures, models of intervention, transdisciplanary service delivery, Individual family service plans, and transition to preschool services. This course requires a 45-hour practicum.
  • EDSP 403 - Curric/Mthds Early Spec Educ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Principles in selecting and adapting early childhood curriculum materials for young children with disabilities; development, implementation and evaluation of individualized education programs; and appropriate teaching strategies for the early childhood special education classroom. Includes a practicum.
  • EDSP 405 - Assess of Students with Excep

    Credits: 3. Focus on a variety of assessment procedures for students who qualify for Special Education services. A variety of assessments and assessment techniques will be taught, with a strong emphasis on the use of ecologically valid assessment tools. Specific measurement skills will be taught including observation skills. Field experience is required.
  • EDSP 426 - Intro Transition & Community

    Credits: 3. Introduction to issues and strategies for preparing adolescents and young adults with disabilities for the transition from school to future careers, post-secondary education, and other post-school environments. These issues are discussed within the context of more global efforts to create school-to-career programs in school settings for all students. A field experience is required.
  • EDSP 454 - Adv Academic Interventions

    Credits: 3. Evidence-based assessment and instruction techniques in all basic academic areas. Particular focus on general outcome and curriculum-based measures and the alignment of these and other assessments to interventions. A field experience is required.
  • EDSP 456 - Intro Mthds Low Incidence Dis

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and odd summers. Introduction to research-based methods of instruction for students with low incidence disabilities in basic communication, mobility, sensory, and social skills, as well as academic skills (especially literacy and general education curricular access). An introduction to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and assistive technology (AT) is also addressed. A field experience is required.
  • EDSP 461 - Positive Behavior Supports

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and odd-numbered summers.  In-depth study of the principles and procedures for managing problem behaviors with an emphasis on prevention and classroom management.  A field experience is required.
  • EDSP 462 - Spec Ed Law, Policy, Practice

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and even-numbered summers.  Historic and current perspectives on laws, policies and practices of the special education and related fields.  Coverage of all aspects of the special education process including collaborative practices.
  • EDSP 495 - Student Teaching: Special Educ

    Credits: 1 TO 10. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., completion of all courses in the special education minor with a grade of B or higher and consent of advisor and Director of Field Experiences. Supervised field experience in special education.

Education-K-12

  • EDU 162 - NCAA Student-Athlete Exp.

    Credits: 1. This course is designed to assist students in the development of necessary skills to be a successful college student-athlete. Topics will include a wide variety of areas including study skills, an introduction to campus resources, and personal and career development. Students will identify and discuss specific issues that pertain to them as student-athletes.
  • EDU 163 - Student-Athlete Success

    Credits: 1. This seminar is designed to assist student-athletes in developing necessary life skills that will help them in their remaining years at the University of Montana. Topics will include a wide variety of areas such as: financial management, nutrition, career development and planning, healthy relationship skills, social responsibility, social etiquette, conflict resolution, and leadership.
  • EDU 202 - Early Field Experience

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to Teacher Education Program in secondary and K-12. Guided introductory field experience for students committed to teaching as a profession. Connects field experience to content of co-requisite theory classes. Seminars include professional development portfolio, developmental level of students, diversity, learning/teaching strategies, motivation, classroom management, and assessment of learning.
  • EDU 212 - Sucessful Education Abroad

    Credits: 1. This course fully prepares students for their education abroad experience. Their health and safety preparations include insurance, safety and education abroad videos, presentations on health care issues abroad and addressing emotional well-being while away from home. The logistical preparations include information and assistance with student visa application process, as well as registration at UM and abroad, credit transfer and billing. The cultural component of the class includes more specifically learning about cultural theories, intercultural communication, cultural adaptation, culture shock and re-entry culture shock as well as panel and small group discussions with former U of M study abroad participants and international students. Student are required to complete five weekly journal entries, interview paper, and final host country research paper. This course also prepares the student to be an ambassador for the University of Montana, while abroad.
  • EDU 221 - Ed Psych & Measuremnt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to Teacher Education program in secondary and K-12. Analysis of fundamental psychological concepts underlying classroom teaching and management, learning and evaluation including educational measurement. Emphasis on cognition, developmental, and motivational aspects of learning.
  • EDU 222 - Educational Psych Child Dev

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary or early childhood: P-3. This course must be taken concurrently with Level 1 courses. This course will examine the classroom practices that impact elementary aged children’s learning, motivation and development. The content is closely aligned with co-requisite courses and initial field experience, allowing opportunities for observation and practice of principles covered in class.
  • EDU 331 - Lit & Literacy for Children

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., WRIT 101; open to majors in elementary education, secondary education or pre-education. Genre survey, including cross-cultural literature, that focuses on responding to children’s literature through reading, writing, listening, speaking, and activities that emphasize selecting literature, teaching critical thinking, and integrating literature into the elementary curriculum.
  • EDU 338 - Academic Interventions

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary or early chiildhood:P-3. This course must be taken concurrently with Level 1 courses. This course prepares pre-service teachers to work with all students including those who are struggling learners and high achievers. The course is focused on school-wide assessment and instruction methods with particular focus on working with individual children and small groups in core academic areas.
  • EDU 339 - Tchg Assess PK-8 Lang Arts

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary education. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 2 courses. Language development and primary and secondary language acquisition, theory and application of teaching and assessing listening, speaking, writing, and viewing in a PK-8 setting.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • EDU 340 - Classroom Management

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Programin elementary edcuation. This course must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Level 1 and 2. This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to set up a classroom, establish classroom policies and procedures and routines, establish and maintain cooperative relationships with parents, effectively provide feedback to students, motivate desired student behavior, and research professional literature to seek best classroom management practices to hone the craft of effective instruction.
  • EDU 345 - Excptnlty & Clsrm Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in secondary and K-12. Focus on classroom management and the characteristics and instructional adaptations for exceptional students in the regular classroom. Addresses the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and subsequent reauthorizations, presents practices for working with students who are at-risk and students with disabilities in inclusive settings, and includes technological considerations.
  • EDU 346 - Exceptionalities

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary or early childhood: P-3. This course must be taken concurrently with Level 2 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Level 1. This course will focus on characteristics and strategies for optimizing learning for children with exceptionalities in the regular education classroom. Addresses the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and subsequent reauthorizations, presents practices for working with students who are at-risk and students with disabilities in inclusive settings, and includes technological considerations.
  • EDU 370 - IntegTech into Educ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program and general computer literacy skills. Integration and use of computer and other technologies in education.
  • EDU 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • EDU 395 - Clinical Experience

    Credits: 1. (R-4) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program. Arranged field experience and seminar focusing on applying content from the co-requisite courses. This course number is used for multiple clinical experiences. Check the class schedule or with your advisor regarding the appropriate section. Elementary Education Majors: EDU 395 Clinical Experience Level 1 must be taken concurrently with Level 1 courses. EDU 395 Clinical Experience Level 2 must be taken concurrently with Level 2 courses. Secondary and K-12 Licensure Students: EDU 395 Clinical Experience K-8 and EDU 395 Clinical Experience 9-12 have a prerequisite of an initial field experience and should be taken concurrently with a secondary or K-12 methods course.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • EDU 397 - Methods: Teaching & Assessing

    Credits: 3. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary or early childhood: P-3. This course number is used for multiple methods courses. Check the class schedule or with your advisor regarding appropriate sections. PK-4 Early Numeracy: Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 1 courses and is restricted to students who have been admitted to the Elementary Education program. Students will learn mathematics concepts, methods of instruction, and the use of instructional materials appropriate for grades K-4 including the use of state and national standards for mathematics, appropriate technology, and manipulatives. Additionally, students will learn techniques for assessing the effectiveness of the counting and cardinality, operations and algebraic thinking, numbers and operations, measurement and data, and geometry. PK-3 Early Literacy: Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 1 courses and is restricted to students who have been admitted to the Elementary Education program. The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of emergent literacy and beginning reading and to examine developmentally appropriate methods of teaching and assessing reading to children in grades K-3.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • EDU 407E - Ethics & Policy Issues

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., admission to Teacher Education Program and EDU 202 or EDU 395. Practical application of ethical principles of the teaching profession. Analysis of the American public school and major policy issues from historical, legal, political, social as well as ethical perspectives.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • EDU 411 - Impl IEFA K-12 Classroom

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. This course is designed to equip educators with the essential skills, knowledge, and cultural awareness to implement Indian Education for All (IEFA) in the k-12 classroom and to assume a leadership role in IEFA programming.
  • EDU 421 - Statistical Procedures in Educ

    Credits: 3. Prereq., M 115 or equiv. or consent of instr. Concepts and procedures characterizing both descriptive and inferential statistics. Awareness of common statistical errors.
  • EDU 432 - Lit & Literacy for Yng Adlts

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Genre surveys; extensive reading, and analyzing of literature, authors and media addressed to students ages 12-18. Emphasizes effective teaching strategies for using high quality literature with middle school and secondary students. Not a substitute for EDU 331.
  • EDU 438 - Ltrcy Asmnt, Diagnosis & Instr

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., EDU 397 or 481 for education students. Based on the analytic process, emphasis on assessing, identifying, and devising instructional strategies to meet students’ reading/writing strengths and needs.
  • EDU 441 - Leadership and Advocacy

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., EDU 397 or EDU 481. Emphasis on teaching writing across the curriculum and supervising the school-wide writing program. Planning, implementing, and assessing writing, and connecting reading and writing will be addressed.
  • EDU 451 - Clinical Exp:L3 Pedagogy Cntnt

    Credits: 1. (R-2) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program in elementary. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 & 2. Arranged field experience in an elementary or middle school classroom completed with Elementary Professional Methods Block.
  • EDU 456 - Applictn of Literacy Modls K12

    Credits: 6. Offered summer. Prereq., EDU 438 or C&I 533. Provides classroom teaching experience under direct supervision. Candidates teach reading and writing and apply knowledge of assessing and correcting reading and writing difficulties in grades K-12.
  • EDU 461 - Introduction to Gifted/Talented Education

    Credits: 3. This course provides a broad examination of the historical and philosophical perspectives of education for gifted and talented learners with emphasis on answering the question "What is giftedness?" Issues explored in the course include broad coverage of identification procedures, psychosocial correlates of gifted learners, the nature of intelligence and creativity, instructional options, laws/policies, and current research findings.
  • EDU 462 - Social and Emotional Development of Gifted and Talented Learners

    Credits: 3. This course provides an overview of current theory and evidence-based practices in understanding the social and emotional development of gifted learners. Topics discussed in class range from research findings addressing social and emotional health and needs of the general population of gifted students to the unique needs of specific sub-groups of gifted students (e.g., gifted girls, gifted and learning disabled, highly creative students, traditionally underrepresented gifted students). Also discussed are guidance, counseling, self-concept and adjustment concerns of gifted students.
  • EDU 472 - Dev Digital Rich Workplace

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSCI 172. Project-based course to gain understanding and the ability to use web development tools to create a functional, well-designed web project. Additional topics/projects include: Web 2.0+ tapping the potential of digital tool; social media—educational and business uses; gamification in education and business, and introductory electronic game development for the classroom and the boardroom.
  • EDU 481 - Content Area Literacy

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Theories, models, instructional approaches for using literacy for learning in content fields. Emphasis on research, instructional practice, classroom assessment, multicultural and discipline integration.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • EDU 491 - Special Topics/Exp Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Special courses experimental in nature dealing with a relatively narrow, specialized topic of particular current interest.  Credit not allowed toward a graduate degree.
  • EDU 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every semester.  Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • EDU 494 - Seminar:Refl Pract & App Rsrch

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Required seminar during student teaching. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program. Focuses on learning to conduct research on P-12 student performance to determine teaching effectiveness. Includes on-campus and/or on-line planning, conducting, and analyzing classroom practice.
  • EDU 495 - Student Teaching

    Credits: 1 TO 14. (R-14) Offered autumn and spring. Arranged capstone clinical experience required for all professional licensure students. Prereq., admission to the Teacher Education Program, completion of all required field experiences and methods courses, an application to student teach, and the consent of the Director of Field Experiences. In addition, elementary education majors must complete all coursework in all previous levels. Secondary and K-12 licensure students must complete at least two-thirds of content coursework and receive approval by departments in their major and minor content areas.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • EDU 497 - Teaching and Assessing

    Credits: 0 TO 4. (R-15) Offered autumn and/or spring. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. This course number is used for multiple elementary and secondary methods courses. Check the class schedule or with your advisor regarding appropriate sections. 5-8 Mathematics: 3 cr. Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 & 2. Methods of teaching, assessing, and evaluating mathematics in the 5-8 middle grades including number and operations, rational numbers, ratio and proportion, measurement, algebra, expressions and equations, geometry, probability, statistics, and functions. K-8 Social Studies: 3 cr. Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 & 2. Emphasis on developing teaching and assessing social studies teaching/learning opportunities that incorporate literature, primary sources and other developmentally appropriate activities. Overarching themes address diversity, integration across the curriculum and understanding state and national curriculum standards. K-8 Science: 3 cr. Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 & 2. Emphasis on developing, teaching, and assessing science teaching/learning opportunities that are inquiry-based, developmentally appropriate, integrated across the curriculum, and aligned with state and national curriculum standards. 4-8 Reading: 3 cr. Offered autumn and spring. This class must be taken concurrently with Level 3 courses and is restricted to students who have completed coursework in Levels 1 & 2. Preparation for teaching reading in a 4-8 setting so that all students are successful. Emphasis on reading to learn. Focus on using assessment to guide instruction, learning from trade books, textbooks, and electronic texts, activating prior knowledge, studying texts, and developing student enthusiasm for reading. 5-12 Science: 3 cr. Offered autumn. Methods of teaching science in the middle and secondary school. This course emphasizes the use of inquiry, problem-solving, appropriate use of technology, and assessment techniques that align with state and national curriculum standards. 5-12 Social Studies: 3 cr. Offered autumn. Foundations and purpose of the middle and secondary social studies curriculum. Elements of curricular design, including instructional methods, materials and assessment. 5-12 Mathematics: 4 cr. Offered autumn. Methods for teaching mathematics in grades 5-12 focusing on presentation of mathematics concepts and procedures through models, problem solving, and technology. Development of instructional strategies and classroom organizational models, discourse in the classroom, and multiple means for assessing student progress. 5-12 Business Subjects: 4 cr. Offered autumn. Methods for teaching business subjects in grades 5-12 focusing on content-specific topics in business, marketing, and information technology to include: instructional planning; effective teaching strategies (F2F & online); multiple means for assessing student progress; classroom management; and the relationship of the content area to standards-based curricula.
  • EDU 607 - Seminar in Ethics

    Credits: 3. The doctoral Seminar in Ethics presents a rigorous examination of the evolution of ethical theory through the lens of pedagogy and curricula. Beginning with religious and philosophical texts from the ancient world, the course moves through the major positions on ethics and moral development in the west. These include the Socratic Method, Virtue Theory, Lockean Pedagogy, the Categorical Imperative, Utilitarianism, Modern Discipline, Democratic Ethics, Moral Reasoning, Feminist Ethics, and Intersubjectivity. These topics will all be accessed through primary source texts. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 611 - Professional Seminar 1: Conducting Literature Reviews

    Credits: 1. Prereq., Admission to PhD program. This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills required to be knowledgeable consumers and effective creators of literature reviews in education and social sciences. Students will critically analyze the multiple components of the literature review in peer-reviewed journal articles relevant to their individual fields of interest, and write a publishable-quality literature review designed to address a question that is not answered in the research related to this field. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 612 - Pro-Sem 2

    Credits: 2. Prereq., Admission to PhD program. This course will prepare students to understand model of field supervision and to carry out effective student teaching supervision. Additionally, students will learn key skills to become high-quality college-level instructors including course planning, pedagogical strategies and evaluation techniques. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 613 - Professional Seminar 3: Grant Writing

    Credits: 1. Prereq., Admission to the PhD program. This course teachers students about the grant writing process. The course will span everything from searching for fundable opportunities that compliment the students' research interests to establishing a research team and community partners to writing an actual proposal. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 616 - Professional Seminar 4: Professional Presentations and Writing for Publication

    Credits: 1. Prereq., Admission to the Ph.D. program. In this course, students will learn how to craft conference presentations and academic papers for publication through discussion and presentation. Students will read and discuss sources on data visualization, academic writing, and presentation through storytelling. Students will also transform academic research that they have done into a conference presentation and manuscript for publication in a scholarly journal. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 617 - Seminar in Policy and Policy Implementation

    Credits: 2. Prereq., Admission to the PhD program. This course is part of a new, proposed Ph.D. program in Teaching and Learning that the Department of Curriculum and Instruction has submitted for the 2015-2016 review cycle. This course is part of the professional seminar series that all Ph.D. students in the program will take to help train them as future faculty. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 621 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods

    Credits: 3. Building on content from CI 620 (Qualitative Methods), this course requires students to deeply explore and apply the most important concepts involved in qualitative research, including: conceptual framework and research design, interviewing and observation, data analysis, and reporting analytic methods and findings. Students will engage directly with qualitative researchers, evaluate published qualitative studies, and apply design, data collection, analysis, and reporting concepts as they work on their own study. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 626 - Mixed Methods Research Design

    Credits: 3. This is an advanced doctoral seminar that aims to provide a comprehensive overview of research design. This overview consists of understanding the preliminary considerations that go into selecting a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research design. These include knowing the definition for these different approaches, considering philosophical worldviews, reviewing the literature, understanding the use of theory, anticipating ethical issues, and developing writing strategies. We will discuss the process of research as it relates to each approach. This process includes writing an introduction, specifying a purpose statement, and developing research questions and/or hypotheses. This course will also discuss the methods and procedures for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 627 - Single Subject Research Designs

    Credits: 3. This is an introductory level course concentrating on single-case designs for educational and therapeutic interventions in applied and clinical settings, data collection and graphing procedures, and visual inspection and inference of data along with statistical analysis. Level: Graduate
  • EDU 628 - Instrument Development for Research and Evaluation

    Credits: 3. The purpose of this course is to explore instrument development as it relates to the social-behavioral sciences. Particular focus will be given to psychological and educational instruments, how tests are developed and how to determine the reliability and validity of instruments. The course explores instrument development as it relates to both research and program evaluation. Models of program evaluation will be explored and students will complete an evaluation of a program using at least one instrument he or she developed. Level: Graduate

Education K-12: Library Media

  • LIBM 461 - Information Literacy

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Instructional techniques for teaching literacy skills, information retrieval, research, and lifelong learning; exploration of how curriculum is designed and how library instruction is integrated into the classroom; collaborative planning, methods of library instruction, and its assessment; development of an integrated unit; and creation of a school research process model.
  • LIBM 462 - Youth Literature for Librarians

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even years and spring even years. Students will develop strategies for presenting fiction and non-fiction literature from the librarian's role as advocate of reading and collaborative co-teacher, encouraging children to cultivate a lifelong proclivity for reading for information and for pleasure; includes a focus on Indian Ed for All.
  • LIBM 464 - Reference Resources

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Evaluation, selection, and use of basic reference resources.  Teaching of media skills, information negotiation, search strategies, database use, and information services.
  • LIBM 466 - Libraries & Technology

    Credits: 3. Offered Summer. Uses of digital technologies in all aspects of library operations, including cataloging and circulation, collection development, reference services, and administration. Level: Undergraduate, Graduate.
  • LIBM 467 - Collection Development & Cataloging

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Students will develop policies and procedures for creating, maintaining and cataloging print and non-print materials in the school library.
  • LIBM 468 - Admin & Assess of Lib Programs

    Credits: 3. Administrating and managing the school library space, materials, budget, and programs. Assessing the library program in terms of effectiveness, instructional collaboration, and district support, using state, regional and national guidelines for library programs and services.
  • LIBM 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Undergraduate, Graduate.
  • LIBM 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • LIBM 495 - Practicum

    Credits: 2. Offered spring and summer. Prerequisite: 16 credits in library and consent of instructor. Supervised field experience in selected phases of library operations, including assessment.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums

Counselor Education

  • COUN 242S - Intimate Relationships

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring semester. This course covers the fascinating, multi-faceted world of intimate relationships and explores the topic from empirical and theoretical perspectives. The examination of intimate relationships in this course will look at the subject through cultural, biological, social and developmental lenses and will explore specific topics such as attraction, communication, friendship, sexuality, love, conflict, power and violence, loss, social cognition, and repairing relationships.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • COUN 395 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • COUN 475 - Forgiveness & Reconcilia

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Survey of the theory and practice of healing fractured relationships at the individual and community levels, treating historical and personal issues from philosophical, psychological and religious perspectives drawn from several diverse cultures.
  • COUN 485 - Counseling Theories

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Prereq., PSYX 100S.  Same as PSYX 442 and SW 485. Introduction to the primary theories that constitute the intellectual foundation for common counseling and psychotherapy techniques, with a special focus on gender, interpersonal influence strategies, and diversity issues.
  • COUN 495 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • COUN 510 - Intro to Counseling

    Credits: 1. Course is designed to prepare school and mental health counselors-in-training gain an understanding of the counseling field and begin developing professional identity.  Much of the material introduced in this course will be developed in greater detail in later courses. This course is an overview that prepares the student for his or her professional identity and activities. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 511 - Theories & Tech of Counseling

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Examination of historic and current theories of counseling.  Overview of techniques associated with each theory.  Basic introduction to ethical concerns with each theory. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 512 - Counseling Fundamentals

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Prereq., COUN 511. Overview of approaches to counseling, including common factors.  Includes meta-theoretical considerations and guided dyadic practice. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 520 - Group Coun & Guidance

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., COUN 511. Theories, approaches, and methods for group counseling and guidance. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 530 - Applied Counseling Skills

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., COUN 511, 512 and consent of instr. Review and application of counseling theories and techniques to client issues.  Intensive supervision including ethics, professional practice and diagnostic considerations.  Lecture and class presentation with a focus on professional counseling development. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 540 - Individual Appraisal

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., C&I 517 or consent of instr. Overview of appraisal techniques utilized in counseling, including interviewing, observation, and psychological/educational testing. The processes of selection, administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting information from appraisal techniques are examined in relation to practical, legal, and ethical considerations. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 550 - Intro Family Counseling

    Credits: 3. Offered summer only.  Prereq., admission to Counselor Education program or consent of instr.  An introduction to the major theories, techniques, and diagnostic tools of family counseling. Course includes a family systems emphasis. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 560 - Lifespan Developmentl Coun

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Overview of counseling from the framework of lifespan developmental theory. Normal and abnormal development in the environmental context of family, school, society and culture emphasized. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 565 - Coun, Prog Dev, & Superv

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Examination of counseling techniques and approaches relevant to prevention and remediation of behavioral, social, emotional and academic problems for students P-12. Overview of school counseling program development and administration. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 566 - Coun Child & Adol

    Credits: 3. Offered every spring. Prereq., COUN 511, 512, 565 or consent of instr.  Review and application of counseling concerns and approaches with children and adolescents in school and related educational settings, including classroom and psychoeducational strategies. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 570 - Career Coun Theory & Tech

    Credits: 3. Offered summer only.  Examination of theories of career choice and development; information sources for career counseling; techniques and approaches of career counseling with clients at different stages of career and life development and from diverse populations. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 575 - Multicultural Coun

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr. An introduction to the field of multicultural counseling.  Issues and practical considerations in counseling five population groups; definition of terms and concepts. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 580 - Addictions Counseling

    Credits: 3. Offered summer. Pre-req., admission to the Counselor Education program or consent of instr. Understanding of addictions with a focus on chemical dependency and its treatment including community and school-based prevention. Course includes Motivational Interviewing approach. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 585 - Coun Meth: School & Agency

    Credits: 1 TO 9. Offered every term. Prereq., COUN 511, 512.  Supervised counseling methods and theories as applied in mental health agencies and schools.  Review of the principles of counseling as these apply to various settings and client issues. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 589 - Comprehensive Project

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring.  Integration of professional experience and academic research in a comprehensive paper or applied project.  Students may elect to have an oral examination covering the eight CACREP core areas of counseling. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. Group analysis of problems in specific areas of professional counseling. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 610 - Profess Ethics/Orient

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., COUN 530 or consent of instr. The public and institutional roles and responsibilities of counseling professionals including ethical and legal responsibilities. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 615 - Diag/Treat Plan in Coun

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., COUN 512. Overview of diagnosis, treatment planning and case documentation in counseling. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 625 - Intro Mental Health Systems

    Credits: 3. Prereq., acceptance into Counselor Education program mental health track.  Essential knowledge for professional identity, understanding of public policy, and community assessment procedures.  Includes brief lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and student presentations. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 630 - Doctoral Clinical Practice

    Credits: 3. Doctoral level clinical experience of 100 supervised hours focusing on the counseling relationship, including case conceptualization and therapeutic skills from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Additional areas of focus are ethical considerations and the assessment of professional counseling outcomes. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 640 - Professional Leadership and Scholarly Development

    Credits: 3. Theories of academic leadership, within professional trends, political and social contexts. Includes developing awareness of scholarly opportunities, including preparation of a professional counseling organization conference proposal. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 650 - Pedagogy and the Professorate

    Credits: 3. Consideration of pedagogy including teaching, learning, governance, curriculum development, assessment and evaluation. Includes knowledge of accreditation processes, personal and professional challenges of faculty life and exploration of doctoral level career paths. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 670 - Doc Comprehensive Exam

    Credits: 2. Students will successfully complete four doctoral Comprehensive Examination Essays read by all members of the student's Doctoral Comps Committee. At least one of the essays is to be submitted for publication. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 685 - Methods Counselor Education

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Supervised advanced counselor education methods and approaches that address the professional leadership roles of counselor education, including realms of teaching and advising, clinical supervision, scholarly work and professional counseling practice. Level: Graduate
  • COUN 699 - Thesis/Profess Paper

    Credits: 2 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., EDLD 620 or 625. Preparation of a thesis, professional paper, or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Biology-Human

  • BIOH 330 - Anat & Phys Speech Mech

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to anat­omy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms including the anatomical orientation and embryological devel­opment, the breathing mechanism, structures of phonation, articulators, audition and the nervous system.

Communicative Sci & Disorders

  • CSD 110 - The Field of CSD

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to the scientific study of human communi­cation and its disorders and to the professions of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.  Overview of biological systems of speech, language, and hearing and the nature and treatment of communication disorders.
  • CSD 131 - American Sign Language I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community, including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical non-manual signals. Focuses on basic expressive and receptive competence.  In addition, the course provides a survey of various issues raised by examining ASL and the Deaf community.
  • CSD 132 - American Sign Language II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 131. ASL II emphasizes further development of receptive and expressive skills; use of signing space; further use of non-manual components of ASL grammar including facial expression and body postures, and introduction to conversational regulators. Discussion of regional and ethnic sign variations, and social, political and educational institutions of the Deaf community. Interaction with members of the Deaf community in both directed and non-directed activities will be featured.
    Course Attributes:
    • Foreign Language Requirement
  • CSD 194 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
  • CSD 210 - Speech & Lang Devel

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Sophomore standing or greater. Topics include typical speech and language development, phonology, semantic, morphological, syntax, and pragmatics, along with individual differences, second language acquisition and literacy.
  • CSD 221N - Fundamentals of Acoustics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Provides students with a basic and working knowledge of acoustics and the physics of sound.  Provides the basis for measurement and description of speech stimuli.  Direct application to Speech Hearing and Language intervention as well as application into communicative sciences.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • CSD 222 - Intro to Audiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to prin­ciples of acoustics as a basis for understanding hearing assess­ment.  Development of ability to interpret audiograms as well as the results from a hearing evaluation.  Includes pure tone and speech audiometry, acoustic immittance and reflex test­ing.  Hearing screening procedures are also included.
  • CSD 320 - Phono Devel & Phonetics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Junior standing or higher. Exploration of the sounds and sound structure of American English and some of its dialects. Introduction to the theory and practice of phonetic and phonological analysis and trained in the transcription of speech into the International Phonetic Alphabet. 
  • CSD 345 - Developmental Speech & Language Disorders

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 210, CSD 320. Nature of developmental speech and language disorders and basic understanding of principles underlying assessment and treatment of these disorders.
  • CSD 365 - Acquired Speech and Language Disorders

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 210. Identification, assessment, and intervention for a variety acquired speech and language disorders. Other topics include secondary conditions, potential psychosocial and educational concerns, multicultural considerations, and family roles.
  • CSD 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • CSD 405 - The Clinical Process

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 210, CSD 222, CSD 320, CSD 345, CSD 365. The underlying principles of clinical methods and practice including: the observation of human behavior and clinical processes, assessment of communication differences, clinical management of these differences, delays and disorders, behavior, interviewing/counseling, lesson planning, and writing skills.
  • CSD 411 - Neuroanatomy & Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq.,BIOH 330. Focused study on the anatomy of the nervous system and how the nervous system supports behaviors inherent to communication. Students will be introduced to anatomical terms, structures, and functions. Clinical implications will be discussed as well.
  • CSD 420 - Speech Science

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 222, CSD 320, BIOH 330. Physiologic, neurologic, and acoustic aspects of human communication, theoretical framework for speech science, and principles of acoustics applied to speech pathology.
  • CSD 430 - Senior Capstone

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., senior status. Part one of a two course sequence where the student completes an independent project. Students will prepare a literature review, and ethics application, and a proposal in preparation for a major research project of their design.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • CSD 450 - Intro to Aural Rehabilitation

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSD 210, CSD 222, CSD 345, & CSD 365 or graduate standing. Fundamental skills in speech reading, various types of hearing aids, and the tools necessary to assess and implement auditory training. Management of the client with hearing impairment including psycho-social development and educational intervention. Both children and adults are included.
  • CSD 480 - Multicultural Issues

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CSD 210, CSD 222, CSD 320, CSD 340, CSD 360.  Topics include: dynamics of community and culture; strategies to communicate with people from a variety of backgrounds; learning English as a second language; phonological and linguistic analysis of differences between Standard English speakers and culturally diverse populations and international differences in service delivery.
  • CSD 490 - Undergrad Clin Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 3. 1-3 cr. (per semester). Prereq., lower division CSD courses and consent of CSD Clinical Director. A maximum of 5 credits of clinical practicum may count toward graduation. Allows the advanced student an opportunity to pursue independent or small group clinical practicum. Students will be directly supervised by a certified speech and language pathologist or audiologist.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSD 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CSD 496 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-8) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • CSD 498 - Independent Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered Autumn, Spring.  Prereq., consent of the instructor.  Participation in independent or instructor associated research activities.  
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSD 520 - Artic & Phono Disorders

    Credits: 3. Offered Autumn. Prereq., Graduate standing and CSD 320, CSD 330, CSD 340 or equivalent course work. Theoretical perspectives on phonological and articulation disorders with emphasis on application to clinical management including evaluation, assessment techniques, and intervention strategies. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 530 - Voice & Motor Speech Dis

    Credits: 4. Prereq., Graduate standing, CSD 330, 340, and 411, or equivalent course work. Study of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of voice. Diagnosis and management of voice and resonance disorders. Neural bases of normal and disordered speech motor control. Assessment and treatment of motor speech disorders. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 540 - Fluency Disorders

    Credits: 3. Offered Autumn. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and CSD 340 or equivalent course work.  Theoretical, etiological, and developmental perspectives of fluency disorders.  Principals of assessment and intervention, including integration of fluency shaping and stuttering modification techniques. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 545 - Augmentative & Alt. Comm.

    Credits: 3. Offered variable terms.  Prereqs., graduate standing.  Topics include: AAC terminology, design and use of multiple AAC devices (high and light tech), and implementation of treatment programs for individuals and communication partners. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 550 - Lang/Learn Dis.Yng Chld SERV

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., Graduate standing and CSD 210 and CSD 360 or equivalent course work. Theoretical perspectives, research, and clinical issues concerning disorders of language in infants, toddlers and preschoolers considering contributing factors, special populations and basic assessment and intervention principles.  Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning
  • CSD 560 - Lang/Learn Dis.Schl Age SERV

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing and CSD 210 and CSD 360 or equivalent course work.  Theoretical perspectives, research, and clinical issues concerning disorders of language, literacy, and learning in the school-age population (elementary through high school) considering contributing factors, special populations and basic assessment and intervention principles. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning
  • CSD 565 - Aphasia & Acq. Apraxia

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOH 330, CSD 210, and CSD 411 or equivalent course work and graduate standing. Neural bases and medical etiologies of acquired apraxia of speech and acquired cognitive-linguistic disorders in adults. Evaluation and treatment of aphasia and apraxia of speech in persons with acquired neurologic disorders across successive stages of recovery. Incorporates models of rehabilitation across prevention, assessment, and treatment, with a focus on the WHO ICF and aspects of disability across diverse populations. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 566 - Acquired Cog-Com Disorders

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., Graduate standing, CSD 565 or equivalent course work. Assessment, treatment, and prevention of acquired cognitive-communication disorders including pediatric and adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), right hemisphere syndrome (RHS), and dementia. Emphasis on neurobiological principles of rehabilitations, differential diagnosis and theories, and evidence-based research pertaining to clinical management. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 570 - Clinical Procedures I

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn, summer; on campus only.  Prereq., graduate standing, permission of clinical director. Co-convened with CSD 571. Study of professional and clinical issues with application to clinical practicum. Discussions, demonstrations, and student presentations. Mandatory weekly meeting. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSD 571 - Applied Clinic I

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn, summer; on campus only. Prereq., graduate standing, permission of clinical director. Co-convened with CSD 570. Application of professional skills in the UM RiteCare Clinic. Assignment of cases and area of specialization will vary with the clients needs and availability. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSD 575 - Clinical Procedures II

    Credits: 1. (R-9) Offered autumn, spring, summer. Prereq., CSD 570. Co-convened with CSD 576. Advanced study of professional and clinical issues with application to clinical practicum. Discussions, demonstrations, and student presentations. Mandatory synchronous weekly class meeting. Out of state placement by approval of clinical director. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSD 576 - Applied Clinic II

    Credits: 2. (R-9) Offered autumn, spring, summer. Prereq., CSD 570. Co-convened with CSD 575. Advanced application of professional skills in the UM RiteCare Clinic or off-campus. Assignment of cases and area of specialization will vary with the clients needs and availability. Out of state placement by approval of clinical director. Level: Graduate.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSD 580 - Diagnostics

    Credits: 2. Offered every term. Prereq., Graduate Standing and CSD 570. Students will accrue clinical clock hours with pediatric and adult populations while developing the following skills: using case history information to form a diagnostic plan; administering various standardized and non-standardized diagnostic tools; interpreting assessment results; writing diagnostic reports; and sharing diagnostic results with clients, caregivers and other professionals. Mandatory weekly class meetings. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 594 - Graduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-3) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offering of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 600 - Research Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing. Research methodologies appropriate for quantitative and qualitative studies in communication sciences and disorders. Focuses on critical reading of research papers, design, and implementation of experiments. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 640 - Swallowing Disorders

    Credits: 3. Prereq, Graduate standing and CSD 330, CSD 340, and CSD 411, or equivalent course work. Study of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of swallowing.  Diagnosis and treatment of swallowing disorders. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 675 - Clinical Externship

    Credits: 6. Offered every term. Prereq., permissions of Clinic Director and completion of at least 4 credits of CSD 575 clinical course work.  The course is an externship typically completed during a student’s final semester of graduate school.  The externship requires a commitment of 30-40 hours a week in a school, clinic, or medical site across Montana or out of state that is approved by The University of Montana.  Online case study is also required to fulfill requirements. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 688 - CSD Master of Science Capstone

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and autumn. Prereq., CSD 600, Graduate standing and consent of instructor. In depth literature review of a particular field of study related to speech-language pathology. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 696 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 5. Prereq. Consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • CSD 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Offered autumn, spring, summer. Prereq., CSD 600, Graduate standing and consent of instructor. The primary purpose of the thesis is to allow a student to conduct a research project in a particular field of study related to speech and language pathology. Level: Graduate

Educational Leadership

  • EDLD 295 - Special Topics in Ed Amin

    Credits: 1 TO 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors.Offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • EDLD 495 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • EDLD 502 - Philosophy of Education

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I 502. Major philosophical schools of thought and leading proponents of each.  Concepts of society, the educative process, and the role of education. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 512 - Educational Futures

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Predicting and projecting the near and more distant future of education.  The changing place and nature of education and leadership in tomorrow's society. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 519 - Analysis of Ed Data

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Explanation and practice in measurement and statistical analysis of educational data.  Preparation in measurement and statistical analysis for educational research. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 520 - Educational Research

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I and HHP 520. An understanding of basic quantitative and qualitative research methodology and terminology, particularly as they are used in studies presented in the professional literature. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 540 - Higher Education Finance

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Overview of how colleges and universities make financial and budgetary decisions; current trends in state and federal policy related to finance; contemporary problems in finance of education. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 542 - The College Student

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Survey of today’s college student including discussion of demographics, student development theories, learning theories, and contemporary issues on college campuses related to college students. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 544 - The College Curriculum

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Historical and contemporary development of college and university curriculum.  Includes overview of pedagogical strategies, assessment, evaluation, and curricular change. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 546 - Fed & State Higher Ed Pol

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Overview of policies at the local, state, and national levels that affect the conduct of higher education; current trends in higher education policy; changes in educational policy; how policies affect different institutional types. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 550 - Found Educational Leadersh

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Basic functions of K-12 administration and supervision and how contemporary views have evolved; models of leadership style and practice compared; responsibilities and relationships of school boards and chief school officers. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 551 - Found Curric Leadership

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. The history and theoretical bases of current K-12 curriculum and instructional leadership. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 552 - Sup Eval Pub Sch Educators

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Conflicting views and models of supervision; supervision in relation to administration and evaluation. Development of instruments for the formative and summative evaluation of teaching and their use in simulated cases. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 554 - School Law

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Key Montana and national legislation regarding public education. Landmark cases of the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal, regional, and state courts as they affect the operation of public schools and the rights of school board members, administrators, teachers, students, and parents. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 556 - Finance of Publ Education

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Revenue sources for K-12 public schools; proper expenditures; Montana's foundation program and related legislation; major court cases and how they have affected ways of funding schools; developing effective school and district budgets. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 559 - School Pub Rel-Prins

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Investigation of the appropriate leadership and management roles of the modern school principal as they relate to public relations.  Understanding of political theory as it relates to developing and maintaining relationships with internal and external publics. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 567 - K-12 Leadership

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Examination of the roles responsibilities, and relationships of educators relative to management and leadership considerations at all levels of the educational organization (elementary, middle, secondary, and central office). Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 568 - K-12 Curriculum

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Major aspects of curriculum related to the duties and responsibilities of school administrators.  Issues related to the development, review and evaluation o curriculum.  Exploration of issues related to selected instructional models and practices; school improvement. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 583 - Strategic Plng For Tech

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I 583. Leadership and strategic planning processes for technology integration within schools. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 585 - Fieldwork Ed Admin & Super

    Credits: 2 TO 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Fieldwork at the school level (when the student is not completing an internship), with the cooperation of the principal and under the guidance of a University of Montana professor. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Group analysis of problems in specific areas of education. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-10) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Consent of instructor. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-10) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Consent of instructor. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Consent of instructor. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 618 - Educational Statistics

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I 618. Advanced statistical methods and use of the mainframe computer and microcomputer for data analysis.  Use of a recognized statistical package for research applications. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 620 - Qualitative Research

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I 620. In-depth review of qualitative research methods, designs, and approaches. The development of a research proposal. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 625 - Quantitative Research

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Same as C&I 625. Principles and technique of quantitative research in educational settings. Students prepare a draft of a research proposal and experience an abbreviated dissertation proposal defense. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 653 - School Personnel Admin

    Credits: 3. Prepreq., consent of instructor required. Administration of classified and certificated school employees; personnel-related laws, functions, and decisions; unions, bargaining contracts, grievances, etc. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 656 - The Economics of Education

    Credits: 3. Prepreq., consent of instructor required. School finance from a national perspective; alternative budgeting and school-revenue models; equity considerations. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 657 - Facil Plng/Schl Bus Func

    Credits: 3. Prepreq., consent of instructor required. Working with architects, school personnel, and others on educationally and financially sound plans for new and remodeled facilities; the school business official's responsibilities regarding buildings and grounds, maintenance and custodial services, transportation, food services, and the administration of classified personnel. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 658 - School Pub Rel-Supts

    Credits: 3. Prepreq., consent of instructor required. Enhancing site- and district-level internal and external relations; conducting needs assessments, inservice workshops, and funding campaigns; improving administrators' writing, listening, and speaking skills; composing press releases and newsletters; working with the media. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 660 - Adult Continuing Education

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Adult learning theory and the special needs and motivations of adult learners in postsecondary institutions; principles and practices of administering postsecondary continuing education programs. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 662 - History of Higher Educ

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Survey of the historical roots of higher education from world and comparative perspectives; examination of the historic and contemporary missions, organizational structures, governance, and administration of various types of postsecondary and higher education institutions in America and abroad. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 664 - The Community College

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. The organization and administration of American postsecondary education in two-year collegiate institutions; current trends in governance, finance, curriculum, faculty and students. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 667 - American College Professor

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Investigation of the prevailing curriculum and instruction in American undergraduate and graduate education and consideration of reform reports. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 668 - College & University Admin

    Credits: 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Administration of college and university programs, departments, and schools; the roles of program director or coordinator, department chairperson, dean, vice president, provost, president, chancellor, and commissioner. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 670 - Best Practices in IPL

    Credits: 3. Students explore the field of International Programs at the college or university level and seek current best practices. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the leadership and management activities required of leaders in the field of international programs. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 672 - Itnl Prog Dev

    Credits: 3. This course prepares professionals with the knowledge and practical skills needed to develop programs, seek external funding, and write proposals to support student and professional exchanges, study abroad, ESL and intensive language programs, internships, student services, partnership agreements, and other education and training activities in the international field. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 673 - Lead./Cultures

    Credits: 3. The course introduces a methodology to support the emerging field of international and comparative educational leadership and management and is instrumental for students of educational leadership and management. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 674 - Internship in College Tchg

    Credits: 1 TO 3. Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Provides an opportunity for guided and supervised teaching at the college level and assistance to the aspiring college teacher in meeting the needs of a diverse student population; assistance provided in methods of teaching at the college level, theories of learning, use of technology, and evaluation and assessment techniques. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 676 - Internship Higher Ed Admin

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Supervised and guided work in an administrative unit/department at the college/university level. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 677 - Globalization in Education

    Credits: 3. Course explores globalization of education from the perspective of International Programs at the post-secondary level. This course is designed to prepare students for leadership positions in the field of International Programs and other related fields. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 678 - Cultural Proficiency

    Credits: 3. Course explores the area of cultural proficiency through a variety of lenses. Students use interviews and self-reflection to develop a framework for understanding cultural issues and ethical approaches cultural issues. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 679 - Linguistic Diversity

    Credits: 3. Course explores policy issues related to linguistic diversity. This course is designed to help students develop a framework of global issues as they relate to, and are impacted by, linguistic diversity. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 680 - Pol./Int.l Ed.

    Credits: 3. Course explores political issues related to International Programs. This course is designed to prepare students for the dynamic nature of political arena surrounding the development and implementation of postsecondary International Programs. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 681 - Comp. Int.l Ed.

    Credits: 3. Course explores the field of international programs at the college or university level through a study of comparative education. This course is designed to familiarize students with the similarities and differences between educational systems across the globe. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 682 - Cross-Cultural Competence

    Credits: 3. Blending both the practical and theoretical, this course offers you the requisite knowledge, the appropriate motivations, and the relevant skills to function competently with culturally-different others. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 683 - Int.l Persp.

    Credits: 3. This course primarily focuses on international students sharing their perspectives (including international academics and experienced practitioners). Topics include adaptation challenges, and the role that international students and faculty play in broader internationalization and diversity agendas within US higher education. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 694 - Adv Sem: Ed Admin/Superv

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 697 - Adv Research Ed Ad Super

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • EDLD 699 - Prof Sem/Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Open to graduate level students in Education Leadership, Counseling or Curriculum and Instruction majors. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate

Global Youth Development

  • GYD 495 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • GYD 501 - Intercultural Dev't -I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Explorations of child rearing practices, parenting beliefs, and cultural variations in infancy and early child development. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 502 - Intercultural Dev't -II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Explorations of cultural variations in later childhood, adolescence and adulthood, with particular focus on issues such as multicultural adoption, identity, and the role of poverty. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 510 - Intercultural Skills

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Focus on applied skills in two areas: crosscultural negotiation and conflict management; program development and grant writing. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 520 - Critical Issues

    Credits: 3. Exploration of psychological, political, spiritual, ethical, and practical dimensions of offering assistance cross-culturally. This course includes discussion of ethical and personal issues related to intercultural work, gender and development, trauma, program evaluation, etc. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Directed readings and other individualized study topics guided by faculty. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Introduction to service learning in applied settings, usually local. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 599 - Professional Projects

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-2) Offered every term. Final Master's project related to internship; may be presented as a grant proposal, policy analysis, or portfolio. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 695 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-4) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 698 - Intercultural Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-4) Offered every term. Supervised intercultural experience through Peace Corps, VISTA, or other organization approved by program faculty. Level: Graduate
  • GYD 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-2) Offered every term. Final master's thesis based on research related to internship placement. Level: Graduate

Activities

  • ACT 103 - Jump Rope Fitness and Skill

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 105 - Aerobic Fitness

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 106 - Beg Conditioning and Fitness

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 107 - Beginning Aerobic Dance

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 109 - Beginning Racquetball

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 110 - Beginning Weight Training

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in activity courses (ACT 100-287) in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 112 - Curling

    Credits: 1. (R-4) Students will learn the curling rules, scoring, etiquette, basic strategies, methods and styles of stone deliver. In addition, how to "read' the ice/call for sweeping, most effective sweeping techniques, and the different positions on a curling team will be taught.
  • ACT 113 - Beginning Softball

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 114 - Beginning Rock Climbing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 115 - Soccer

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 118 - Hockey

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 119 - Beginning Nordic Skiing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 129 - Circuit Training

    Credits: 1. (R-4) Upon completing this course, the student will be able to develop their strength, endurance, and flexibility by participating in various fitness programs or sports, demonstrate proper form and skills for various fitness programs, and recognize and demonstrate appropriate fitness etiquette.
  • ACT 136 - Aerial Yoga

    Credits: 1. (R-4) This course teaches traditional Hatha yoga with an aerial hammock, aiding the student in postures. In order to accumulate a person who is new to yoga, the aerial hammock offers the body assistance to find correct alignment and decompression of the spine without pressure on the head or hands.
  • ACT 140 - Beginning Basketball

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 143 - Beginning Table Tennis

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 144 - Horse

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 145 - Beginning Dodgeball

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 146 - Beginning Golf

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 150 - Beginning Yoga

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 151 - Beginning Billiards

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 152 - Beginning Handball

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 154 - Beginning Tai Qi

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 157 - Beginning Martial Arts

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
  • ACT 163 - 5/10 K Race Training

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
  • ACT 164 - Triathlon Training

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 167 - Mountain Biking

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 169 - Beginning Tennis

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 171 - Physical Fitness I

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 172 - Physical Fitness II

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 173 - Beg Fly Fishing/Fly Tying

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 174 - Introduction to Backpacking

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 175 - Fly Fishing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 176 - Fnd of Whitewater Rafting

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 177 - Fundamentals of Kayaking

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 178 - Canoeing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 179 - Basic Canoeing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 185 - Multicultural Games

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 186 - Firefighter Conditioning

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
  • ACT 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ACT 202 - Intermediate Racquetball

    Credits: 1. An intermediate course for the sport of racquetball. Students should have a fundamental understanding of the sport, including the rules of the game and its variations, and the necessary equipment. Intermediate-level instruction will focus more on stroke mechanics, and strategies. Students will also be learning the enjoyment of playing racquetball, which is a game that can last a lifetime.
  • ACT 207 - WC Aerobics

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 215 - AMGA Climbing Wall Instructor

    Credits: 1. This course will address the technical skills necessary to manage an instructional program at an indoor climbing wall facility and will address the following general topic areas: instructor roles, responsibilities and professionalism, client orientation and instruction, risk management, lesson planning, teaching basic climbing skills, including movement, teaching lead climbing skills, teaching top-rope and lead belaying techniques, use of available equipment and facility, basic rescue and emergency procedures.
  • ACT 218 - Ultimate Disc

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 219 - Folf

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 222 - Ski Camp

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 225 - Snow Bowl Ski Area

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 228 - Ski Instructor's Preparation

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Open to all students with advanced to expert skiing skills. Techniques of teaching skiing including: skill concepts and contemporary skiing movements; teaching cycle; movement analysis; personal skiing improvement. Prepares student for certification with (PSIA) Professional Ski Instructors of America.
  • ACT 229 - Snowboard Instructor Prep

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Open to students with advanced to expert riding skills. Techniques of teaching snowboarding including: skill concepts and contemporary snowboarding movements; teaching cycle; movement analysis; personal riding improvement. Prepares student for certification with (ASSI) American Association of Snowboard Instructors.
  • ACT 231 - Pilates - Yoga Fusion

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 232 - Alpine Core Studio

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 233 - Freestone Climbing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. This course is a free climb, no ropes course. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 234 - Jazz for Fun & Fitness

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 235 - Belly Dancing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 237 - Trampoline Arial Acrobatics

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 250 - Pilates

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 257 - Martial Arts and Self Defense

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 258 - CFM Mixed Martial Arts

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
  • ACT 259 - AAK American Kenpo

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 271 - Swimming for Fitness

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 274 - Scuba Diving

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
  • ACT 286 - Fencing

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 287 - Strength & Flexibility

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • ACT 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or current topics.
  • ACT 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of advisor and instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ACT 337 - Aquatic Certifications

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-4) Offered spring. Prereq., HHP 238 or equivalent certifications. Offered on a rotating basis. Training for Water Safety Instructor, Lifeguard Training Instructor, or Adapted Aquatics Instructor. Red Cross Instructor's Certificate awarded upon successful completion of requirements.
  • ACT 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ACT 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the background and objectives of the student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • ACT 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ACT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ACT 494 - Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Special courses experimental in nature dealing with a relatively narrow, specialized topic of particular current interest. Credit not allowed toward a graduate degree.
  • ACT 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121 (or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 335.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • ACT 499 - Capstone

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R 6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent work under the University omnibus option. See index.
    Course Attributes:
    • Omnibus Course

Activities - Varsity

  • ACTV 189 - Varsity Athletics

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course

Allied Hlth: Athletic Training

  • AHAT 210 - Prev and Care Athletic Injur

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and Spring (winter session). Coreq., AHAT 213. Development of knowledge of prevention, assessment, treatment, rehabilitation, emergency care of athletic injuries.
  • AHAT 213 - Prev and Care Athletic Injur L

    Credits: 1. Coreq., AHAT 210. Development of practical skills in prevention, assessment, treatment, rehabilitation, and emergency care of athletic injuries.
  • AHAT 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of advisor and instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • AHAT 324 - Assessment of the Extremities

    Credits: 2. Coreq., AHAT 325. The study and practice of techniques used when assessing athletic injuries to the upper and lower extremities, including the spine.
  • AHAT 325 - Assessment of Exremities Lab

    Credits: 1. Coreq., AHAT 324. The study and practice of techniques used when assessing athletic injuries to upper and lower extremities including the spine.
  • AHAT 342 - Therapeutic Interventions

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., WRIT 121 or 201. Theories and application methods of interventions such as therapeutic modalities and exercise for athletic injuries. Substantial reading and writing component.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • AHAT 343 - Therapeutic Interventions Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Coreq., AHAT 342. Laboratory sessions examining theories and application methods of interventions such as therapeutic modalities and exercise for athletic injuries.
  • AHAT 479 - Topics in Sports Medicine

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., Junior standing or higher. The etiology and management of sports related injuries/illnesses. Includes: therapeutic use of drugs, pre-participation screening techniques, ergogenic aids, the aging athlete, the sports medicine team concept and current medical treatment of sports injuries.
  • AHAT 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
  • AHAT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • AHAT 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121 (or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 335.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6

Athletic Training

  • ATEP 534 - Techniques Athletic Training I

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Serves as an introduction to athletic training practice. Emphasis on the prevention, care, and management of acute injuries and illnesses, as well as risk management, environmental concerns, and protective taping and equipment. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 535 - Athletic Training Techniques II

    Credits: 3. Provides an investigation into the study of evidence based medicine, epidemiology and injury surveillance, cultural competency, and mental health issues. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 540 - Practicum Athletic Training I

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Builds on skills previously acquired and introduces new skills related to current coursework. Students will be assigned to a clinical education rotation under the direct supervision of a clinical preceptor. First in the series of four practicum courses. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 541 - Practicum Athletic Training II

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Expands on skills previously acquired and introduces new skills related to current coursework. Students will be assigned to a clinical education rotation under the direct supervision of a clinical preceptor. Second in the series of four practicum courses. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 542 - Lower Extremity Assessment

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Provides a study of anatomy and physiology, assessment, evaluation techniques, treatment, and management of conditions affecting the lower extremities and lumbar spine. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 544 - Upper Extremity Assessment

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Provides a study of anatomy and physiology, assessment, evaluation techniques, treatment, and management of conditions affecting the upper extremities, head, and thoracic and cervical spine. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 546 - General Medical Assessment

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Examines the recognition, assessment, and management of general medical conditions and illnesses. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 550 - Pract in AT III

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Broadens skills previously acquired and introduces new skills related to current coursework. Students will be assigned to a clinical education rotation under the direct supervision of a clinical preceptor. Third in the series of four practicum courses. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 551 - Pract in AT IV

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Reviews and refines skills previously acquired and evaluated in previous coursework. Students will be assigned to a clinical education rotation under the direct supervision of a clinical preceptor. Fourth in the series of four practicum courses. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 566 - Therapeutic Modalities

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ATEP 550. Physiology, indications, contraindications, and the application of therapeutic modalities for athletic injuries. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 569 - Clinical Anatomy Laboratory

    Credits: 1. Offered Fall. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Clinical applications of anatomy in Athletic Training. Laboratory time for practical applications including prosected cadavers, surface anatomy, osteology, radiology, functional analysis of movement, applied clinical anatomy and sports application. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 572 - Therapeutic Exercise

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ATEP 566. Theories and application methods of comprehensive therapeutic exercise programs for athletic injuries. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 574 - Manual Therapy Techniques

    Credits: 3. Offered summer. Prereq., ATEP 572. Theories and application methods of comprehensive manual therapy for athletic injuries. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 578 - Org & Ad in AT

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Athletic Training Student. Explores leadership, organization, administration, and legal issues in athletic training. Topics include leadership; insurance; ethics; professional development; the planning, organization, operations, and assessment of athletic training programming and facilities. Fiscal and risk management will also be examined. Level: Graduate
  • ATEP 580 - Pharmacology for Sports Medicine

    Credits: 3. Prereq., graduate level student. Explores the pharmaceutical and chemical processes of therapeutic interventions and therapies. This course examines the constraints placed on patients in the performance environment as well management, protocols, and legal issues. Level: Graduate

Community Health

  • CHTH 355 - Theory Pract Comm Hlth Ed

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., KIN 205. History, philosophy, and theory related to community health education and health promotion. Includes the application of program development principles and health promotion strategies to community health programs.
  • CHTH 435 - Human Response To Stress

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior status. The study of psychosomatic and somatopsychic techniques for relaxation and self-enhancing strategies.
  • CHTH 445 - Prgrm Plan in Comm Health

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CHTH 355. Overview of the issues, approaches, and techniques community health educators and professionals utilize in planning and implementing programs to assist communities in improving health status and reducing risky behaviors and their determinants. This course co-convenes with HHP 541.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CHTH 485 - Theories of Hlth Behav and Cou

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Exploration of the helping role as it relates to health behavior, health assessment, problem-solving and referral skills. Application of theories to facilitation of healthy behavior changes.
  • CHTH 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
  • CHTH 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • CHTH 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121 (or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 355.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6

Coaching

  • COA 205 - Introduction to Coaching

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-4) Offered intermittently. Covers a variety of activities to include coaching theories, competitive coaching strategies, training methods and techniques. Covers requirements for the bronze level of the American Sport Education Program (ASEP).
    Course Attributes:
    • Coaching Course
  • COA 405 - Adv Concepts in Coaching

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior or senior undergraduate status or graduate status. This class will introduce students to a solid foundation in coaching to include: coaching theories, competitive coaching strategies, training methods and techniques.  This course will cover the requirements for the bronze level of the American Sport Education Program (ASEP).  Course graded credit/no credit or for a letter grade.  The class is appropriate for coaches at all levels but will focus on basic skills of coaching for youth through high school. 
    Course Attributes:
    • Coaching Course
  • COA 494 - Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Special courses experimental in nature dealing with a relatively narrow, specialized topic of particular current interest. Credit not allowed toward a graduate degree.
    Course Attributes:
    • Coaching Course

Emergency Care Provider

  • ECP 100 - First Aid and CPR

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Instruction will cover CPR, use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) and relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (FBAO). The First Aid component will cover general principles as well as medical, injury and environmental emergencies. Students will receive AHA Heartsaver CPR and First Aid certification. This class does not meet First Aid requirements for HHP majors.
  • ECP 101 - Pediatric First Aid and CPR

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently.  Within the guidelines of the American Heart Association, this course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and certification in: CPR for victims of all ages, use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) relief of foreign body airway obstruction (FBAO) and basic first aid procedures (medical, trauma and environmental emergencies) with a focus on the pediatric patient.  Upon successful completion of this course students will receive American Heart Association Heartsaver Pediatric First Aid/CPR certification.
  • ECP 102 - Wilderness First Aid

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ECP 120 - Emergency Medical Respondr Lec

    Credits: 2. Offered every term. Coreq., ECP 121. Development of knowledge of emergency care and CPR/AED techniques. In conjunction with ECP 121 provides certifications by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the American Heart Association upon successful completion.
  • ECP 121 - Emergency Medical Respondr Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Coreq., ECP 120. Development of knowledge of emergency care and CPR/AED techniques. In conjunction with ECP 120 provides certification by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the American Heart Association upon successful completion.
  • ECP 122 - Wilderness First Responder

    Credits: 2. Offered intermittently. Instruction in the prevention, recognition, and treatment of backcountry illness and injury. Successful students receive an Aerie Wilderness First Responder certification and an American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR certification. This course meets HHP department First Aid requirement but does not meet the CPR requirement.
  • ECP 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ECP 331 - Wilderness EMT

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. EMT-Basic curriculum with significantly more detail concerning care for patients in remote settings. Students must be 18 year old and never been convicted of a felony to qualify for certification. This course meets HHP department First Aid and CPR graduation requirements.
  • ECP 332 - EMT and Incident Management

    Credits: 5. This course follows the DOT’s National Registry of EMTs (NREMT) curriculum and is approved by the NREMT and the State of Montana Board of Medical Examiners. Incident management training includes mass-casualty incidents, extended rescue and evacuation scenarios. Clinical experience includes a two day health clinic in Costa Rica, ambulance and hospital emergency department clinical observations in Montana. Co-requisite courses PTRM 391 Wilderness Rescue and Survival Skills; PTRM 391 Wilderness Medicine and Risk Management.

Health Enhancement

  • HEE 203 - Professional Activities I

    Credits: 2. Offered Autumn. The instruction of basic skills for tennis, basketball, and Western Swing. Techniques, drills, and strategies will be taught. Demonstration and instruction skills developed. Active participation required.  
  • HEE 204 - Professional Activities II

    Credits: 2. Offered Spring. The instruction of basic skills for soccer, volleyball, and golf. Techniques, drills, and strategies will be taught. Demonstration and instruction skills developed. Active participation required.  
  • HEE 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • HEE 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of advisor and instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • HEE 301 - Meth of Secondary HE

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Application of educational theory in planning, analyzing, and presenting learning experiences to typical and atypical populations in secondary school physical education for students in grades 7-12. Active participation required.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • HEE 302 - Meth of Inst Strat in Elem PE

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq. admission into Teacher Education Program in the College of Education and HEE 233. Application of educational theory in planning, analyzing, and presenting learning experiences to typical and atypical populations in elementary school physical education for children in grades K-6. Active participation required.
  • HEE 340 - Methods of Health Education

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Prereq., admission to the teacher education program. Focus on developing and implementing strategies to teach K-12 health education.
  • HEE 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • HEE 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
  • HEE 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • HEE 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121 (or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 335.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6

Health and Human Performance

  • HHP 170 - Peak Court Sports

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • HHP 172 - CFM Crossfit

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • HHP 173 - YMCA Classes

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • HHP 174 - FVB Bowling

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Students may include up to but not more than 4 credits earned in HHP 100-179 activity courses in the total number of credits required for graduation. Students graded Credit/No Credit based on participation and a strict attendance policy. For a complete list of all classes offered go to the HHP Activity Program website.
    Course Attributes:
    • PE Activity Skills Course
  • HHP 238 - Lifeguarding - New Method

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., HHP 149 or equiv. skills. Skill development needed for the safe participation in various aquatic activities including the ability of self-recovered rescue of others. Provides the necessary knowledge and skills to serve as a pool lifeguard.
  • HHP 520 - Educational Research

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Same as C&I and EDLD 520. An understanding of basic quantitative and qualitative research methodology and terminology, particularly as they are used in studies presented in the professional literature. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 522 - Cog/Beh Intrvnts Perf Psyc

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., HHP 470 or equiv. Focus is on cognitive-behavioral interventions specific to enhancing human performance in a variety of individual and group settings. Strategies introduced based on research from health psychology, sport psychology, exercise psychology, clinical and counseling psychology Level: Graduate
  • HHP 523 - Case Studies in Perf Psych

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Through the usage of both real and hypothetical case studies, the course will examine the field of sport/performance psychology and its role in the broader field of sports medicine. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 524 - Ethics & Human Perf

    Credits: 3. Offered spring, even numbered years.  A critical examination of the ethical issues dominating the field of health and human performance and beyond with special emphasis on developing the conceptual frameworks needed to articulate our concerns and engage in meaningful dialogue with others. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 525 - Advanced Biomechanics

    Credits: 3. This course is focused on developing laboratory skills and an advanced understanding of the quantitative and qualitative basis for human motion. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Newtonian mechanics governing biological motion and the roles of the musculo-skeletal, nervous and cardio-vascular systems during human activity. This integrative approach will be used to quantify and understand motion by, and within, the human body; examples will be drawn from the sub-disciplines of clinical gait analysis, gerontology, sports medicine, biological engineering and performance physiology. The lecture portion of this course is co-convened with KIN425 Biomechanics. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 528 - Adv Exercise Prescription

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even years. Prereqs., Graduate status or consent of the instructor. This class presents the principles and practices of advanced athletic performance training in a thorough and useful sequence.  Testing and improving power, strength, speed, quickness, coordination, agility, flexibility, local muscular endurance, and cardiovascular aerobic capacity and endurance are covered based on the scientific record. Students will learn how to tailor sport specific training exercises and drills and periodize the training program precisely for peak performance at critical points in the competitive season.  Level: Graduate
  • HHP 529 - Adv Exercise Physiol I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., HHP 377, 378 or equiv. Advanced study of the effect of work, activity and exercise on human biochemistry, metabolism, endocrinology and muscle function. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 530 - Adv Exercise Physiol II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd years. Prereq., HHP 529 or equiv. Advanced study of system physiology (circulatory, respiratory and renal function) and environmental factors applied to physical work, activity and exercise Level: Graduate
  • HHP 531 - Lab Proc In Exer Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to common laboratory tools associated with clinical and health assessment techniques, research measures, and data collection. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 540 - Comm Hlth Promotion Strategies

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Exploration of the role of the health professional in the development and implementation of educational, organizational, economic, and/or environmental strategies that promote individual and community health. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 541 - Prgrm Plan in Comm Health

    Credits: 3. Prereq. HHP 540, admission to the Health and Human Performance major, and graduate standing. Overview of the issues, approaches, and techniques community health educators and professionals utilize in planning and implementing programs to assist communities in improving health status and reducing risky behaviors and their determinants. Application of program planning research methods including needs analyses, data collection, theory application, strategy development, and evaluation. This course co-convenes with CHTH 445. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • HHP 542 - Advanced Study Mind/Body/Spirit

    Credits: 3. This course is a comprehensive exploration of the body, mind and spirit relationship. An in-depth examination of the concepts, theoretical application, and research of the mind/body/spirit relationship will be applied to health, prevention of disease, and healing used in contemporary society. Conventional thinking will be stretched & challenged as diverse M/B/S ideas, constructs and paradigms will be considered & discussed. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 544 - CBPR Methods for Health

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even years. Instruction will present the principles and practice of community-based participatory research methods (CBPR) and mixed-methods approachs that offers strategies for studying and addressing health and social problems. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered spring. Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., HHP 486, 520. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-4) Offered every term. Prereq., current First Aid and CPR certification. Consent of advisor and instructor. Community Health prereq HHP 540, HHP 544. Supervised field work in public and private agencies and institutions. 45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., HHP 486, 520. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • HHP 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Health

  • HTH 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of advisor and instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • HTH 370 - Peer Health Education

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Introduction to peer health education strategies and techniques. Instruction in the areas of wellness, drug and alcohol abuse prevention, and sexual assault prevention. Students develop and implement a peer health program focused on prevention of major health problems among college students.
  • HTH 395 - Peer Health Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., HTH 370. Practical experience in planning, coordinating, and implementing health education activities for the campus community. Students address topics related to wellness, drug and alcohol prevention, or sexual assault awareness.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • HTH 430 - Hlth and Mind/Body/Spirit

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing. Overview of how the mind/body/spirit relationship affects health. Examination of current research exploring how thoughts, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs influence and mediate health outcome. Exploration of the theoretical applications of mind/body/spirit in health and healing used in contemporary society.
  • HTH 465 - Leading Hlth, Hmn Perform Orgs

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., KIN 205 and junior standing. Leadership, management, organizational structure assertiveness, conflict management, public relations, decision-making, budget management, and a broad overview of human resource management, all as they relate to health and human performance settings.
  • HTH 475E - Leg Eth Issues Hlth Ex Pro

    Credits: 3. Prereq., upper-division or graduate status. Legal bases for litigation in the health and exercise professions, with emphasis on negligence, liability, and risk identification and risk management. Utilizing the Western ethical traditions, the ethics component examines moral/ethical development through the lifespan via analysis of specific human behaviors.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • HTH 481 - Teaching HHP

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-4) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instructor. Students assist in the preparation and grading of demonstrations and laboratory assignments, and laboratory instruction of undergraduate students enrolled in HHP laboratory courses. Students are given advanced instruction in principles of the HHP course.
  • HTH 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • HTH 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121(or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 335.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6

Kinesiology

  • KIN 201 - Basic Exercise Prescription

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Theory, principles, and practice of exercise prescription for aerobic and resistance exercise programs for health, fitness and performance. Students must register for the lecture and a linked lab.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • KIN 205 - Foundations of HHP

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. An overview of the foundational principles comprising the field of HHP with special emphasis on the historical and philosophical foundations, and the evolution of the unity of mind/body concept. Includes an overview of program options, analysis of future directions, and career choices.
  • KIN 248 - Prin Optimal Perfm for Athlts

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring.  Introduction to an optimal performance model, with focus upon specific physical, psychological, and environmental factors that contribute to human performance.
  • KIN 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of advisor and instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • KIN 310 - Strength Training & Cond

    Credits: 2. This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of aerobic exercise and resistance training related to health, fitness and performance. Subject matter will include, but is not limited to maximizing student involvement in the understanding of physical training and the designing of exercise programs for health (both physical and mental), fitness and performance. This course will lay a basic practical foundation for students to design training programs, understand and design programs for athletic performance and to develop the fundamental theories of training for future coaches.
  • KIN 320 - Exercise Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered every term.  Prereq., BIOH 370 or BIOH 211N, KIN 201; coreq., KIN 321. Investigation of the physiological changes and the significance of these changes as they occur during physical work, activity and exercise.  Focus on basic energy, musculosketal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems as they relate to aerobic and anaerobic exercise.  Emphasis will be placed on the response of these systems to both acute exercise, and the adaptations to chronic exercise. Credit not allowed toward graduate degree in the exercise science option in Health and Human Performance.
  • KIN 321 - Exercise Physiology Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., BIOH 370 or BIOH 211N; coreq., KIN 320. Laboratory session examining the physiological effect of the physical work, activity and exercise on the functions of the human body. Credit not allowed toward graduate degree in the exercise science option in Health and Human Performance.
  • KIN 322 - Kinesiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOH 211N or BIOH 370; coreq., KIN 323. Anatomy and kinesiology of the neuromusculoskeletal system and body cavities in relation to movement and function.
  • KIN 323 - Anatomical Kinesiology Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOH 211N or BIOH 370; coreq., KIN 322. Anatomy and kinesiology of the neuromusculoskeletal system and body cavities in relation to movement and function.
  • KIN 330 - Motor Learning and Control

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., BIOH 201N or BIOH 365. Focused on developing an understanding of the anatomy and physiology within the nervous system necessary for movement. Establishes an understanding of the basic science involved in the control of motor tasks, and uses this foundation to evaluate case studies that will focus on sport performance, clinical deficits, age-related alterations, learning of motor tasks following injury, and other motor-related tasks.
  • KIN 410 - Adv Strength Training & Cond

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., KIN 320, senior or graduate student status. Advanced resistance and aerobic exercise testing and prescription for both healthy and clinical populations.
  • KIN 425 - Biomechanics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., KIN 320 & M 115 or higher and major in health and human performance or athletic training. Description and analysis of the fundamental principles of human movement. Includes quantitative study of the Newtonian mechanics governing biological motion and the roles of the musculo-skeletal, nervous and cardio-vascular systems during human activity.
  • KIN 440 - Sport Psychology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., upper-division or graduate status.  Course content is focused on the historical development of sport psychology, with emphasis upon the major principles and tactics of the discipline, including motivation, confidence, imagery, leadership, and team building.
  • KIN 447 - Analytical & Comm Techniques

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq., WRIT 101, WRIT 121 or WRIT 201. Analysis and communicative critique of literature, cinema, and other forms of popular media that contain allegorical life themes. Substantial reading, speaking and writing component. Emphasis on improving and maintaining communication skills.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • KIN 460 - ECG Assessment

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior, senior, or graduate status. Laboratory sessions combined with class sessions to understand electrocardiography and the assessment of electrocardiograms, both at rest and during exercise.
  • KIN 480 - Teaching Anatomy, Physiology

    Credits: 4. (R-4) Offered every term. Prereq., student must have received at least a “B” in Human Anatomy and Physiology and consent of instructor. Students assist in preparation and grading of demonstrations and laboratory assignments, and provide laboratory instruction of undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 201N/202N-211N/212N. Students are given advanced instruction in principles of human anatomy and physiology.
  • KIN 483 - Exercise Disease & Aging

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., KIN 320,321, 460; coreq. KIN 484. Focus on guidelines for exercise testing and prescription for individuals with chronic disease including heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, arthritis, osteoporosis, elderly and pulmonary disease. Class requires 25 assigned hours of service learning. Covers material necessary for ACSM clinical certification exam when combined with KIN 201, 320, 321, 460, and 484.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • KIN 484 - Exercise Disease & Aging Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., KIN 320, 321; coreq., KIN 483. Laboratory sessions focus on practical exercise testing and prescription for individuals with chronic disease including coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, arthritis, osteoporosis, elderly and pulmonary disease; basic ECG testing and analysis. Covers material necessary for ACSM clinical certification exam when combined with KIN 201, 320, 321, 460, and 483.
  • KIN 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
  • KIN 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • KIN 498 - Internship

    Credits: 2 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq. all HHP options minimum junior standing and ECP 120/121 (or equivalent).  Prereqs per option. Exercise Science Applied: KIN 320/321.  If internship is coaching or strength & conditioning must also have completed KIN 410 and COA 405.  Exercise Science Pre-Professional: KIN 320/321.  If internship is cardiac rehab must also have completed KIN 460/483/484. Community Health: CHTH 335.  Supervised field experiences with private businesses, public agencies, or institutions.  45 hours of internship site work = 1 credit.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship 498 may count toward graduation. Students should not be registered for more than 14 credits their internship semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • KIN 499 - Capstone

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R 6) Offered autumn. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent work under the University omnibus option. See index.

Nutrition

  • NUTR 221N - Basic Human Nutrition

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. The principles of science as applied to current concepts and controversies in the field of human nutrition.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • NUTR 411 - Nutrition For Sprts & Exercise

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., KIN 320 and junior standing. Nutritional parameters of athletic performance including intervention planning, energy production, the energy nutrients, vitamins and minerals, principles of balanced diets, timing and composition of intakes, hydration, weight management strategies, and nutritional needs for special situations.

Forestry and Conservation

Fish, Wildlife Science & Mgmt

  • WILD 105N - Wildlife & People

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Intended for non-wildlife biology majors. Interactions of wildlife and people in today’s society.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • WILD 170 - Fish & Wildlife Interest Group

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Discussion section for incoming students.
  • WILD 180 - Careers in Wildlife Biology

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. Subject matter and fields of study within wildlife biology conservation and management. Topics to include wildlife ecology, aquatic ecology, human dimensions, conservation and management, and other opportunities for careers in wildlife biology.
  • WILD 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • WILD 230 - Conservation Science

    Credits: 3. Prereq., BIOO 105N or BIOO 101N or BIOB 160N or BIOB 170N or BIOE 172N or consent of instructor. The goal of this class is to introduce students to major issues related to the conservation of biodiversity. Lectures will illustrate how science can be used to identify and solve conservation problems. Lectures will cover current threats to biodiversity (human population growth, extinctions, habitat destruction, degradation and fragmentation, overexploitation, invasive species, global climate change) and discuss how science can be used to help ameliorate these impacts.
  • WILD 240 - Intro to Biostatistics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., calculus and consent of instr. Introduction to statistical ecology: distributions, hypothesis testing, and fitting models to data with emphasis on problems in ecological sampling.
    Course Attributes:
    • Honors Course
  • WILD 275 - Wildlife Conservation

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., sophomore standing or consent of instr. Principles of animal ecology and framework of wildlife administration as a basis for the conservation of wild birds and animals, and biodiversity. Intended for non-wildlife biology majors.
  • WILD 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • WILD 346 - Wildlife Physiological Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. Only open to Wildlife Biology Majors. How physiological and biochemical processes in animals influence behavior and ecology. Application of physiological approaches to wildlife conservation such as assessment of animal health, nutritional condition, and physiological performance.
  • WILD 370 - Wildlife Habitat Cons & Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., junior/senior standing in wildlife biology, BIOE 370, or consent of instr. Application of principles of wildlife biology to conservation and management of wild bird and mammal habitats including field applications.
  • WILD 374 - Hunter Check Station

    Credits: 1. (R-2) Offered autumn. Students learn techniques for determining species, age and sex of game animals, then work 3-5 days as volunteers at hunter check stations operated by management agencies.
  • WILD 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • WILD 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • WILD 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • WILD 408 - Advanced Fisheries

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOO 340. Quantitative analysis and interpretation of fish populations and community data for use in management. Selection, application and evaluation of management techniques.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • WILD 410 - Wildlife Policy & Biopolitics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring, odd years. Prereq., junior standing. Overview of the laws affecting wildlife and how those laws are initiated, implemented, and enforced; impact of politics, interest groups, and agency jurisdictions.
  • WILD 460 - Internat Wildlife Cons Issues

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., a course in wildlife biology and/or conservation biology. Review of major international wildlife conservation issues with emphasis on the social context of the issues and applied solutions.
  • WILD 470 - Conserv of Wildlife Populatns

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., BIOE 370, M 162 or M 171, and senior standing in Biology, Forestry, Resource Conservation, Recreation Management or Wildlife Biology. Application of population ecology principles and theory to the conservation and management of wildlife populations.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • WILD 472 - Wildlife Hand & Chem Immobiliz

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Principles of wildlife chemical immobilization for researchers and managers.  Ethical and legal issues, field organization, animal care and handling, immobilizing drugs, drug delivery systems, animal monitoring and veterinary emergencies.  No labs.
  • WILD 480 - The Upshot--Appld Wildlife Mgt

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq/Coreq.,WILD 370 or WILD 470. Designed for students to apply their knowledge in the development of wildlife management planning.
  • WILD 485 - Aquatic Invertebrate Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. This course is designed to provide students an understanding of the life histories, ecology and importance of macroinvertebrates in freshwater aquatic systems. The primary focus will be on insects, although an introduction to other invertebrates will also be included. The lab portion will involve identification of major groups of aquatic macroinvertebrates and participation in an environmental assessment using invertebrates as indicators of stream condition and restoration efficacy.
  • WILD 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • WILD 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Original investigations or problems not related to student's thesis.
  • WILD 494 - Senior Wildlife Seminar

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior standing in wildlife biology or consent of instr. Analysis and discussion led by students of current topics in wildlife biology.
  • WILD 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • WILD 499 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr.; senior standing. Preparation of major paper based on study or research of a topic selected with an advisor according to needs and objectives of student.
  • WILD 540 - Research Design

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., introductory statistics course or consent of instr. Examination of study designs for experiments, quasiexperiments, observational studies, and sampling surveys with an emphasis on application. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 541 - Research Design Lab

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Coreq., WILD 540. Students will be expected to learn R programming skills, R data management and R graphing functions as well an introduction to statistical analysis in R.
  • WILD 542 - Stat Apps in WBIO

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-5) Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Explores statistical problems encountered by wildlife biology and ecology graduate students. Students will bring statistical problems of interest to class where, as a group, we will explore analysis options, assumptions, pitfalls, and alternative solutions. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 545 - Strong Inference Science

    Credits: 1. (R-7) Offered every fall. Graduate level, or consent of instructor for advanced undergraduates. Teach principles and philosophy of conducting strong inference science. Practical application to student’s own thesis research. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 560 - Langscape Conservation

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Examination of how various spatial and temporal scales influence wildlife and their habitats. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 562 - Wildlife Habitat Modeling

    Credits: 4. Offered spring, odd years. Prereq., consent of instr. A survey of theory and applications in the study of resource selection by animals. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 563 - Topics in Habitat Ecology

    Credits: 1. (R-15) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Discussion of recent scientific papers on advances in ecology, conservation, and population dynamics as related to habitat ecology and conservation.  WBIO 562 or equivalent strongly recommended.  Level: Graduate
  • WILD 564 - Scientific Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered spring, even years.  Exploration of the major components and process of scientific writing within the field of Wildlife Biology, primarily focusing on research proposals and peer-review publications.  Level: Graduate
  • WILD 568 - Topics in Aquatic Ecology

    Credits: 1. (R-15) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Review and synthesis of the scientific literature current issues and analyses in aquatic ecology.  We assume a general understanding of fish biology, aquatic ecology, as well as a background in population, community and ecosystem ecological concepts. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 570 - Applied Population Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., courses in ecology, statistics, and calculus. Application of advanced population ecology tools and concepts to the evaluation of human perturbations on wildlife populations. Topics include methods to detect declining trends, the interacting components of population viability analysis, and identification of strategies to reverse declines. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 580 - Populations Dynamics

    Credits: 1. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Discussion of recent papers on interface of population dynamics, ecological interactions, and wildlife management. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 594 - Grad Sem Wldlf Biol

    Credits: 1. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in wildlife biology or Fish Wildlife Biology or consent of instr. Analysis of selected problems in wildlife biology and conservation. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R 20) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing and consent of instr. Original investigations or problems not related to student's thesis. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • WILD 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R 15) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing in wildlife biology or consent of instr. Graded pass/not pass only. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing in wildlife biology and consent of instr. Professional paper written in the area of the student's major interest based on either primary or secondary research. Subject matter must be approved by graduate committee. Graded pass/not pass only. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 697 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 20. (R-20) Offered every term. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • WILD 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 20. (R-20) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing in wildlife biology. Preparation of thesis. Level: Graduate

Writing

  • WRIT 325 - Science Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., WRIT 101 or equiv. and sophomore standing. Discussion of different types of science writing and focus on methods to achieve more fluent prose. Includes material on logic, inference, and developing arguments that rely on data.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate

Forestry

  • FORS 130 - Intro Forestry Field Skills

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., Forestry major or consent of instructor. This course is focused on developing introductory forestry field skills through experiential learning at the College’s Lubrecht Experimental Forest. Classroom lecture and experiences that introduce students to orienteering, map reading, GPS, tree measurements, fire and fuels management, recreation, human dimensions, hydrology, wood products, and the careers possible with a Forestry degree.
  • FORS 140 - Urban Forestry

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. An introduction to urban forestry principles and practices. Benefits of the urban forest. Topics covered include plant species selection, site design, site assessment, planting, watering, fertilization, insects and diseases, pruning and tree care, inventory of property values, and community forestry development.
  • FORS 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FORS 192 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Problems course designed to allow individual research at the undergraduate level.
  • FORS 201 - Forest Biometrics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., M 115 or M 121 or M 122 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172. Introduction to probability and statistical methods for forestry and environmental sciences covering natural resource applications of common probability distributions, data analysis, hypothesis testing, and regression.
  • FORS 202 - Forest Mensuration

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., FORS 201 or STAT 216 or SOCI 202 or WILD 240; and M 121 and M 122 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172. The theory and practice of timber inventory and growth projection, including field measurements, sampling procedures, statistical methods, inventory compilation, and stand growth simulation under specified management prescriptions. Stand growth under specified management prescriptions.
  • FORS 230 - Forest Fire Management

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Fire as an ecological factor in Western forests is presented.  Fire weather, the measurement of fire weather, and the factors of fuel, weather and topography that influence fire behavior, and fire management decisions are included.  NFDRS, state and national fire policy evolutions are discussed.  Basic fire suppression tactics are also presented.
  • FORS 232 - Forest Insects & Diseases

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Identification, significance of and remedies for insect infestations and infectious and non-infectious diseases of forests and forest products.
  • FORS 235 - Prob Solving for Forest Oper

    Credits: 4. Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 115 or M 121 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172.  Introduction to problem solving including the fundamentals of statics and mechanics of materials presented in the context of forest operations.
  • FORS 240 - Tree Biology

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. Suggested coreq., FORS 241N. The physical and biological requirements for the growth and development of trees. Discussions of: identification, classification, range, and economic importance of the major tree species of North America.
  • FORS 241N - Dendrology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Suggested coreq., FORS 240. Methods and techniques for identifying the major families of North American trees, based on gross morphological and anatomical features. Building and use of identification keys.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • FORS 250 - Intro to GIS for Forest Mgt

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Open to sophomores or juniors or with consent of instructor. This course is designed as a practical introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for storing, retrieving, analyzing and displaying spatial data. It will also cover the history of cartography and the conventions of the modern map-making process.
  • FORS 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors; new courses or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FORS 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual research at the undergraduate level.
  • FORS 308 - Fire Ecology Field Studies

    Credits: 3. This course introduces students to all aspects of forest demography and forest community ecology in the field. Particular attention is given to the agents of woody plant mortality, including beetle gallery identification, pathogenic fungi, density-dependent mortality, fire, and the effects of landscape position. Students learn how data are collected to maximize information used to answer scientific questions, including the relationships between accuracy, precision, uncertainty, and cost (in time and money). Students learn how to measure fuel loading at landscape scales according to federal standards. In addition to specific measurements in ponderosa pine and larch/mixed-conifer forest types, students visit and compare Engelmann spruce/subalpine forests and riparian cottonwood forests. Students will also study forest-river interactions and the modification thereof by fire.
  • FORS 310 - Field Methods in Forest Ecology

    Credits: 3. This course introduces students to all aspects of forest demography and forest community ecology in the field. Particular attention is given to the agents of woody plant mortality, including beetle gallery identification, pathogenic fungi, spatially explicit density-dependent mortality, fire, and the effects of landscape position. Students learn how data are collected to maximize information used to answer scientific questions, including the relationships between accuracy, precision, uncertainty, and cost (in time and money). Students then collect tree demography data within the Yosemite Forest Dynamics Plot. Students learn how to measure fuel loading at landscape scales according to federal standards. In addition to specific measurements in one forest type (white fir/sugar pine), students visit and compare the other principal forest types of the Sierra Nevada and White Mountains (ponderosa pine, red fir, Jeffrey pine, lodgepole pine, whitebark pine, pinyon/juniper, and bristlecone pine).
  • FORS 320 - Forest Environmental Economics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., ECNS 201S; and M 121 and M 122 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172.  Economic techniques to support decision making about the allocation of scarce resources, and management of forests for timber and other ecosystem services.
  • FORS 330 - Forest Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., FORS 210 or ENSC 245N or NRSM 210N; and BIOO 105N or BIOB 170N or BIOE 172 or BIOB 160N or FORS 240; and FORS 201 or STAT 216 or SOCI 202 or WILD 240 or PSYX 222. Examination of physical and biological factors affecting forest structure, composition, and function, including biodiversity, disturbance, and nutrient cycling. Field labs throughout Northern Rockies including developing skills in field observation, data interpretation and problem solving.
  • FORS 331 - Wildland Fuel Management

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., FORS 230 or consent of instr. The fire ecology of some western vegetation types is discussed.  Elements of the principles of wildland fuel management are presented.  Prescribed fire use and mechanical manipulation are matched to historic ecosystem processes.  Smoke management considerations and health issues are also presented.  
  • FORS 333 - Basic&Applied Fire Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., FORS 230. A detailed, analysis of fire ecology in terrestrial ecosystems with a focus on the Rocky Mountains, including fire history, fire effects, landscape pattern, land use legacies, and management implications.
  • FORS 340 - Forest Product Manufacturing

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Survey of the manufacture of wood-based products generated from timber harvest. Laboratory field trips to several local manufacturing facilities.
  • FORS 341 - Timber Harvesting & Roads

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., NRSM 200 or WRIT 222. An overview of harvesting system capabilities and selection for multiple resource objectives. Fundamentals of forest road management. Best management practices as they apply to forest operations in Montana and the western United States.
  • FORS 342 - Wood Anatomy, Properties, & ID

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOO 105N or FORS 240 or FORS 241N. Lecture and laboratory investigation of the structure, identification and physical and mechanical properties of the commercial tree species of North America.
  • FORS 347 - Multiple Resource Silviculture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., FORS 330 or BIOE 370. Credit not allowed for both FORS 347 and 349. An introduction to the concepts and application of silvicultural techniques to forest ecosystems to meet multiple resource objectives.
  • FORS 349 - Practice of Silviculture

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., FORS 202 or FORS 302 and FORS 241N and either prereq or coreq FORS 330. Practice of Silviculture is designed primarily for Forestry majors (open to others with appropriate prerequisites), and will consider the conceptual foundations behind various silvicultural practices and techniques, as well as and their application in forest ecosystems to meet multiple resource objectives. The course will cover natural stand dynamics, stand assessment and site classification schemes, even- and uneven-aged silvicultural systems, thinning/stand density concepts, regeneration practices, stand diagnosis and prescription development, vegetative management strategies for diverse objectives, along with quantitative assessment and modeling of alternative prescriptions.
  • FORS 350 - Forestry Apps of GIS

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., FORS 250 or FORS 284 or GPHY 284. Introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of computerized spatial data management and analysis systems and application to natural resource management.
  • FORS 351 - Env Remote Sensing

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The theory and application of photo- and electro-optical remote sensing for mapping resources and developing information systems.
  • FORS 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 0 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FORS 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study or research problems.
  • FORS 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • FORS 434 - Advanced Forest Roads

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., FORS 341. The purpose of this course is to help students understand the principles and skills of forest road design and the concepts of forest transportation planning. The course will cover the basic topics of road location, design, construction, and maintenance and provide students with techniques to identify the combination of roads, facilities and transport systems which minimize costs and negative environmental impacts.
  • FORS 435 - Advaced Timber Harvesting

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereqs., FORS 341. This course covers the fundamentals of logging feasibility and cost analyses of various timber harvesting systems including the characteristics and performance of ground vehicles, cable and aerial systems; cost factors and cost analysis procedures; safety issues; and environmental impacts of harvesting systems .
  • FORS 436 - Project Appraisal

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., FORS 320 or consent of instructor. A suite of techniques, collectively referred to as project appraisal methods, facilitate evaluation of alternative projects. In this applied, computer laboratory-based course, students will become familiar with the use of discounted cash flow analysis and mathematical programing to evaluate proposed courses of action and recommend the economically efficient alternative. Skills will be developed applying these techniques to problems faced by natural resource managers and policy-makers.
  • FORS 440 - Forest Stand Management

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., FORS 202 or 302; FORS 341; FORS 347 or 349. The management and manipulation of forest stands to reach multiple objectives, with a focus on the planning of forest operations for a community partner.
  • FORS 444 - Applied Methods in Forest Restoration and Utilization

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Meeting all day on Saturdays, and some Sundays, this course involves training students to safely and efficiently identify forest stands to be restored through appropriately-planned management activities including both live and dead timber felling operations, manufacture of sawlogs and pulpwood, proper management of slash and residuals, grapple skidding and the production of lumber using both circular sawmill and bandsaw mill.
  • FORS 481 - Forest Planning

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., FORS 320; FORS 347 or FORS 349 or consent of instr. Integrated multiple use planning at the forest-wide level: defining multi-resource management goals, generating management alternatives, projecting outcomes, assessing environmental impacts, and implementing preferred option.
  • FORS 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FORS 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study or research problems.
  • FORS 495 - Wildland RxFire Practicum

    Credits: 3. Offered wintersession. Co-convened with FORS 544. Prereq. Fire experience and Consent of Instructor. An intensive field course providing students with technical training, practical applications, and theoretical foundations in ecological burning for restoration purposes. Class is typically held in southeastern United States.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Co-Convened Course
    • Service Learning
  • FORS 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off-campus. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty advisor and Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • FORS 499 - Senior Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior standing and consent of instr. Preparation of a major paper based on study or research in a field selected according to the needs and objectives of the student.
  • FORS 505 - Sampling Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Fundamentals of statistical sampling emphasizing natural and environmental resource applications.  Principles of inferences and alternative estimators are studied in the context of simple random, systematic, unequal probability, stratified, and 3P/Poisson designs.  Variable radius plot sampling, line intersect sampling, and other probability proportional to size designs used in forest and ecological inventories are also covered. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 521 - Heur. Opt. for For. Plan.

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq. FORS 481 or equiv. and consent of instr. Modern heuristic optimization techniques and their applications to solving spatially explicit forest planning problems.  Level: Graduate
  • FORS 533 - Use Fire Wldland Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., consent of instr. Evolution of federal fire policy is discussed.  Western fire ecology and the planned use of fire for wildlife, range, and forest applications of prescribed fire are presented.  Fire behavior and a fire science vocabulary are introduced.  Students review literature, present seminars, and lead discussions.   Level: Graduate
  • FORS 535 - Applied Forest Ecology

    Credits: 3. Prereq., graduate status or consent of instructor. This course covers the use of ecological theory and data in the design of silvicultural treatments to achieve multiple management objectives, with particular emphasis on forest restoration and climate change adaptation. We examine methods of silvicultural design, including use of historical and contemporary reference conditions, and climate adaptation strategies. Analysis exercises use the open source statistical program and language R for data analysis, visualization, and modeling, especially of spatial point pattern data. Introduction to monitoring and adaptive management of silvicultural treatments. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 538 - Ecological Statistics

    Credits: 3. Offered in the Fall. Prerequisites: STAT451/452 or equivalent.  This is an applied course covering advanced statistical modeling techniques using examples from forestry, ecology, and the environmental sciences.  Covers data management, visualization, and scripting with R, an open source data analysis and statistics platform. Explores various parametric and semi-parametric modeling strategies that allow for non-linear response functions and/or non-Gaussian response distributions.  Estimation and inference in the context of generalized linear models, generalized additive models, and classification and regression trees are discussed using examples from the scientific literature.  Lays the foundation for subsequent graduate-level analytic coursework.   Level: Graduate
  • FORS 540 - Distrubance Ecology

    Credits: 3. Prereq., graduate status or consent of instructor. This course covers foundational disturbance ecological concepts; examines important and influential disturbance ecology theories; and introduces important disturbance agents and processes operating in temperate and boreal forest ecosystems. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 544 - Adv. Wildland RXFire Practicum

    Credits: 3. Offered wintersession. Co-convened with FORS 495. Prereq. Consent of Instructor. An intensive field course providing students with technical training, practical applications, and theoretical foundations in ecological burning for restoration purposes. Students will practice leadership skills by supervising and training fire personnel in application of prescribed fire. Class typically held in southeastern United States.  Credit is not allowed for both FORS495 Wildland Prescribed Fire Practicum and FORS544 Prescribed Fire Practicum. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Co-Convened Course
    • Service Learning
  • FORS 545 - Silviculture Research

    Credits: 1. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr.; prereq. or coreq., FOR 347 or equiv. Reading and discussion of scientific literature related to silvicultural practice and science. Different topic each semester. Students become familiar with silviculture literature, develop skills for scrutinizing scientific literature, and examine silvicultural topics in detail. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 551 - Digital Image Processing

    Credits: 4. Offered intermittently. Prereq., FORS 351 or consent of instr. Fundamentals of electro-optical digital remote sensors, data compilation, preprocessing, and pattern recognition. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 594 - Graduate Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-12). Offered Spring.  Prereq. graduate standing.  Presentations by students, faculty, and professionals on issues and topics in their field.    Level: Graduate
  • FORS 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study or research problems. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
  • FORS 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • FORS 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Preparation of Master of Ecosystem Management professional paper. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 697 - Graduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Independent graduate research in forest management, wood science, soils, wildlife management, silviculture, recreation and other topic areas. Level: Graduate
  • FORS 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Preparation of thesis/dissertation. Level: Graduate

Nat Resourc Science & Mgmt

  • NRSM 121S - Nature of Montana

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  An exploration of the major natural resource management issues facing the people of Montana and the social processes to manage environmental conflicts. Provides an introduction to the function of ecological systems and the impacts of human uses on the environment and looks at strategies for addressing global climate change, ex-urban population growth, and protecting environmental quality.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • NRSM 170 - International Envir. Change

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. An introduction to natural and anthropogenic environmental change from ancient to contemporary times. Exploration of the historical role and importance of ecological disturbance on the development and maintenance of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Introduction to fields of study available in the College of Forestry and Conservation.
  • NRSM 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • NRSM 200 - Nat.Resource Professional Wrtg

    Credits: 3. Offered fall and spring to College of Forestry and Conservation majors. Prereq., WRIT 101. Students synthesize scientific literature and, using appropriate evidence and APA style, write natural-resources-based documents appropriate for distribution to scientists, managers, and the public.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • NRSM 210N - Soils, Water and Climate

    Credits: 3. Prereq., M 115 or M 121 or M 122 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172. The factors affecting earth’s terrestrial ecosystems are rapidly changing, and understanding their impact on ecosystem services to humanity is becoming increasingly important and yet complex. In this course, students will explore how climate, water and soils interact to shape Earth’s biosphere. We will introduce students to a number of fundamental concepts in climate, hydrology, and soil science to gain a comprehensive view of the factors that shape and affect all terrestrial ecosystems. Through a series of lectures and field-based laboratories, students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of climate and hydrology that influence soil development, how they vary across small spatial scales, and how these physical, chemical, and biological processes interact to affect soil development. Ultimately, this class will introduce students to intimate relationship between climate, water, and soils, and how they interact to affect patterns of vegetation we see across the biosphere.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • NRSM 215 - Field Studies in Conservation

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Open to Resource Conservation Majors. Field study focusing on flora and fauna, history of land use and ecological change, contemporary forest management, conservation and community development in western Montana.
  • NRSM 265 - Elements of Ecological Restora

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., one course in the ecological or biological sciences: BIOO 105N, BIOB 160N, BIOB 170N, BIOB 172, BIOE 370, BIOE 428, BIOE 447 or BIOE 448; or FORS 330; or NRSM 271N or NRSM 462 or consent of instructor. Overview of the natural and social science elements of ecological restoration, including the ecological foundations of restoration, practices used to restore terrestrial and aquatic habitats, philosophical and ethical challenges involved, and current initiatives in Montana and the United States. Includes Saturday field trips.
  • NRSM 271N - Conservation Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. An overview of ecological concepts and how ecology is applied to further our understanding of ecosystems and conservation.  Topics include: ecosystems functions and values, biomes, natural selection and speciation, biodiversity, succession, climate change, fragmentation, protected areas, impacts of exotic species and other human influences on ecosystem functions.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • NRSM 273 - Wilderness/Civ Field Stds

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring.  Field studies in ecology and conservation.  Includes natural history, field journaling, ecological monitoring, protected area management, and community conservation.  One-day trips as well as extended backcountry trips.  Part of the Wilderness and Civilization program.  
  • NRSM 281 - Science of Climate Change

    Credits: 3. This course provides an introduction to Earth’s climate system and the scientific evidence of climate change. This course explores how past climate has shaped Earth's ecosystem and how humans are currently altering Earth's climate system, as well as potential future climate scenarios. Through this course students will gain a better understanding of Earth's energy budget, the global carbon cycle, and potential impacts of climate change. This class is open to all undergraduates, both science and non-science majors, and counts toward the Climate Change Studies minor.
  • NRSM 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R 12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors; new courses or one time offerings of current topics.
  • NRSM 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
  • NRSM 311 - Field Stds ecol/Human Commun

    Credits: 2 TO 3. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Via extended backcountry travel, experiential examination of the structure and function of the ecosystems occurring within the course area. Also investigates the relationship of those ecosystems with the people that manage, live, and work in the area. Offered by the Wild Rockies Field Institute.
  • NRSM 321 - Field Stds Energy Syst Montana

    Credits: 2 TO 3. Offered Summer. Via an extended bicycle tour of Montana, students examine a variety of energy developments and their environmental, social, and economic implications.
  • NRSM 335 - Environmental Entomology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd years. An introduction to the importance of insects in ecosystem function and process, and their use in ecological monitoring as indicators of ecological change, degradation, and the efficacy of ecological restoration efforts. This course also covers the effects of climate change and biological invasions in the context of both pest and beneficial insect species.
  • NRSM 344 - Ecosystem Science and Restoration Capstone

    Credits: 5. Offered spring. Prereq., junior or senior standing in Ecological Restoration and successful completion of NRSM 265 and one advanced ecology course: BIOE 370, BIOE 428, BIOE 447, BIOE 448, FORS 330, or NRSM 462.; and completion or concurrent enrollment in NRSM 465. This five-credit, service-learning course is the planning course for the capstone experience for students in the Ecosystem Science and Restoration major (although it is also open to students pursuing other majors). It is designed to get students active in research in ecosystem science and restoration ecology or in the application of ecological principles to restoration practice. The course includes lectures, labs, and hands-on experience working with ecologists and restoration practitioners from local government agencies, NGOs, or other organizations.
  • NRSM 345 - Watershed Dynamics

    Credits: 3. Coreq. ENST 291, 391 392, NRSM 346. Offered each autumn by Northwest Connections. Via hands on application in rural Montana, students investigate watershed function; introductory stream hydrology and morphology; and fish, amphibian and aquatic furbearer habitat characteristics. The course also explores impacts of road building, timber harvest, and watershed fragmentation on watershed and stream function, fish habitat, and fish populations.
  • NRSM 352 - Mountain Environment and Dev

    Credits: 3. Offered summer only. Coreq., PTRM 353.  This course covers the contentious issues surrounding environment and development in the Himalaya using the Garhwal region of India as the example.
  • NRSM 360 - Rangeland Mgt (equiv 260)

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing or consent of instr. An introduction to rangelands and their management, grazing influences, class of animal, grazing capacity, control of livestock distribution, improvements, competition and interrelationships with wildlife. Laboratory exercises to gain on-site experience on topics and concepts presented in lectures.
  • NRSM 370S - Wildland Conserv Pol/Govrnance

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Examination of the historical, philosophical, and legislative background for development and management of our national system of wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, trails, and national parks; their place in our social structure. Part of the Wilderness and Civilization program.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • NRSM 374 - Yellowstone Studies

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Ecological and sociopolitical perspectives on the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. Topics include winter ecology, biodiversity conservation, national park planning and management, winter recreation, fire, and wildlife. Field course in the Yellowstone area. Part of the Wilderness and Civilization Program.
  • NRSM 379 - Collab in Nat Res Decisions

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Political and social processes affecting natural resource decisions. Examination of cases of multi-party collaboration in forestry, range, and watershed management issues.
  • NRSM 385 - Watershed Hydrology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., M 115 or M 121 or M 122 or M 151 or M 162 or M 171 or M 172. An introduction to physical and biological controls over water movement and storage in the environment, and how those controls are affected by land management practices.
  • NRSM 386 - Watershed Hydrology Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Coreq., NRSM 385 or consent of instr. An introduction to basic watershed measurement and analysis techniques. Lab exercises designed around the use of spreadsheets and computer graphics.
  • NRSM 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 0 TO 12. (R 12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors; new courses or one time offerings of current topics.
  • NRSM 395 - Community-Based Approaches to Wildlife Conservation

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered each summer by Northwest Connections. Via field-based study in western Montana, students learn emerging strategies for reducing human-wildlife conflicts while considering ecological, economical, and societal impacts. Coreq., ENST 395 Wildlife Policy & Rural Communities and Field Ecology of Threatened & Endangered Species in the Northern Rockies. The course emphasizes the multiple perspectives of stakeholders and the importance of striving for collaborative solutions to conflicts over wildlife management and controversial species.
  • NRSM 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • NRSM 404 - Wilderness in American Context

    Credits: 4. An expansive treatment of the history of the wilderness preservation movement in the United States.  Introduction to the successive influences of philosophy, science, art and politics on society's relationship with wilderness.  Discussion of the Wilderness Act of 1964.
  • NRSM 408 - Global Cycles and Climate

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Same as CCS 408. An analysis of the earths major global biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the ways and extent to which each of them influences and interacts with the global climate system.  
  • NRSM 415 - Environmental Soil Science

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years Prereq., ENSC 245N or NRSM 210N or consent of instr. A detailed analysis of the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and how they function, with a focus on soil processes and how they affect, and are affected by human activities. Specific topics include element cycling, water quality, the effects of environmental change soil biogeochemistry, plant-soil interactions, and the consequences of large-scale disturbances on soil processes.
  • NRSM 418 - Ecosystem Climatology

    Credits: 3. Interactions between the biosphere and atmosphere to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students. This course will explore the interactions between Earth’s biosphere and atmosphere and how they affect climate over a range of scales. We will focus on the exchange of energy, mass, and important elements between the biosphere and atmosphere and how this exchange can lead to fascinating feedbacks in Earth’s climate system. Basic physics and math is not required but it is recommended.
  • NRSM 422 - Nat Res Policy/Administration

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Policy formation in the United States and a survey of the major resource policies interpreted in their historical and political contexts.
  • NRSM 424 - Community Forestry & Conservtn

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 524. In-depth examination of the history, theory and management issues faced in community-driven forestry and conservation in the United States and abroad.  Cannot get credit for both NRSM 424 and NRSM 524.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • NRSM 425 - Nat Res & Envir Economics

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate spring. Prereq., ENSC 201S or FORS 320; and M 115, M 121, M 122, M 151, M 162, M 171, or 172. Introduction to analytical approaches for economic analysis of management of non-renewable resources, fisheries, forests, threatened and endangered species, and the atmosphere.
  • NRSM 426 - Climate and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 526. This course examines the social and political aspects of climate change, with a focus on international and domestic processes and cases. Cannot get credit for both NRSM 426 and NRSM 526.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • NRSM 449E - Climate Change Ethics/Policy

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as CCS 449E. This course focuses on the ethical dimensions of climate change policy. It will cover the following major topics: (1) climate change, personal and collective responsibilities, (2) ethics, climate change and scientific uncertainty, (3) distributive justice and international climate change negotiations, (4) intergenerational justice and climate change policy.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • NRSM 455 - Riparian Ecology & Management

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereqs., successful completion or concurrent enrollment in NRSM 385 and completion of one of the following introductory ecology courses: BIOE 172, BIOE 370, BIOE 428, BIOE 447, BIOE 448, FORS 330, or NRSM 462. Importance of riparian/wetland areas and the complexities associated with their management for short and long term benefits.
  • NRSM 462 - Rangeland Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. NRSM 210N; and BIOO 105N or BIOB 170N or BIOE 172N or BIOB 160N or FORS 240; and FORS 201 or STAT 216 or SOCI 202 or WILD 240 or PSYX 222. We will discuss the ecological principles and processes that drive the structure and function of rangeland ecosystems. We will focus on the intersections of plant, animal, ecosystem, and landscape ecology. We will weave in discussions of management to understand how rangeland dynamics contribute and respond to differing management paradigms.
  • NRSM 465 - Foundations of Restoration Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate or junior or senior standing and NRSM 265 and one 300-400 level ecology courses: BIOE 370, BIOE 428, BIOE 447, BIOE 448, FORS 330, or NRSM 462; or consent of instructor. This course covers the primary ecological theories that inform the practice of ecological restoration. Topics include the dynamic nature of ecological systems, community assembly, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, food web dynamics, ecological engineering, macroecology, and statistical issues and study design.
  • NRSM 475 - Environment & Development

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 575. Examines key social forces that influence how individuals, groups and nation-states understand and live within their bio-physical environments, especially policies and processes relating to development, corporate capitalism, globalization, culture, class and other forms of power and social relations. Pays close attention to ways both indigenous and introduced resource use and management practices (including conservation) variably impact people of different races, classes, genders, cultures and livelihood practices. Cannot get credit for both NRSM 475 and NRSM 575.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • NRSM 489E - Ethics Forestry & Conservation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior or senior standing. Theoretical and practical ethical issues affecting the management of natural resources in national forests and on other public lands.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • NRSM 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., senior standing and successful completion or concurrent enrollment in NRSM 495; and consent of instr.  This seminar provides a forum for students to share the results of practicum projects conducted in NRSM 495.  Each student will lead at least one seminar during the semester.
  • NRSM 495 - ESR Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every semester. Prereq., senior standing in the Ecological Resotration major and successful completion of NRSM 344, a faculty-approved practicum proposal; and consent of instructor. The goal of this service-learning practicum is for students to gain real-world experience in research, monitoring, or project implementation. Students will implement a project under the supervision of faculty and mentors from local management agencies, organizations or other sponsors.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • NRSM 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off-campus. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty advisor and Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • NRSM 499 - Senior Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior standing and consent of instr. Preparation of a major paper based on study or research in a field selected according to the needs and objectives of the student.
  • NRSM 513 - Nat Res Conflict Resolution

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as ENST 513 and LAW 613. Examines the basic framework for preventing and resolving natural resource and environmental conflicts in America. Reviews the history of alternative approaches, emphasizes the theory and practice of collaboration, and considers future trends. This highly interactive course uses lectures, guest speakers, case studies, and simulations. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 515 - Enivro Negotiation Mediation

    Credits: 3. Same as COMM 515 and ENST 515. This course prepares students to effectively engage in multiparty negotiation on natural resource and environmental issues. It is grounded in theory and provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in both negotiation and facilitation/mediation. Guest speakers, case studies, and simulations allow students to develop, test, and refine best practices. The course is face-paced, highly interactive, and serves as the second of three required courses in the Natural Resources Conflict Resolution Program. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 524 - Community Forestry & Conservtn

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 424. In-depth examination of agroforestry, community forestry, and opportunities and constraints to the use of trees in rural development and protected areas management. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • NRSM 526 - Climate and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 426. This course applies relevant social and political theory to the problem of climate change and examines the social science of climate change. Cannot get credit for both NRSM 426 and NRSM 526. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • NRSM 532 - Forest Ecosystem Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Graduate standing only. Logical strategies for transforming ecosystem complexity into simplified simulation models with emphasis on space/time scaling and environmental policy relevance. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 560 - Am Wilderness Phil & Policy

    Credits: 4. History of the American Wilderness idea and associated policies, including the Wilderness Act and implementing regulations.  Current management challenges also covered. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 561 - Manag Wilderness Ecosystems

    Credits: 4. Ecosystem science and policies and management practices related to managing specific resources, such as air, wildlife, and water, within wilderness.  Management of non-conforming uses is also covered. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 563 - Wilderness Planning

    Credits: 4. Planning theory and effective plan development, including principles and practices of public involvement.  Includes examination of primary planning frameworks. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 570 - Political Ecology

    Credits: 3. Graduate seminar on key theories, issues and literature in the subfield of Political Ecology, an interdisciplinary environmental social science approach which integrates how political, economic, cultural and ecological processes interact and shape society nature relations. Case examples are drawn from both the North and South. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 571 - Int'l Conserv & Develop

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing. Critical review of selected international natural resource development, conservation and management approaches and experiences. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 575 - Environment & Development

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Co-convened with NRSM 475. Examines key social forces that influence how individuals, groups and nation-states understand and live within their bio-physical environments, especially policies and processes relating to development, corporate capitalism, globalization, culture, class and other forms of power and social relations. Pays close attention to ways both indigenous and introduced resource use and management practices (including conservation) variably impact people of different races, classes, genders, cultures and livelihood practices. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 579 - Collaborative Conservation

    Credits: 3. (R-4) Offered every semester. Same as ENST 579 and LAW 679. Prerequisite, ENST 513 or consent of instructor. Designed as the capstone experience of the Natural Resources Conflict Resolution Program. Provides practical experience in multi-party collaboration and conflict resolution. Students may design their own project in consultation with the director of the NRCR Program, or participate in a project organized and convened by faculty. Projects may be conducted year-round. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-12). Offered intermittently.  Prereq. graduate standing.  Presentations by student, faculty, and associates on issues and topics in their field.   Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 596 - Indepedent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study or research problems. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • NRSM 597 - Graduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Independent graduate research in forest management, wood science, soils, wildlife management, silviculture, recreation and other topic areas. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-12) Offered every term.  Practical application of academic learning in an off-campus placement.  Prior approval must be obtained from faculty supervisor. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term.  Professional paper preparation. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 622 - Advanced Prolems in Env Policy

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years.  Examines environmental policy problems and contemporary issues in environmental policy, law, and administration.  Policy tools, concepts and research resources introduced.  Numerous problems, themes, and issues in environmental policy analyzed.  Readings-based seminar; students lead most reviews and discussions. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 695 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 697 - Graduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Independent graduate research in forest management, wood science, soils, wildlife management, silviculture, recreation and other topic areas. Level: Graduate
  • NRSM 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term.  Thesis/dissertation preparation. Level: Graduate

Parks, Tour & Recreation Mgmt

  • PTRM 355 - Wild. Med. And Risk Mgmt.

    Credits: 5. This course will train students in injury and illness prevention in a backcountry setting while emphasizing risk management principles. The course also trains students in the treatment and long-term management of medical emergencies in the backcountry, including improvised litters and splints. Instructors cover decision making involved in dislocation reduction, medication administration, and evacuation protocols.  Risk management topics include participant screening, emergency response plans, risk matrices, and incident reporting. Co-requisites include HHP 332, Emergency Medical Technician and Incident Management; and PTRM 356, Wilderness Rescue and Survival Skills.
  • PTRM 356 - Wild. Rescue and Survival

    Credits: 5. This course is ideal for outdoor leaders involved in extended backcountry trips and those individuals seeking employment with search and rescue units, ski patrols and wilderness trip leading organizations. Students will be prepared to handle emergencies in high-elevation, winter conditions as well as in tropical and swiftwater environments. They will also be prepared for extended care of patients and rescuers in remote and challenging environments. Students will study navigation including landform interpretation of maps and use of map rulers to determine lat/long and UTM coordinates, as well as practical use of maps, compass and GPS. The course includes 3 days of Swiftwater Rescue training, as well as 3 days of Level I Avalanche training. An overnight, winter rescue scenario typically in conjunction with Missoula County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue team, as well as training in rescue helicopter operations with St. Patrick Hospital’s LifeFlight medics, complete the suite of practical experiences. Co-Requisites include HHP 332, Emergency Medical Technician and Incident Management; and PTRM 355, Wilderness Medicine and Risk Management.
  • PTRM 582 - Concept of Wilderness & PA

    Credits: 3. (R-3). Offered autumn. Theoretical and philosophical imperatives for the establishment of different forms of parks, wilderness and protected areas.  In-depth discussion of the objectives and purposes for management of these areas, and of the current criticisms and attacks on their intellectual foundation.  Level: Graduate

Writing

  • WRIT 222 - Technical Approach to Writing

    Credits: 2. Offered every term. Restricted to majors in Forsetry, Resource Management, Park and Recreation, Wilderness Studies, and Wildlife Biology. Emphasis on strategy, style and tone in effective technical prose. Traditions of technical writing and how to adopt a wide range of tones and styles in writing various technical documents to diverse audiences. Focus on more effective technical sentences, paragraphs and larger writing components. Assignments include analyses, summaries, employment documents, research reports, case studies and editing/revision exercises.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate

Nat Resourc Science & Mgmt

  • NRSM 373 - Wilderness and Civilization

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Social and cultural perspectives on the wilderness idea and wildland practices. Course topics include history of wilderness and the wilderness movement, various philosophical viewpoints on wilderness, protected area management issues, and how wilderness fits into larger landscapes and societies. Part of the Wilderness and Civilization program.
  • NRSM 405 - Mgt of Wilderness Resource

    Credits: 4. An ecology-based treatment of wilderness management.  Brief overview of fundamental ecological principles followed by an examination of their specific and often unique applications to wilderness ecosystems.  Presentation of basic wilderness management principles and guidelines.  Discussion of nonconforming wilderness uses.
  • NRSM 406 - Wilderness Mgt Planning

    Credits: 3. Exploration of basic planning theory, concepts, effective plan writing, and the characteristics of successful planning and implementation.  In-depth treatment of the Limits of Acceptable Change planning framework.  Comparison and evaluation of the different planning approaches used by the four wilderness managing agencies.
  • NRSM 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors; new courses or one time offerings of current topics.

Parks, Tour & Recreation Mgmt

  • PTRM 150 - Current Issues in PTRM

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. This course will explore issues related to recreation and tourism in western Montana. This is a field based course designed to get students outside the classroom. Students will have a chance to visit outdoor recreation areas and meet recreation and tourism managers.
  • PTRM 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PTRM 210S - Nature Tourism & Comm Rec

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to the tourism and commercial recreation industries. Provides initial link between the natural environment and business operations. Combination of introductory business philosophies, economics, and natural resource management into a framework for future reference and course work.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • PTRM 217S - Parks & Outdoor Rec. Mgmt.

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. The management of land as an environment for outdoor recreation. Understanding the relationship between the visitor, resource base and management policies. Recreation planning on multiple use forest lands, parks, wilderness areas and private lands.
  • PTRM 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PTRM 300 - Recreation Behavior

    Credits: 3. Offere spring. Prereq., PTRM 217S. This course provides an understanding of recreation behavior in wildland and nature-based tourism oriented settings. Students will learn about theories/conceptual frameworks from social and environmental psychology and their application to visitor management issues in the wildland recreation and nature-base tourism fields.
  • PTRM 310 - Nat Res Interp and Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., COMX 111A or THTR 120A, junior or senior standing in PTRM or RECM. Principles, concepts, techniques essential to providing high quality interpretive programs in natural or cultural history.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Upper-Division
  • PTRM 345X - Sustaining Human Soc & Nat Env

    Credits: 3 TO 6. Offered Winter and Summer. These field-based, experiential classes focus on the environmental and conservation concerns, as well as the modern and traditional cultures, of Australia, New Zealand, or Fiji.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • PTRM 353 - Tourism & Sustnbility Mountain

    Credits: 3. Offered summer only. Coreq. NRSM 352.  In this course we will explore the opportunities and challenges of development with particular reference to nature-based tourism and sustainability in an isolated but rapidly globalizing region of the Himalaya. Students will learn through extensive readings, class discussions, direct field experience (including living in a remote mountain village), meetings with development officials, sustainability activists and stakeholders in the region.
  • PTRM 380 - Rec Admin & Leadership

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The theories, principles and practices that shape the administration of recreation opportunities offered through public, nonprofit and private agencies and organizations. Course content includes leadership roles of recreation managers, organizational structure, management, legality, risk management, staffing, communication and public relations.
  • PTRM 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PTRM 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • PTRM 394 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-4) Offered intermittently. Variable topics by visiting scholars.
  • PTRM 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PTRM 407 - Mnging Rec Res in Wilderness

    Credits: 3. Examination of strategies to management recreation in a wilderness setting. Addresses management of visitor use and experiences, measuring and monitoring biophysical and social impacts, effective education and interpretation, and law enforcement. 
  • PTRM 418 - Winter Wilderness Field Stdies

    Credits: 3. Examination of wilderness values, management issues and strategies, winter ecology and snow science, risk management and group leadership, and traditional skills.  Winter field course in the Swan Valley and Mission Mountains Wilderness.  Offered wintersession.
  • PTRM 450 - Pre-Practicum Prof Prep

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. A pre-practicum class to provide orientation for the practicum, PTRM 495 (RECM 460).
  • PTRM 451 - Tourism & Sustainability

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., PTRM 210, or consent of instructor. Theories and conceptual models are applied to analyzing relationships between the integration of planning theories to sustainability concepts.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • PTRM 482 - Wilderness & Protctd Area Mgt

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., PTRM 217S, or consent of instructor. Examination of the origin, evolution, and application of the park concept on state, federal, and international levels. Evaluation of legislation, philosophy, and policy leading to consideration of goals, objectives, and strategies for wilderness and protected area management.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • PTRM 484 - PTRM Field Measurement Tech

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Co-req. with either PTRM 485 or PTRM 451. Field measurement and management techniques critical in park, tourism & recreation management. Includes measurement of impacts on biophysical and social attributes of park, tourism & recreation settings.
  • PTRM 485 - Recreation Planning

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., PTRM 217S and PTRM 300. Offered autumn. Needs of recreation opportunities and response to those needs through planning, demand assessment and resource analysis.
  • PTRM 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PTRM 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study of research problems.
  • PTRM 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 4. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior standing in wildlife biology or consent of instr. Analysis and discussion led by students of current topics in wildlife biology.
  • PTRM 495 - Practicum in PTRM

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., PTRM 380, PTRM 450, senior standing, and consent of instr. Supervised pre-professional practice in approved parks, tourism & recreation management agencies.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PTRM 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty advisor and Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PTRM 499 - Senior Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr.; senior standing.  Preparation of major paper based on study or research of a topic selected with an advisor according to needs and objectives of student.
  • PTRM 500 - Conserv Social Sci Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., a course in statistics or consent of instr. The nature of scientific research, planning research projects, organization and presentation of research results.  Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 517 - Advanced Visitor Mgmt

    Credits: 3. Managing visitors in protected areas is an increasingly important. The U.S. National Park Service, for example, receives about 275 million visits per year. These visits impact both the parks and society on numerous levels. Many of the most perplexing issues associated with Protected Area Management are also visitor experience or access related. Visitors are managed to fulfill mandates, build constituencies for protected areas, generate income and improve the human condition. In the past four decades several visitor management strategies and tactics have been developed and evaluated. Examples of these strategies include changing physical places or facilities to accommodate use, changing the character of uses and visitors, emphasizing education or law enforcement, developing concessions etc. Within those broad strategies are also numerous tactics that have been tried in numerous contexts. Charging user fees, rationing use, using passive vs. active interventions into the visitor experience are tactical examples. In our globalizing profession these strategies and tactics are being challenged to perform within the context of a variety of governance and institutional arrangements. While most approaches were developed for public land settings, they are now being used on private lands, in communal settings, or in areas of international importance. The central challenge of this course is to analyze the effectiveness and appropriateness of visitor management strategies for a variety of issues and in a variety of institutional contexts. To be sure our efforts connect both theoretical and applied perspectives, we will use a single case for the organization of the course. That case is developing a visitor management plan for the Going to the Sun Road Corridor in Glacier National Park. This is a real process that the professor is cooperatively involved with. We will meet one or two times per week depending on the needs of the group. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 554 - Geographies of Tourism

    Credits: 3. Consent of Instructor. This graduate level course will focus on geographic concepts such as place, space, and scale and their applications in tourism research. We will also cover spatial analysis techniques and their uses in tourism studies. The course will begin with an introduction to geography and its importance in tourism studies. Next, background on concepts and theories developed within the field of geography will be provided. From there we will begin to discuss ideas of space, place, landscapes and scale. In our discussion of scale we will focus on the politics of scale and ideas of globalization and the global-local nexus. This will lead into a discussion of networks and flows as they apply to tourism. We will also explore political geographies and gendered landscapes as they apply to tourism. Finally, we will explore some spatial analysis techniques used by geographers studying tourism. The course materials will be structured to give students information on how each topic is conceptualized by geographers, current theoretical debates relating to the topic and its applications in tourism research. The course will rely heavily on current literature, mainly from peer-reviewed journals and book chapters. Students will be expected to engage with these concepts through the literature in writing and discussion. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 562 - Manage Rec Res Wilderness

    Credits: 3. Same as FORS 562.  Current research, theory, and management approaches to recreation management in wilderness, including monitoring and management of visitor impacts and experiences. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 574 - Perspectives in Human Dimen

    Credits: 3. Consent of instructor. This course will provide graduate students with an understanding of multiple perspectives in human dimensions of natural resources. The course is intended to be broad in nature in order to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the topics. Students will read and discuss foundational pieces by Orr and Leopold (among others) and explore newer readings on current research. The course will cover social psychological and sociological perspectives and discuss key issues such as scale, multidisciplinary research, sustainability and social diversity in natural resources. Students will be challenged to approach natural resources issues from multiple perspectives, not just the perspective they are most familiar with. Students will be able to communicate effectively among social scientists and be able to integrate diverse perspectives. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 583 - Research & Dev. Tourism & Rec.

    Credits: 3. This course will use Montana as a case study to understand tourism and recreation research and the tourism and recreation industry. From an applied research prospective, students will learn the intricacies of how to design a research program to support a tourism and recreation industry where the data and decision making tools for marketing professionals, land managers, planners, and political entities are generated. How do you build your relationships, work with advisory councils, pick your issues to study, design your methodologies, collect and analyze data, and tell the story so it is applicable to the industry yet objective and science driven? Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 594 - Conservation Soc Sci Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-3) Offered Spring.  Same as NRSM 594.  Prereq. graduate standing.  Presentations by students, faculty, and associates on issues and topics in their field.    Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual study or research problems. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • PTRM 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing. Independent graduate research in parks, tourism, and recreation management. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty advisor and Internship Services office. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PTRM 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Preparation of professional paper. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 695 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PTRM 697 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • PTRM 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing. Preparation of thesis/dissertation. Level: Graduate

Recreation Management

  • RECM 405 - Manage Wilderness Res

    Credits: 4. An ecology-based treatment of wilderness management. Brief overview of fundamental ecological principles followed by an examination of their specifice and often unique application to wilderness ecosystems. Presentation of basic wilderness management principles and guidelines. Discussion of nonconforming wilderness uses.

Health Professions and Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical /Pharmaceutical Sci

  • BMED 545 - Research Lab Rotations

    Credits: 2 TO 3. (R 6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., BMED 443 or graduate standing. Experience in research methods in departmental research laboratories. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 581 - Research Seminar Biomed

    Credits: 1. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Oral and written presentations of experimental research results and selected literature topics in biomedical science. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 582 - Research Seminar Neurosci.

    Credits: 1. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Oral and written presentations of experimental research results and selected literature topics in neuroscience. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 583 - Research Seminar Toxicol

    Credits: 1. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Oral and written presentations of experimental research results and selected literature topics in toxicology. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 593 - Current Research Literature

    Credits: 1. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Readings and discussion of current research literature. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R 6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior or graduate standing. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., senior or graduate standing. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered every term. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 597 - Research (MS)

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 10) Offered every term. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 599 - Thesis (MS)

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 10) Offered every term. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 605 - Biomedical Research Ethics

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Overview of biomedical research ethics and regulations. Topics include ethics and morality in science, scientific integrity, conflicts of interest, human and animal experimentation, intellectual property, plagiarism. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 609 - Biomedical Statistics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Experimental design and statistical analysis relevant to the biomedical sciences. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 610 - Neuropharmacology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BMED 613 or 661 or consent of instr. Focus on current areas of research and research technologies in neuropharmacology. Development of presentations and research grant proposals. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 613 - Pharmacology I

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOC 380 or equiv. Fundamentals of pharmacology and drug action. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 614 - Pharmacology II

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., BMED 613. Fundamentals of pharmacology and drug action. Continuation of BMED 613. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 615 - Molecular Pharmacology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., consent of instr. Focus on the basic theories, principles, and practical implications of receptor pharmacology to quantify drug activity. Major emphasis in pharmacodynamics with some time devoted to related pharmacokinetic parameters. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 620 - Cardiovas Pharm & Tox

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BMED 613 or 641, or consent of instr. Recent advances in pharmacology and toxicology of the cardiovascular system. In-depth study of regulatory mechanisms and the effect of immune response and xenobiotics on cardiovascular function. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 621 - Drug Design

    Credits: 4. Offered alternate years. Prereq., Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry or consent of instr. Introduction to the main concepts in medicinal chemistry. Laboratory experience in instrumental analysis, interpreting NMR, MS cleavage, and structure elucidation Level: Graduate
  • BMED 622 - Drug Pharmacodynamics

    Credits: 4. Offered alternate years. Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry or consent of instr. Introduction and topical coverage of how drugs form complexes with biological targets to cause an array of responses. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 623 - Drug Diversity

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry or consent of instr. Topics in chemogenomics and diversity oriented synthesis will be covered. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 624 - Methods in Medicinal Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., Organic chemistry and biochemistry or consent of instr. Novel approaches to small molecule therapeutics for disease targeting. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 625 - Drug Synthesis

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An introduction to the past and current synthetic approaches and total syntheses of biologically active drugs. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 626 - Res Meth Biochem Pharm

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Laboratory course intended to familiarize students with the instruments, and expertise of current research techniques in the biomedical sciences. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 627 - Professional Development

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry or consent of instr. Developmental training in presentations, writing, reviewing, literature research, teaching, research methods, grant writing, ethics, and business aspects in medicinal chemistry. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 628 - Grantsmanship

    Credits: 1. This course is designed to provide graduate students and postdoctoral fellows with the necessary background, tools and hands on experience to be able to confidently write and submit a research grant. The focus is on preparing a fellowship application although training will be provided for more typical investigator initiated grants. The entire process from conception, preparation, review and revision will be covered. This course will be a requirement for students on training grants. No prerequisites are required. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 630 - Pharmacogenetics

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BIOC 380 or 481. The genetic basis of differential drug activity. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 632 - Advanced Pharmacokinetics

    Credits: 4. Offered Fall. Recent developments and emerging concepts in theoretical and experimental pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, and drug disposition. Critical analysis of the current literature. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 637 - Topics in Pharm Sci

    Credits: 1. (R-12) Offered autumn and spring. Current topics in the pharmaceutical sciences, including pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, medicinal chemistry, and drug design and development. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 641 - Toxicology I-Principles

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOC 481 or equiv. Introduction to toxicology. Topics include general principles, risk assessment, organ system toxicology, introduction to carcinogenesis, and genetic toxicology. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 642 - Toxicology II-Agents

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BMED 641. Toxic agents and the diseases caused by those agents. Includes common toxicants in the environment and occupational settings as well as drug induced toxicity. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 643 - Cellular & Molecular Tox

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BMED 641. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Includes apoptosis, regulation of cell cycle, genetic toxicology, and signal transduction pathways in toxicity. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 644 - Immunopharm/Immunotox

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., MICB 410 or equiv. The impacts of xenobiotic agents on the immune system. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 645 - Respiratory Toxicology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BMED 641. The lung and associated immune systems and their response to inhaled immunogenic and toxicological agents. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 646 - Neurotoxicology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BMED 641 or 661. Mechanisms of major neurotoxins and neurological disease. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 647 - Topics in Toxicology

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., BMED 613, or 641, or 661. Current topics in toxicology. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 657 - Topics in Immunology

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., MICB 410 or equiv. Current topics in immunology. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 661 - Neuroscience I

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOC 380 or equiv. Overview of the structure and function of the nervous system. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 662 - Neuroscience II

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., BMED 661. Fundamentals of developmental neuroscience, behavioral and cognitive neuroscience and computational neuroscience. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 667 - Topics in Neurobiology

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every year. Prereq., BMED 661. Current topics in neuroscience. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 668 - Neuropathology

    Credits: 4. Prereq., BMED 347 or BMED 661. This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the pathological findings in neurological disease, and their biological basis. This course will provide neuroscience graduate students with a clear description of molecular and cellular processes and reactions that are relevant to the normal and abnormal functioning of the nervous system. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 694 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R 6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., senior or graduate standing. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 697 - Research (PhD)

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-50) Offered every term. Level: Graduate
  • BMED 699 - Dissertation (PhD)

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-50) Offered every term. Level: Graduate

Pharmacy

  • PHAR 110N - Use & Abuse of Drugs

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Drug dependence and abuse.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • PHAR 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R 16) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • PHAR 324 - Medicinal Plants

    Credits: 2 TO 3. Offered autumn. Same as AAHS 324. Plants and other natural substances which nourish, heal, injure, or alter the conscious mind.
  • PHAR 328 - Antimicrobial Agents

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOM 400. Chemical characteristics, biochemical mechanisms, and pharmacological properties of drugs used in treating infections caused by microorganisms.
  • PHAR 331 - Pharmaceutics

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 222, first professional year standing. Physical pharmacy and dosage forms.
  • PHAR 341 - Physiological Systems I

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 222, PHSX 205N, BIOB 260/261. Principles of anatomy, normal and abnormal physiology.
  • PHAR 342 - Physiological Systems II

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 341. Continuation of 341.
  • PHAR 361 - Pharm Sci Lab I

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Coreq., PHAR 300, PHAR 341. Laboratory experience in the pharmaceutical sciences.
  • PHAR 362 - Pharm Sci Lab II

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 361; coreq., PHAR 331 and 342. Continuation of 361.
  • PHAR 371 - Integrated Studies I

    Credits: 1. Prereq., first professional year standing in pharmacy. Small group conferences designed to develop professional skills while integrating material from other pharmacy courses.
  • PHAR 372 - Integrated Studies II

    Credits: 1. Prereq., PHAR 371. Continuation of 371.
  • PHAR 381 - Pharmaceutical Biochemistry

    Credits: 4. Offered every Autumn.  Prereq., admission to Pharmacy School.  Fundamental biochemistry from a pharmaceutical sciences perspective; management of genetic information, molecular structure and function, and metabolic reactions, especially as relating to drug actions and targets.
  • PHAR 390 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual participation in library or laboratory research.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • PHAR 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PHAR 421 - Medicinal Chem I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  The chemistry of organic compounds used medicinally and their biochemical mechanisms of action.
  • PHAR 422 - Medicinal Chem II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BMED 421. Continuation of 421.
  • PHAR 430 - Pharmacogenetics

    Credits: 2. Offered each semester online. Prereq., BMED 421, 432. The genetic basis of differential drug activity.
  • PHAR 432 - Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Principles of pharmacokinetics including the processes of ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination) and applications in the clinical setting.
  • PHAR 443 - Pharmacol & Toxicol I

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., second professional year standing. Basic principles of pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics.
  • PHAR 444 - Pharmacology & Toxicol II

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., BMED 443. Continuation of 443.
  • PHAR 445 - Immunopharm/Immunotox

    Credits: 3. Offered in alternating years. Prereq., consent of instr. This course is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate students and professional Pharmacy students to various aspects involved in the development and mechanisms of action of immunomodulatory drugs and chemicals.
  • PHAR 484 - Introduction to Toxicology

    Credits: 3. Offered every autumn. Prereq., Biology, Chemistry, and Biochemistry; or consent of instructor. Online instruction provides students with a comprehensive introduction to environmental health and the principles of toxicology. Included: Human toxic substance exposure, processing of toxic substances and the impact on cells and tissues including genetic and epigenetic factors. Graduate increment includes design of a research study in toxicology and leading class
  • PHAR 485 - Environmental Health

    Credits: 3. Offered every spring. Prereq., Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Intro. Toxicology; or consent of instructor. Online instruction for the principles, concepts and applications of environmental health. Included: Methods and paradigm used in the field ranging from ecology to epidemiology, from toxicology to environmental psychology, from genetics to ethics. This course will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to environmental health. This includes an overview of the methods and paradigms used in the field, ranging from ecology to epidemiology, from toxicology to environmental psychology, and from genetics to ethics.
  • PHAR 486 - Epidem Translational

    Credits: 3. Offered every Autumn. Prereq., Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Statistics, and Intro. Toxicology; or consent of instructor. Online instruction to introduce the principles and methods for epidemiologic and clinical investigation, including biostatistical applications. Students will learn to conduct and interpret epidemiological and clinical studies on environmental toxicology. Graduate increment includes design and analysis of an epidemiological study and leading class discussions.
  • PHAR 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Individual participation in library or laboratory research.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • PHAR 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • PHAR 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Varying topics.
  • PHAR 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.

Public Health

  • PUBH 510 - Intro to Epidemiology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation, descriptive and analytic epidemiology techniques, disease frequency, risk determination, study designs, causality, and validity. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 511 - History & Theory Epidemiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. This graduate course covers the basic science of public health. Major schools of epidemiology from the Greek, Italian and English traditions will be compared and contrasted Basic concepts and terminology will be introduced and major pandemics used to illustrate the evolution of the field. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 512 - Neuroepidemiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. An overview of the fundamental considerations of the history, scope, and methods of neuroepidemiology as a subfield of epidemiology. Specific neurologic diseases and injuries will be studied as to distribution and risk factors, as well as the relationship to international public health. Level: Graduate
  • PUBH 515 - Public Health Genetics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. Basic principles of genetics and genomics, application to public health practices and research. Includes issues in public health genetics such as informed consent, screening for genetic susceptibility, and ethical, legal and social implications. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 520 - Fundamentals of Biostatistics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. This course is designed for graduate students and practitioners in public health, biomedical sciences, and related fields.  The course introduces basic vocabulary, concepts, and methods of biostatistics.  The goal is to provide an introduction to how biostatistics works.  Topics will include descriptive statistics, probability,  random variables,  probability distributions,  statistical inference,  chi-square analysis,  linear regression, and correlation. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 525 - Multi/Native American Pub Hlth

    Credits: 3. Offered Autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. This course is designed to provide general overview of multicultural issues within the United States and specifically within Montana. The course will provide overview information about health disparities within the nation and how these disparities disproportionately impact ethnic minority populations. Montana's largest minority population is native American tribal communities. As a result, much of the course will incorporate advanced knowledge and topics relating to regional health disparities facing Native American communities. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 530 - Pub Hlth Admin and Mangmnt

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. Overview of public health and health care systems; organizational structures, functions, authorities, policies and procedures; programmatic budgeting, operations, and prioritizations; program performance reporting and improvement; grants and contracts; informatics; human relations and negotiation; management and leadership; and business planning. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 531 - Leadership in Public Health

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., PUBH 530 or consent of instr. This course deepens the student’s knowledge and understanding of the role of public health leaders in the community whether in forming partnerships between public health agencies or with private entities. This course begins by building an understanding of the principles of leadership, explores the applications of leadership to public health, develops the relationship between leadership skills and competencies, studies the role of leadership in evaluation and research and concludes with a look at public health now versus how it could be in the future. Level: Graduate
  • PUBH 535 - Health Policy

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. The evolution and intersection of international, federal, state, and local public health policy. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 540 - Social & Behav Sci in Pub Hlth

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Open to PUBH majors only. Behavioral and social factors relevant to the identification and solution of public health problems, principles of health behavior change, applications, and assessment of interventions. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 548 - Issues in Mental &Child Health

    Credits: 3. Offered Summer. Prereq., Public Health majors. This course provides an overview of maternal and child health problems, programs, and policies. Using the life-course perspective, this course examines the social determinants of health and development of women, infants, children and adolescents. Students will become familiar with the epidemiology of maternal and childhood diseases and assess the resources and interventions used to combat them. Level: Graduate.
  • PUBH 550 - Progrm Eval & Res Meth

    Credits: 3. Offered every odd summer. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., PUBH 510 or equiv. and consent of instr. Covers purpose statements, standards, study designs, sampling, measurement, methods for data collection and analysis, interpretation, and report preparation. Models of evaluation described, and similarities and differences between research and evaluation methods explored. Level: Graduate
  • PUBH 560 - Environmental & Rural Health

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Relationship of people to their physical environment, how this relationship impacts health, and efforts to minimize negative health effects. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 570 - Ethical Issues in Public Hlth

    Credits: 3. Offered summer. Open to PUBH majors only. Focus on the values and moral issues that underlie U.S. public health policies. Course examines ethical decision making in areas such as policy development, research, environmental health, occupational health, resource allocation, and genetics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 580 - Rural Health Iss Global Contxt

    Credits: 3. Offered summer. Open to PUBH majors only. Focus on rural concerns and global influences on public health. Covers trends in global health, global health policies, players, priorities, human rights, health equity, and mobile and vulnerable populations. Students will be introduced to health research methods and design, which will be used to analyze rural and global health issues. Emphasize the science and art of epidemiological strategies to answer specific health questions. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 591 - Practicum

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., consent of instructor. Semester long, supervised graduate practicum in a health science setting, followed by an oral defense.  Offered credit/no credit only. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 593 - Professional Portfolio

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., PUBH 591 and PUBH 599, consent of instructor. Integrates the student’s practice experience and knowledge gained through course work, practicum, and possibly professional papers and research with the goals and learning objectives of the M.P.H. program into a portfolio. Students will present and defend their portfolio to illustrate their growth as a professional public health practitioner at the end of their M.P.H. program.  Offered credit/no credit only. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Open to PUBH majors only. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.  Previous topics have included Global Health and Epidemiology of Infectious Disease. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., admission to the M.P.H., program and consent of instructor. Supervised readings, research, or public health practice. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 597 - Research

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., admission to the M.P.H. program and consent of instructor. With the guidance of their faculty advisor, students will develop a written proposal specific to the goals of their research project, and carry out the project. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program
  • PUBH 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Open to PUBH majors only. Prereq., consent of instructor. Students will write and submit an original research paper to a peer-reviewed public health or medical journal. Students may also fulfill the professional paper requirement by presenting a conference paper or conference poster to a local, regional, or national \meeting.  Offered credit/no credit only. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Public Health Program

Allied Health: Health Sciences

  • AHHS 582 - Implementing Value Based System Change in Rehabilitation

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn, spring, summer. Prereq. Enrolled in the Rehabilitation Business Administration Certificate. Enhance the learner’s appreciation of the management, data, and system skills needed to successfully innovate and implement necessary value based practice changes to compete in the changing rehabilitation healthcare landscape. Level: Graduate
  • AHHS 584 - Leadership to Develop Innovative Clinical Practice for Value Based Care

    Credits: 2. This course will explore the drivers of health care reform, the key strategies to implement value based care. The required leadership and organizational characteristics to support innovations and transformative health care. Level: Graduate
  • AHHS 599 - System Skills to Thrive in a Changing Health Care Environment - Capstone Project

    Credits: 4. This course will culminate in a capstone project describing the concept of system skills (ie., intrinsic interest in data, the ability to devise solutions to problems identified by the data; and understanding of how to implement practice innovations on a large scale) with relevance to physical therapy practice. The course has three components 1) the importance of measurement and the resultant systems data, 2) the concept of ‘positive deviants’ and provides case examples of innovators who are using systems data to solve clinical challenges, and 3) performance of a capstone project by the student related to their clinical issue. Level: Graduate

Physical Therapy

  • P T 503 - PT and Health Care System

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. An introduction to physical therapy and its relationship to the health care system. Topics include introduction to PT as a profession, medical terminology, medical records, teaching and learning, ethics, laws and professional issues in physical therapy. Level: Graduate
  • P T 510 - Applied Clinical Anatomy

    Credits: 5. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. Anatomy of the neuromusculoskeletal system and body cavities in relation to movement and function with clinical correlates. Course lab fee. Level: Graduate
  • P T 516 - Movement System Exam & Eval

    Credits: 5. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. Principles of musculoskeletal examination and evaluation including posture, neurologic screen, palpation, measurement of ROM and muscle performance, assessment of muscle length, and joint play. Level: Graduate
  • P T 519 - Musculoskeletal Management I

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. Principles of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation, and intervention. The focus is application of anatomic and biomechanical principles when examining posture and movement, identification of abnormal movement patterns, and analysis of underlying neuromuscular impairments. Level: Graduate
  • P T 520 - Development Through Life Span

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor.Presentation of changes in adults they progress through the lifespan. Includes the functional changes associated with aging, assessing and managng fall risk, performance and interpretation of functional outcome measures. Level: Graduate
  • P T 523 - Clin Med I: Intro to Med

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. Introduction to medical screening within the patient/client meanagment model. Level: Graduate
  • P T 524 - Clin Med II Intro to Med

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program or permission of instructor. Introduction to pharmacology, medical management of selected orthopedic and hematological conditions. Level: Graduate
  • P T 525 - Clin Med III

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Pathophysiology, medical and pharmacological management of hepatic, oncological, immunological diseases and organ transplantation. Level: Graduate
  • P T 526 - Foundat Skills & Interv

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Basic skills of transfers, bed mobility, gait assistive device use, and soft tissue mobilization. Level: Graduate
  • P T 527 - Physical & Electrophys Agents

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Physiology, indications, contraindications, and application of electrotherapy and physical agents. Theory and application of electrodiagnostic and electrotherapeutic procedures. Level: Graduate
  • P T 529 - Biomechanics

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Principles of biomechanics and application to physical therapy. Level: Graduate
  • P T 530 - Clin Appl Ex Phys

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor.. Principles and applications of the physiological adaptations to acute and chronic exercise stresses, exercise assessment/testing, prescription and progression of the exercise program, and the adaptations of exercise interventions in the clinical environment. Basic principles and application of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF). Level: Graduate
  • P T 536 - Neurosciences

    Credits: 5. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Anatomy of the head and neck, and neuroanatomy of the human nervous system with emphasis on evaluation of central nervous system lesions and pathological conditions, clinical applications to physical therapy. Level: Graduate
  • P T 560 - Clinical Reasoning I

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Introduction to the clinical reasoning process in physical therapy, faculty research and scholarship options, and laboratory orientation. Level: Graduate
  • P T 563 - Cardiopulmonary PT

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Cardiovascular and pulmonary pathology, pharmacology, and differential diagnosis. Physical therapy assessment and interventions for patients with cardiovascular and/or pulmonary disease. Level: Graduate
  • P T 565 - PT for Children

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Normal development throughout childhood. Physical therapy examination, Eevaluation and intervention of children with neuromotor and musculoskeletal physical therapy rehabilitation of childrendysfunction including. Pphysical therapy for children in school systems. Level: Graduate
  • P T 567 - Neurorehabilitation I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Neurologic physical therapy assessment and intervention of adults. principles of neuroplasticity, motor control, motor learning and application to physical therapy neurorehabilitation. Includes wheelchair seating and mobility assessment and prescription. Level: Graduate
  • P T 568 - Neurorehab II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Neurologic physical therapy assessment and intervention of adults. Principles of NeuroPlasticity, Motor control, motor learning and application to physical therapy neurorehabilitation. Includes assessment and treatment of vestibular system and conditions. Neurologic physical therapy assessment and intervention of adults with traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, degenerative neurological conditions, neurological diseases. Also includes assessment and treatment of vestibular system and conditions. Level: Graduate
  • P T 569 - Musculoskeletal Mgt II

    Credits: 5. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Principles of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation, and intervention for the hip, knee, ankle, foot, and lumbar spine. Level: Graduate
  • P T 570 - Psych of Illness & Disabil

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Psychologicalsocial response to illness and disability to include patient motivation and, patient/professional interaction, and treatment of for persons with chronic paindisability throughout the lifespan. Level: Graduate
  • P T 572 - Practice & Administration

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Practice management and operations explored with emphasis on strategic planning, human resource management, regulatory compliance/risk management, quality improvement and coding payment. Level: Graduate
  • P T 573 - Musculoskeletal Mgt III

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Principles of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation, and intervention for the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), thoracic and cervical spine. Level: Graduate
  • P T 576 - Clinical Reasoning II

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. This course will build on the foundations established in Clinical Reasoning I. Issues related to clinical and research ethics will be discussed. The principles of evidence based practice (EBP), including the application of evidence and the creation of evidence, will be part of the discussion. Limitations of EBP and it role in the changing health care environment, critical appraisal of the literature, statistical knowledge, and weighing evidence for clinical decision making will be presented. A writing assignment, application of debate/persuasive argument techniques, and collaborative group exercise will be a part of this course. Level: Graduate
  • P T 577 - App Clin Teaching in PT

    Credits: 1 TO 2. Offered autumn. Teaching experience in practical application of clinical therapy. Level: Graduate
  • P T 578 - PT for Select Populations

    Credits: 6. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Physical therapy assessment and interventions are addressed in the areas of occupational health, pregnancy and pelvic floor dysfunction, wound management and prosthetic management. This course also addresses the needs and concerns of special populations including recreational and sporting opportunities. Level: Graduate
  • P T 582 - Clinical Experience

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. A mix of classroom and clinical experiences to introduce students to the expectations of professional practice. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 583 - Integrated Clinical Experience-Orthopedic Physical Therapy

    Credits: 2. Offered atumn and spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. An integrated, part-time clinical experience with emphasis on patient evaluation, treatment, and professional development. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 584 - Integrated Clinical Experience-Neurologic Physical Therapy

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. An integrated, part-time clinical experience with emphasis on patient evaluation, treatment, and professional development. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 587 - Clinical Internship I

    Credits: 4. Offered summer. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Eight weeks of full-time clinical experience with emphasis on developing patient evaluation and treatment skills. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 589 - Clinical Internship II

    Credits: 5. Offered summer. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Eight weeks of full-time clinical experience with emphasis on learning about administrative issues, problem solving, time management, and communication skills. Continuation of development of patient treatment and evaluation skills. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1. Offered summer. Prereq., Successful completion of all prior clinical experiences, and previous DPT coursework. Eight weeks of full-time clinical experience with emphasis on learning about administrative issues, problem solving, time management, and communication skills. Continuation of development of patient treatment and evaluation skills. Only CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 626 - Clin Med IV

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Course will focus on the role of the physical therapist in a Direct Access environment. Pathology, differential screening, pharmacotherapeutics, evaluation and management of integumentary, gastrointestinal, endocrine/metabolic and urogenital disease. Course will address abdominal and dermatological screening. Level: Graduate
  • P T 627 - Prevention & Wellness Educ

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Nutrition, health promotion, patient and support network education, exercise/fitness, disease and injury prevention, life span emphasis. Level: Graduate
  • P T 628 - PT Student Clinic

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Open to 2nd and 3rd year DPT students. Supervised service learning experience for students providing physical therapy rehabilitation and wellness activities to individuals without health insurance. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • P T 641 - Introduction to Health-Focused Lifestyle Intervention

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq. must be enrolled in HFLI certificate program. Introduces students to Health-Focused Lifestyle Interventions [HFLI] and builds the context for physical-therapist led lifestyle intervention teams to include, exploring the public health context for HFLI teams, identifying target patient populations, and presenting the core competencies required to participate in and lead HFLI teams. Level: Graduate
  • P T 642 - Defining Framework for Measuring, Planning and Delivering Health-Focused Lifestyle Interventions

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq., must be Enrolled in HFLI certificate program and prerq., or coreq., of PT 641 required. Introduces students to health belief and behavior models as well as a structured methodology for assessment of health status for individuals and at a community level. Level: Graduate
  • P T 643 - Principles of Interpersonal and Organizational Health Coaching

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq., must be enrolled in HFLI certificate program and PT 641 and PT 642 required. Introduction to health coaching principles, motivational interviewing, and the influence of health belief and behavior models on developing individual and community level action plans. Level: Graduate
  • P T 644 - Competencies for Health-Focused Lifestyle Intervention [HFLI] Teams

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq., must be enrolled in a PT program and PT 641, PT 642. Provides students with an overview of the knowledge, skills, and abilities in four specific content areas that are important for ensuring success of physical therapist led HFLI teams. Level: Graduate
  • P T 645 - Developing a Health-Focused Lifestyle Intervention Business Plan

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq., must be enrolled in HFLI certificate program and PT 641, PT 642, PT 643, and PT 644 required. Guides students through a structured process to develop an achievable strategic plan for a physical therapist-led HFLI program or business. Level: Graduate
  • P T 649 - Health-Focused Lifestyle Intervention Capstone Experience

    Credits: 2. Offered spring, autumn. Prereq., must be enrolled in HFLI certificate program and PT 641, PT 642, PT 643, PT 644, and PT 645 required. Provides students with an onsite capstone experience that is designed to provide students the opportunity to interact with faculty in a variety of classes, discussions and presentations. Students will also present their business plans to and receive feedback from faculty with significant HFLI business experience. Level: Graduate
  • P T 650 - Screening for Medical Disorder

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq. Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum. PT’s role, responsibilities, and decision-making processes regarding appropriate referral of a patient to a physician for evaluation of medical conditions outside the scope of physical therapy. Level: Graduate
  • P T 651 - Med Imaging in Rehabilitation

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, summer. Prereq. Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum. Provide the physical therapy clinical learner with the tools needed to interpret and apply specialized medical imaging information to the rehabilitation patient. Level: Graduate
  • P T 652 - Pharmacology in Rehab

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq., in a PT curriculum. Provide clinical learners with the primary drug classes and the physiologic basis of their action. Level: Graduate
  • P T 653 - Legal and Ethical Issues

    Credits: 1. Offered spring, summer. Prereq. Enrolled in a PT curriculum. Foundational information as to the legal, ethical and administrative decision making process often facing physical therapists in clinical practice. Level: Graduate
  • P T 654 - Clinical Decision Making

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq. Enrolled in a PT curriculum. Provide ways to utilize the Guide to PT Practice for effective and efficient clinical decision making. Level: Graduate
  • P T 655 - Business and Marketing

    Credits: 2. Offered spring, summer. Prereq. Enrolled in a PT curriculum. Enhance the PT clinical learner’s appreciation of business and management practices needed to succeed within the current healthcare landscape. Level: Graduate
  • P T 656 - Coding and Reimbursement

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn, summer. Prereq. Enrolled in a PT curriculum. Educate the clinical learner in analyzing reimbursement of current billing, accounts receivable, collection procedures and use of proper coding. Level: Graduate
  • P T 657 - Professionalism

    Credits: 2. Prereq. Enrolled in a PT curriculum. This seminar course provides the clinical learner with the opportunity to analyze and discuss the roles/responsibilities and challenges/opportunities inherent in doctoral level physical therapy practice. Only CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 658 - Critical Assessment

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn, spring. Prereq. Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum. Develop skills in the application of evidence-based practice as a model for effective clinical decision-making. Level: Graduate
  • P T 659 - Capstone Project

    Credits: 4. Prereq. Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum. Development of the skills needed by physical therapists to fulfill their role as effective participants in the research process. Guide student through the capstone case report completion process. Only CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 660 - Mgmt of MS Disorders

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring, summer.  Prereq., enrolled in t-DPT curriculum.  PT's role, responsibilities, and decision-making processes regarding patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Level: Graduate
  • P T 661 - Mgmt of CVP Disorders

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring and summer.  prereq., Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum.  PT's role, responsibilities and decision-making processes regarding appropriate patient management of persons with cardiovascular and/or pulmonary disorders. Level: Graduate
  • P T 662 - Mgmt of Neuro Disorders

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring, summer.  Prereq., enrolled in t-DPT curriculum.  PT's role, responsibilities, and decision-making processes regarding patients with neurological disorders. Level: Graduate
  • P T 663 - Mgmt of Integ Disorders

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring, summer.  Prereq., Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum.  PT's role, responsibilities, and decision-making processes regarding patients with integumentary disorders. Level: Graduate
  • P T 664 - Wellenss and Health Promotion

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn, spring, summer.  Prereq., Enrolled in t-DPT curriculum.  PT's role, responsibilities, and decision-making processes regarding patient/client involvement with wellness and health promotion. Level: Graduate
  • P T 672 - Research in PT II

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Data analysis, writing of research manuscript, presentation of project. Level: Graduate
  • P T 676 - Clinical Reasoning III

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Course addresses elements of clinical mastery, professional development, career options, ethics and patient advocacy. Each student develops and presents a case report and provides peer review and feedback. Level: Graduate
  • P T 679 - Trends & Scholarly Act.

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor. Students are required to complete at least 6 credits during their 2nd and 3rd years. Seminar sections that focus on advanced clinical topics in physical therapy and/or engagement in research with an individual faculty advisor. Traditional or CR/NCR grading as determined by instructor. Level: Graduate
  • P T 680 - Clinical Internship

    Credits: 12. Offered spring. Enrolled in entry-level DPT program and passed all previous DPT courses or permission of instructor.Prereq., Successful completion of all prior DPT coursework and clinical experiences. Final summative experience is a 15 week clinical internship. Includes writing and presentation of case study or special project. CR/NCR grading. Level: Graduate
  • P T 690 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Prereq., consent of instr. Traditional or CR/NCR grading as determined by instructor. Level: Graduate
  • P T 691 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Traditional or CR/NCR grading as determined by instructor. Level: Graduate
  • P T 692 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instructor. Traditional or CR/NCR grading as determined by instructor. Level: Graduate
  • P T 694 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Traditional or CR/NCR grading as determined by course instructor. Level: Graduate
  • P T 699 - Thesis/Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10)  Offered every term. Only CR/NCR grading. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Allied Health: Health Sciences

  • AHHS 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R 6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • AHHS 201 - Living Well, Health & Disablil

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. The development and implementation of exercise programs for individuals with physical disabilities or chronic illness.
  • AHHS 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • AHHS 325 - Introduction to Gerontology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing or consent of instr. An interdisciplinary discussion of the health and social issues of older persons, utilizing didactic presentations, clinical demonstrations, and curricular modules.
  • AHHS 327 - MGS Meeting

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Offered spring. Attendance and participation in the Montana Gerontology Society meeting held annually in April.
  • AHHS 389 - Rec Adv in Clin Med

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Offered spring. Prereq., junior or senior standing. Weekly presentations throughout the semester by local clinical medical practitioners describing in non-technical terms recent advances in their specialities.
  • AHHS 390 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-8) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Traditional or CR/NCR grading determined by instructor.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • AHHS 391 - Special topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • AHHS 394 - Medical Preparation

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Admission by application, sophomores, juniors, and seniors only. This is a survey course designed for students considering a career in the health care field, geared towards students considering becoming a medical provider (MD, DO, NP, PA).
  • AHHS 395 - Geriatric Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered spring. Prereq., HS 325. Service learning experience in geriatrics in a setting compatible with the student’s major and interests.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • AHHS 420 - Geriatric Health Issues

    Credits: 3. Prereq., Anatomy & physiology. A review of normal aspects of aging, common health problems associated with aging, and common pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of these problems in older persons.
  • AHHS 430 - Health Aspects of Aging

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Overview of the health aspects of aging in the United States including biological theories of aging, normal physiological changes associated with aging systems, common pathological problems associated with aging, cultural and ethnic differences in the health of elders, health promotion and healthy aging, and the health care continuum of care for older persons.
  • AHHS 440 - Psychoso Illness Disabil

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as SW 440. Prereq., PSYX 245. A review of the psychosocial aspects of illness and disability in older persons to include societal impact of these illnesses, responses of the individual, family, and support network to the stress of illness and disability, caregiver issues, cultural implications, and the impact of the health care system on these psychosocial aspects.
  • AHHS 490 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-8) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Traditional or CR/NCR grading determined by instructor.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • AHHS 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • AHHS 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Gradaute

Pharmacy

  • PHAR 300 - Pharmacy Practice I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., M 162 and admission to the professional pharmacy program. An introduction to the prescription and pharmaceutical calculations and to the role of the pharmacist in systems involved in health care delivery.
  • PHAR 310 - Pharmacy Practice II

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 300 (309). Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to pharmacy practice. Introductory dispensing laboratory.
  • PHAR 320 - Am Ind Health Issues

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. An overview of the health issues, health care delivery, health disparities, and social determinants of health that impact American Indians. Also, provides an overview in careers in health and cultural awareness for students.
  • PHAR 363 - Pharmaceutical Care Lab I

    Credits: 1. Coreq. PHAR 310.  Practice in technical and legal aspects of drug dispensing, prescription and OTC drug counseling, and sterile intravenous (IV) admixture.
  • PHAR 395 - Pharmacy Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-3) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., PHAR 309. Supervised professional experience in the Student Health Service Pharmacy.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • PHAR 412 - Pharmacy Practice III

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., second professional year standing and a course in communication. The social, economic, legal, ethical, and psychological factors involved in professional and patient relationships of pharmacists.
  • PHAR 415 - Medication Therapy Mgmt

    Credits: 1. Offered Spring. Prereq., second or third professional year standing in pharmacy. A broad introduction to the basic principles, concepts, and application of medication therapy management (MTM) in various pharmacy practice settings.
  • PHAR 451 - Therapeutics I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., second professional year standing; coreq., PHAR 471; prereq. PHAR 328, PHAR 381, PHAR 331, PHAR 342. Pharmacotherapeutics of common disease states emphasizing pathophysiology and the selection, monitoring, and individualization of drug therapy. Applies the basic pharmaceutical sciences to patient care.
  • PHAR 452 - Therapeutics II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 451; coreq., PHAR 472; prereq. or coreq., PHAR (BMED) 422, 432 and 444. Pharmacotherapeutics of common disease states emphasizing pathophysiology and the selection, monitoring, and individualization of drug therapy. Applies the basic pharmaceutical sciences to patient care.
  • PHAR 460 - Pharmaceutical Care Lab II

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., second professional year standing, PHAR 310. Introduction to parenteral practice application, applied patient interview assessment, and communication skills for practice.
  • PHAR 463 - Pharmaceutical Care Lab III

    Credits: 1. Coreq. PHAR 412.  Practice counseling and patient-care skills with emphasis on non-prescription drugs and devices.  Includes individual in-service presentations.
  • PHAR 471 - Integrated Studies III

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., second professional year standing in pharmacy. Small group conferences designed to develop professional skills while integrating material from first and second year professional pharmacy courses.
  • PHAR 472 - Integrated Studies IV

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 471. Continuation of 471.
  • PHAR 480 - Community Pharmacy IPPE

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of first professional year. Supervised professional experience in community pharmacy.
  • PHAR 481 - Hospital Pharmacy IPPE

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of first professional year. Supervised professional experience in a hospital pharmacy.
  • PHAR 505 - Pharmacy Practice IV

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., third professional year standing in Pharm.D. program. Applications of advanced drug therapy monitoring and disease state management. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 506 - Pharmacy Practice V

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 505. Aspects of dispensing, management, communications, disease state monitoring, and legal issues related to the provision of pharmaceutical care. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 513 - Pharmacoeconomics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., third professional year standing or consent of instr. Introduction to assessing the economic, clinical and humanistic outcomes of pharmacotherapy. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 514E - Case Studies Pharm Ethics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., third professional year standing or consent of instr. A practical discussion of pharmacy ethics, as it relates to pharmacy practice. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • PHAR 550 - Drug Literature Eval

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., third professional year standing in pharmacy. Scientific and statistical evaluation of the drug and medical research literature to formulate solutions for patient-specific pharmacotherapy problems. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • PHAR 553 - Therapeutics III

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., PHAR 452, 472: prereq. or coreq., PHAR 571. Pharmacotherapeutics of common disease states emphasizing pathophysiology and the selection, monitoring, and individualization of drug therapy. Applies the basic pharmaceutical sciences to patient care. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 554 - Therapeutics IV

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 553, 571; prereq. or coreq., PHAR 572. Intended for Pharm.D. students. Pharmacotherapeutics of common disease states emphasizing pathophysiology and the selection, monitoring, and individualization of drug therapy. Applies the basic pharmaceutical sciences to patient care. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 556 - Psychopharmacotherapeutics

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., PHAR 452 or consent of instr. A discussion of the more common childhood and adult psychiatric disorders with emphasis on a pharmacologic approach to their treatment. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 557 - Public Health In Pharmacy

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., PHAR 452, 472. Discussion of the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists in public health and the role of drugs in public health programs. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 560 - Pharmaceutical Care Lab IV

    Credits: 1. Coreq PHAR 505.  Practice in professional communication and pharmaceutical care interventions and recommendations. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 563 - Pharmaceutical Care Lab V

    Credits: 1. Coreq., PHAR 554. Practice in professional communication and pharmaceutical care interventions and recommendations. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 571 - Integrated Studies V

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., third professional year standing in Pharm.D. program. Small group conferences designed to develop the professional skills needed to practice pharmaceutical care while integrating material from the professional pharmacy curriculum. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 572 - Integrated Studies VI

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., third professional year standing in Pharm.D. program. Small group conferences designed to develop professional skills while integrating material from other pharmacy courses. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 578 - Port Assess/APPE Orient

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., final semester in didactic PHARM D curriculum. Preparation and assessment of the student portfolio and orientation for the final experiential year of the professional pharmacy program. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 579 - Comm Pharm APPE

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm. D. program. Supervised professional experience in the patient care functions of the pharmacist in the community pharmacy setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 580 - Hosp Pharm APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq. Completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the patient care functions of the pharmacist in the hospital pharmacy setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 581 - Inpatient APPE

    Credits: 4 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the clinical functions of the pharmacist in the inpatient hospital setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 582 - AMB Care APPE

    Credits: 4 TO 16. (R-16) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the clinical functions of the pharmacist in the ambulatory care setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 583 - Drug Information APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the provision of drug information by the pharmacist. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 584 - Specialized Services APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in specialized practice settings, such as home infusion, compounding, and nuclear pharmacies.. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 585 - Geriatric APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience with geriatric patients in the long term care and/or other pharmacy setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 586 - Clinical Speciality APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-16) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the clinical functions of the pharmacist in specialty settings or with specialized groups of patients. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 587 - Administrative APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in the administrative aspects of providing pharmaceutical care. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 588 - Research APPE

    Credits: 4. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in a research setting. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 589 - Education APPE

    Credits: 4. Offered every term. Prereq., completion of didactic courses in the Pharm.D. program. Supervised professional experience in teaching in a pharmacy curriculum. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Independent Study
  • PHAR 603 - Professional Practice IV

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., third professional year standing in Pharm.D. program and acceptance into M.B.A. program. Aspects of dispensing, management, communications, disease state monitoring, and legal issues related to the provision of pharmaceutical care. Level: Graduate
  • PHAR 604 - Professional Practice V

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., PHAR 603. Applications of advanced drug therapy monitoring and disease state. Level: Graduate

Social Work

  • S W 100 - Intro Soc Welfare

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Overview of human services, programs and problems in meeting social welfare needs, with emphasis on the complexity of social services and their historical development. Analysis of the value, attitudinal, economic and political factors that condition the provision of these services.
  • S W 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instructor. Application of classroom learning in off campus internship placements. Prior approval must be obtained from the School of Social Work practicum coordinator and from the Center for Work-Based Learning. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 398,) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • S W 200 - Intro Soc Wrk Pract

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 100, sophomore standing. Introduction to social work as a profession, including an examination of goals, guiding philosophy and basic assumptions. Emphasis on a generalist framework of social work practice and the development of beginning analytical and practice skills.
  • S W 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • S W 300 - Hum Behav & Soc Environ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 100 and 200, and junior standing in Social Work. Using the ecological-social systems framework, the integration of knowledge and concepts from the social and behavioral sciences for analysis and assessment of problems and issues relevant to professional social work practice.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • S W 310 - S W Policy & Services

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 200; Social Work major. Social welfare history, program planning and analysis with review of selected policies on the national level. Includes international comparisons. Upper-division writing course.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • S W 323 - Women & Soc Action Amer

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., one of SW 100, SOCI 101S, or ANTY 101H or consent of instr. Same as WS 323. Focus on women’s experiences of and contributions to social change in North, South and Central America in the mid to late-20th century. Through case studies, testimonials, discussions with activists and Internet connections examine social constructions of gender, compare forms of social action in diverse cultural, political and historical contexts, link practice to theories of social participation, and reflect on lessons learned from women’s experiences.
  • S W 325 - Introduction to Gerontology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., junior standing or consent of instr. An interdisciplinary discussion of the health and social issues of older persons, utilizing didactic presentations, clinical demonstrations, and curricular modules.
  • S W 350 - S W Interven Meth I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 200; Social Work major. The study and application of the generalist model of social work practice and related techniques and procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of problems in social functioning. Emphasis on individuals and families.
  • S W 360 - S W Interven Meth II

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Social Work major. The study and application of the generalist model of social work practice and related techniques and procedures for the assessment, intervention and prevention of problems in social functioning. Emphasis on groups and team meetings.
  • S W 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • S W 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered autumn and spring. Application of classroom learning in off campus internship placements. Prior approval must be obtained from the School of Social Work practicum coordinator and the Center for Work-Based Learning. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 398) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • S W 400 - Social Work Research

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 360; Social Work major. Utilization of social research findings in social work practice. Techniques for the collection and analysis of clinical data. Special emphasis on research methodology for the assessment of practitioner and program effectiveness.
  • S W 410E - Social Work Ethics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., SW 200, admission into the BSW program. Analysis of specific ethical dilemmas from personal, professional and policy perspectives. Focus on ethical issues common to the helping professions and utilizing codes of ethics as guides to decision-making. The relationship between professional ethical issues and the development of social policy.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • S W 420 - Child Abuse/Child Welfare

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior standing or consent of instr. Signs and symptoms of physical and sexual abuse and neglect, family dynamics in abuse and neglect, the legal context, programs of prevention and intervention, foster care, special needs adoptions and related issues in child welfare.
  • S W 423 - Addiction Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Same as PSYX 441 and SOCI 433. Examination of chemical dependency and behavioral compulsions, including alcohol and other drugs, gambling, eating disorders, sexual addictions. Ecosystems perspective on etiology, treatment, prevention, family dynamics, community response, and societal contributors. Students engage in a service learning community project which is integrated into the classroom through initial training, regular reflection, and other activities.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • S W 450 - Children and Youth at Risk

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Focus on the aspects of society that pose a threat to today’s youth and the ramification of those threats on youth development and behavior. Resilience and protective factors for youth at risk and strategies to work with those youth. Attention to related systems in Missoula and Montana, including juvenile justice, mental health, child protection, substance abuse, and education.
  • S W 455 - Social Gerontology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Examination of the field of social gerontology, including an examination of the major bio/psycho/social/cultural/spiritual theories of aging, the service system, social and health issues, family and care-giving dynamics, social policy, and end of life concerns.
  • S W 465 - Social Work Global Context

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., upper-division or graduate standing. Examination of globalization, human rights, poverty, international aid, and gender issues; their relationship to social work and social justice, and strategies for action.
  • S W 472 - Relational Development

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. This course covers strategies to help children whose early experiences deprived them of the nurturing needed to develop the essential capacity to connect with others. Emphasis is on significant discoveries in the fields of neuroscience, childhood trauma, grief and loss, child development, and family systems that have fueled the evolution of the Attachment Treatment philosophy to a broader method of caring for emotionally distress children, the Relational Development treatment approach.
  • S W 475 - Death, Dying and Grief

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Examination of death, dying and grief from an ecological perspective, focusing on the processes of dying and theories of grief. Emphasis on physical, social, psychological, spiritual, and cultural influences that surround death and grief. Consideration of cultural norms, attitudes toward death, medical, legal and ethical issues of dying. Focus on normal and complicated grief.
  • S W 485 - Counseling Theories

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., PSYX 100S. Same as COUN 485 and PSYX 442. This course introduces students to the primary theories that constitute the intellectual foundation for common counseling and psychotherapy techniques, with a special focus on gender, interpersonal influence strategies, and diversity issues.
  • S W 487 - Advanced Practice I

    Credits: 2. Offered every term. Concurrent SW 495; admission to the practicum program. Consideration and discussion of practicum-related matters, professional development, and issues confronting the profession.
  • S W 488 - Advanced Practice II

    Credits: 2. Concurrent with SW 495; admission to the practicum program. Consideration and discussion of practicum-related matters, professional development, and issues confronting the profession.
  • S W 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • S W 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R 10) Offered intermittently. Prereq., 10 credits in social work. Independent work under the University omnibus option. See index.
    Course Attributes:
    • Omnibus Course
  • S W 495 - Field Work Practicum

    Credits: 5. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., SW 350 and 360 and approved application to practicum coordinator. Practicum must be taken over two consecutive semesters for a total of 10 credits. Minimum of one credit per semester. Cumulative grade average of 2.75 or above in SW 100, 200, 300, 350 and 360 and a 3.0 grade average for SW 200, 350 and 360 are required. Supervised field work in public and private agencies and institutions. Successful completion of the field work practicum requires a passing performance on the school administered professional social work competency examination.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • S W 500 - Orientation

    Credits: 1. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program. Seminar introducing M.S.W. students to program philosophy and social work’s theory and value base. Level: Graduate
  • S W 505 - Found Social Work Pract

    Credits: 2. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program. Introductory practice course that examines generalist social work practice, dominant theoretical influences, and forces shaping social work over time. Level: Graduate
  • S W 510 - Hum Behav Soc Envt I

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program. Introduction to and critical consideration of social work perspectives on human behavior as influenced by the social environment. Particular attention is paid to biological, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual influences. Level: Graduate
  • S W 511 - Hum Behav Soc Invt II

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program and SW 510 or consent of instr. Advanced course on human behavior and social environment that addresses difference and diversity, histories and mechanisms of discrimination and oppression, and frameworks for thought and practice that recognize diversity and promote social justice. Level: Graduate
  • S W 515 - Pract W Indiv & Families

    Credits: 4. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program or consent of instr. Practice-oriented course building on students’ developing knowledge of engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation and the application to practice with individuals and families in context of community. Level: Graduate
  • S W 520 - SW Research Methods

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program or consent of instr. Introduction to principles, methodologies, technologies, and statistical approaches of human service research. Emphasis on beginning capabilities in evaluation of social work practice and skill development regarding use of published research. Level: Graduate
  • S W 521 - Advanced Research

    Credits: 3. Prereq., SW 515. The use of research within the integrated practice model of social work through evaluation of practice and program evaluation. Advanced statistical concepts are applied to direct practice and five types of program evaluation. Level: Graduate
  • S W 525 - Pract Groups & Communities

    Credits: 4. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program or consent of instr. Practice oriented course addressing theories, frameworks, principles, and skills of group and community work. Dynamics of group work and examination of modalities such as mutual aid and social action groups. Level: Graduate
  • S W 530 - History of Social Policy

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to M.S.W. program or consent of instr. Foundation in social welfare policy and services; examination of relationship between history social welfare policy and emergence of social work profession. Introduction to frameworks for policy analysis. Level: Graduate
  • S W 531 - Social Policy Analysis

    Credits: 3. Prereq., SW 530. Focus on the analysis of existing or proposed policies specific to oppressed populations, rural areas and isolated communities. Level: Graduate
  • S W 535 - Advanced Practice

    Credits: 4. Prereq., consent of instr. Builds on the skills, knowledge, and values of the foundation generalist and practice courses. Level: Graduate
  • S W 545 - Organizational Leadership

    Credits: 3. Prereq., consent of instr. Advanced training in professional leadership and how to effectively conceive, plan, design, implement, manage, assess, and change contemporary organizations. Level: Graduate
  • S W 551 - Couples and Family Therapy

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., admission to the MSW program, SW 505, or consent of instructor. Course explores family-centered methods of clinical social work interventions with couples and families that can be applied in a variety of settings. Level: Graduate
  • S W 552 - Psychopathology & S W

    Credits: 3. Prereq., admission to the MSW program, SW 505, or permission of instructor. Focus on current problems of children, adolescents, and adults of all ages that can be classified as a mental disorder under the DSM of the system. Includes information on theories within the bio-psycho-social paradigm of causality of disorders/conditions; on methods of assessment, including DSM; and an understanding of how social injustice, oppression and poverty impacts healthy growth and development across the life span. Level: Graduate
  • S W 553 - Social Work Addictions

    Credits: 3. Offered spring semester.  Prereq., admission to MSW program or by permission of instructor. The course examines historical and contemporary models of direct practice, and current ideological, political, policy and systemic challenges to the practice of social work in the addictions. Level: Graduate
  • S W 576 - Found Integrative Sem I

    Credits: 1. Prereq., admission to MSW program, SW 505, 587. Seminar accompanying first semester foundation practicum in which students discuss experience with goal of integrating theory and practice. Level: Graduate
  • S W 577 - Found Integrative Sem II

    Credits: 1. Prereq., admission to MSW program, SW 505, 587. Seminar accompanying second semester foundation practicum in which students discuss experience with goal of integrating theory and practice. Level: Graduate
  • S W 578 - Advanced Seminar I

    Credits: 1. Prereq., SW 587. Critical analysis of how predominant social work theories and professional values and skills are being incorporated into the practicum. Level: Graduate
  • S W 579 - Advanced Seminar II

    Credits: 1. Prereq., SW 578. Critical analysis of how predominant social work theories and professional values and skills are being incorporated into the practicum. Advanced portfolio development. Level: Graduate
  • S W 586 - Found Practicum I

    Credits: 2. Prereq., admission to MSW program. First semester foundation field practicum experience in a supervised setting designed to provide opportunities to integrate classroom learning and field experiences. Level: Graduate
  • S W 587 - Found Practicum II

    Credits: 2. Prereq., admission to MSW program, SW 505, 587. Second semester foundation field practicum experience in a supervised setting designed to provide opportunities to integrate classroom learning and field experiences. Level: Graduate
  • S W 588 - Concentration Practicum I

    Credits: 3. Prereq., SW 587, 589. Advanced supervised field work in public and private agencies and institutions. Level: Graduate
  • S W 589 - Concentration Practicum II

    Credits: 3. Prereq., SW 588. Advanced supervised field work in public and private agencies and institutions. Level: Graduate
  • S W 593 - Professional Portfolio

    Credits: 1. Prereq., foundation courses. Summative and in-depth written analysis of course work and practicum experience. Level: Graduate
  • S W 594 - Graduate Seminar

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., admission to MSW program or consent of instr. In-depth analysis of a current social work issue. Level: Graduate
  • S W 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., admission to MSW program or consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • S W 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., admission to MSW program or consent of instr. Work on selected problems by individual students under direct faculty supervision. Level: Graduate
  • S W 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., admission to MSW program or consent of instr. Directed individual graduate research and study appropriate to background and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate

Humanities and Sciences

African-American Studies

  • AAS 342H - Afr Amer Hist to 1865

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as HSTA 342H. Survey of the African-American experience from the African background to the end of the Civil War. Focus on Black American quest for the American Dream, and how Blacks attempted to deal with the challenges of enslavement and racism.
    Course Attributes:
    • Historical & Cultural Course
  • AAS 343H - Afr Amer Hist Since 1865

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as HSTA 343H (HIST 379H). Study of the African-American experience since the Civil War. Change and continuity in the African-American experience, the fight against Jim Crow, the struggle for civil rights, and post-civil rights economic, political, social and cultural developments and challenges.
    Course Attributes:
    • Historical & Cultural Course
  • AAS 347 - Voodoo, Muslim, Church

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as HSTA 347. The African-American religious experience encompasses Islam, Christianity, Santería, voodoo, and many others. In this course, students will examine the history of religious expression within the African-American community from the colonial era through the twentieth century. Central to the course is the question, “How did religion shape the experience of the African-American community?” Students will also examine the ways in which religious practice influenced social, political, and cultural changes in American history.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Approved
  • AAS 415 - The Black Radical Tradition

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as HSTA 415. Prereq., HSTR 200 and only open to majors and minors in history or consent of instructor. From slave revolts through to the Move rebellion in Philadelphia, this course examines how the African-American community has engaged in radical efforts to change the status quo in the name of seeking justice.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • AAS 417 - Prayer & Civil Rights

    Credits: 3. (AM) Same as HSTA 417. HSTR 200 and only open to majors and minors in history or consent of instructor. This course explores the meaning of public prayer in the Civil Rights Movement. Built around the question, "Does religion help or hinder the pursuit of social change?" this class combines historical and religious studies inquiry to trace changes in civil rights activists' efforts to make use of religion. By focusing on a particular religious practice - in this case prayer - in a specific, but limited period of time, this course challenges students to consider how meaning is formed through historical action and study the social significance of religious practice. This formed through historical action and study the social significance of religious practice. This course complicates prevailing ideas about the normalcy of African-American religious practitioners' prayer, invites students to examine their assumptions about the nature of prayer, and traces how religion spilled out of sanctuaries into the streets during the civil rights era.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced

African-American Studies

  • AAST 141H - Black: From Africa to Hip-Hop

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as HIST 141H. This course introduces students to the primary questions, themes, and approaches to African-American Studies. In addition to examining key historical periods such as Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights era, students will encounter Hip-Hop, African-American film, African-American religion, and contemporary identity politics. This course concludes by discussing the reasons for and new directions in African-American studies, including diaspora studies, Pan-Africanism, and post-colonial studies. Overall students will gain new insight into the social, cultural, political, and intellectual, experiences of a diverse people and into the history and contemporary experience of the United States.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • AAST 208H - Discovering Africa

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as HIST 208H. Interdisciplinary study of the history of pre-colonial Africa, focusing on social, economic, political and cultural institutions and traditions including the wealth, diversity and complexity of ancient and classical African civilizations and cultures.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
  • AAST 260 - African Americans and Native Americans

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. A study of the broad scope of relations between African Americans and Native Americans in colonial and United States history. Topics explored through history, sociology, and cultural anthropology.
  • AAST 262 - Abolitionism: The First Civil Rights Movement

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Same as HIST 262. Interdisciplinary, historical perspective on the early 19th century movement to abolish slavery and racial discrimination in the United States.
  • AAST 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • AAST 372 - African-American Identity

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Interdisciplinary course designed to explore and illuminate the multifaceted nature and development of African-American group and individual identity.
  • AAST 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • AAST 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • AAST 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • AAST 499 - Capstone/Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr.

Anthropology

  • ANTY 101H - Anthro & the Human Experience

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Offered intermittently in summer. A survey of anthropology which introduces the fundamental concepts, methods and perspectives of the field. The description and analysis of human culture, its growth and change. The nature and functions of social institutions.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 102H - Intro to South & S. East Asia

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An introduction to South and Southeast Asian regions, cultures, societies, and histories, with particular emphasis on artistic, religious and literary traditions from prehistory to the present. Countries include India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Nepal. An overview approach with different materials and emphases.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 103H - Intro Latin American Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Multidisciplinary survey and introduction to Latin America from pre- Columbian times to the present.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 104 - Ancient Migrations

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An exploration of migrations in human prehistory and history as known from DNA studies, the archaeological record, historical linguistics, the human fossil record and history. How these migrations have impacted the culture, institutions, and biology of contemporary societies and populations.
  • ANTY 122S - Race and Minorities

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Analysis of the development and concept of race as a social category and the processes of cultural change within and between ethnic groups.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
    • Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
  • ANTY 133X - Food and Culture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Examination of the ways culture shapes the satisfaction of a biological need; food production, preparation, choices, customs, taste, taboos, beverages, spices and food distribution around the globe.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 141H - The Silk Road

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Introduction to the study of the human communities, cultures, and economies in Central and Southwest Asia along the ancient four thousand mile-long Silk Road.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ANTY 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, and 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ANTY 210N - Intro to Physical Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. An introduction to human evolutionary biology including processes of evolution, primate studies, hominid paleontology, and human variation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • ANTY 211N - Anthropological Genetics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Genetics-related problems that confront individuals and society. Variation and natural selection in human populations. Designed for non-biology majors.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • ANTY 213N - Physical Anthropology Lab

    Credits: 1. Prereq., or coreq., ANTY 210N.  Offered autumn and spring. This lab course allows students to more deeply explore the concepts and materials covered in Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Students will engage in lab based activities involving human genetics and processes of evolution, biology and behavior of non-human primates, human evolution, and modern human adaptation and variation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • ANTY 216 - Primates in Peril

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An overview of the living primates and their behavior with a focus on conservation issues that have an impact on primates.
  • ANTY 220S - Culture & Society

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Study of social organization of non-western societies; emphasis on variations in ecology, social structure, economic, political and religious beliefs and practices.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 241H - Central Asian Culture and Civ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even numbered years. Introduction to Central Asia's history, culture and ways of thinking. Focus on the political and social organization of Central Asia and cultural changes as expressed in art and interactions with China, India and the Middle East.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 250S - Intro to Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. What archaeologists do and how they reconstruct past human cultures. Methodological and theoretical approaches to understanding and explaining past human societies.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • ANTY 251H - Foundations of Civilization

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Focus on the worldwide evolution of human society from Stone Age hunter-gatherers to the beginnings of modern civilization. Approached through the colorful and exciting world of archaeologists and the sites they excavate.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 254H - Arch Wonders of the World

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even numbered years. This course highlights the classical civilizations of the ancient world, fields such as Egyptology and Classical Archaeology, and the major archaeological discoveries which are associated with them.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings relating to current problems or new developments in the discipline.
  • ANTY 310 - Human Variation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 210N or consent of instr. Introduction to human biological variation, and to the methods and theories that are used to explain the distribution of variable features.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • ANTY 312 - Human Evolution

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 210N. An exploration of the fossil and archaeological records of the evolution of human beings, and of current methods and theories used in interpreting these data.
  • ANTY 314 - Principles of Forensic Anthro

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 210N.  A study of techniques for recovering skeletal material, identifying and interpreting human skeletal remains, keeping records, interacting with the law enforcement system and documenting human rights abuses.
  • ANTY 318 - Casting & Facial Approximation

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 314 and consent of instr. An exploration of techniques for conservation and replication of skeletal elements, facial reconstruction, and other techniques for identification of individuals from their skeletal remains.
  • ANTY 323 - Native People of Montana

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The history and culture of the Indian tribes in Montana.
  • ANTY 323X - Native Peoples of Montana

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The history and culture of the Indian tribes in Montana.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 326E - Indigenous Peoples & Globl Dev

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. This class will examine the impact of global development on tribal and Indigenous peoples. Topics will include land issues, health, employment, and cultural change caused by global development and explore how these societies are resisting and adapting to their changing world.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 330X - Peoples and Cultures of World

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Study of the peoples of various geographic regions and their cultures.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 333 - Culture and Population

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn, even-numbered years. The relationship between population processes and culture to the human condition; survey data, methodologies, theories of demographic and culture change.
  • ANTY 336 - Myth, Ritual and Religion

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Theories and practices concerning supernatural phenomena, and the comparative study of world religions and cosmological traditions of indigenous peoples throughout the world.
  • ANTY 347 - Central Asia and Its Neighbors

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Analysis of the human communities and cultures of Central and Southwest Asia, with particular emphasis on the importance of relationships with neighboring countries and civilizations since ancient times.
  • ANTY 349 - Social Change in NnWstrn Socts

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn, odd-numbered years. Study of the processes of change, modernization and development.
  • ANTY 351H - Archaeology of North America

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. The origins, backgrounds and development of Pre-Columbian American peoples and cultures.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 352X - Archaeology of Montana

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The origins, distributions and development of aboriginal cultures in Montana and surrounding regions.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ANTY 353 - PaleoIndian Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring or winter, even-numbered years. Examines archaeological, linguistic, biological and skeletal data to determine from where and when Native Americans arrived in North America.  Examines archaeological sites from such diverse places as Montana, Siberia, Virginia, and Chile to answer the most intriguing question in contemporary American archaeology today:  how, when and from where did people first arrive in the Americas?
  • ANTY 354H - Mesoamerican Prehistory

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. The development of civilization and prehistoric states in the New World. Prehistoric lifeways and the effects of European contact on these cultures.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
  • ANTY 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ANTY 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., 9 credits in anthropology; consent of faculty supervisor and cooperative education officer. Practical application of classroom learning through internship in a number of areas such as museology, cultural resource management, and forensics. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, and 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ANTY 400 - History of Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 101H and 220S. The development of theory and method in cultural anthropology to the present. Various archaeological, ethnological and socio-psychological theories in the light of historical anthropology.
  • ANTY 401 - Anthropological Data Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., M 104, M 105, M 115, M 121, M 122, M 135, M 151 or consent of instr. An analysis of the foundations of anthropological scaling and measurement.
  • ANTY 402 - Quan Ethnographic Field Methds

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. This course is designed to enhance student understanding of field methods that generate quantitative data describing human behavior. The toolkit of a student completing this course will include knowledge of basic methods that will get you from observing behavior to discussing your research and findings in a professional manner in oral or written formats.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ANTY 403E - Ethics and Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 101H or 220S, or consent of instr. Ethical and anthropological modes of inquiry in relation to each other. Focus on the sociocultural subfield as well as ethical issues in physical anthropology and archaeology.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
  • ANTY 404 - Anthropological Museology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., ANTY 101H. Introduction to anthropological museums, museum work and museum theory.
  • ANTY 408 - Advanced Anthro Statistics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 401 or consent of inst. Focus on techniques used for microcomputer-based data management and multivariate analysis.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ANTY 409 - Preceptorship in Anthropology

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., ANTY 210N, 220S, 250S and consent of instr. Assisting a faculty member by tutoring, grading objective exams, conducting review sessions, and carrying out other class-related responsibilities. Open to juniors, senior, and graduate students with consent of the faculty member with whom they serve. Proposals must be approved by department chair.
  • ANTY 412 - Osteology

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 314 and consent of instr. A detailed examination of the human skeleton with an emphasis on identifying individual bones and their structures. Specifically extended to fragmentary skeletal elements. Direct hands-on experience required.
  • ANTY 413 - Forensic and Mortuary Arch

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 314 and consent of instr. Practical approaches to locating, documenting and recovering human skeletal remains, including surface scatters and burials. Emphasis on interpretations of evidence for recovery scene formation and mortuary behavior.
  • ANTY 415 - Emergence Modern Humans

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 210N. An exploration of the emergence of "modern" humans and their relationships with Neanderthals. Exploration of what it means to be "a modern human" through an examination of human evolutionary history.
  • ANTY 416 - Dental Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 210N. The use of information from teeth in investigating evolutionary trends, the relationships between human groups, subsistence change, and culture change.
  • ANTY 418 - Evol and Genet Var Human Pops

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq. ANTY 310. Human genetic variation examined from a molecular perspective. Emphasis on the role of infectious disease and other factors as a selective factor in human evolution and exploration of the implications of these associations for human genetic variation.
  • ANTY 422 - Mind, Culture and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Prereq., ANTY 220S or consent of instr. The study of socialization, personality, cognition, and mental health cross-culturally.
  • ANTY 423 - Culture and Identity

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. The comparative study of identity formation along and across racial, ethnic, and ethno-national lines. Emphasis on issues of ethnogenesis, cultural resistance, transformation, domination, colonialism as well as sharing to understand both the cultural commonalties and differences in identity formation.
  • ANTY 426 - Culture, Health and Healing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Cross-cultural comparisons of theories and concepts and health and illness. Examination of the impact of these concepts upon health practices and treatment of disease around the world.
  • ANTY 427 - Anthropology of Gender

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Comparative study of the history and significance of gender in social life.
  • ANTY 430 - Social Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Seminar style senior capstone course for cultural anthropology students. This course focuses on bringing theory and methods together in written and visual ethnography.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ANTY 431 - Ethnographic Field Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. Prereq., ANTY 220S or consent of instr. Introduction to socio-cultural anthropological methods including participant observation, interviewing and narrative techniques and analysis of qualitative data.
  • ANTY 432 - Med Anth Global Health

    Credits: 2. Offered intermittently. The course is designed to enhance student understanding of ‘global health’ from the perspective of medical anthropologists and clinicians involved in health care delivery in many settings in the developing world. Students will read broadly in medical anthropology, and will hear the real-life perspectives of health development program designers, project managers, and clinicians.
  • ANTY 433 - Indig Global Health & Healing

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Examination of traditional and contemporary uses of medicine in Native American societies. Issues covered will include current health conditions of American Indians, and the relationship from a cultural perspective on health, healing and medicine.
  • ANTY 435 - Drugs, Culture and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Drug use in a cross-cultural perspective.  The role of drugs in cultural expression and social interaction.  Examination of the prehistory of drug use, drug use in traditional non-Western and Western societies, and drug use in the context of global sociocultural change.
  • ANTY 440 - Cont. Issues of SSEA

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 102H. An examination of the major issues that affect the contemporary experience of South and Southeast Asians.
  • ANTY 442 - Cities/Landscapes Central Asia

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd numbered years. Analysis of the main centers of civilization and culture, rich sites and monuments of Central Asia and Southwest Asia since ancient times.
  • ANTY 444 - Artistic Tradtns Central Asia

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Analysis of the study of human artistic creativity and scientific innovations of various cultures in Central and Southwest Asia since ancient times.
  • ANTY 450 - Archaeological Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Prereq., ANTY 250S. Historical trends and current major theories and methods in archaeology.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ANTY 451 - Cultural Resource Management

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Introduction to the laws and practice of cultural resource/heritage property management. Focus on the management of archaeological sites, historic structures, and traditional cultural places due to federal laws. Emphasis is on laying foundation of CRM practices for students interested in pursuing it as a potential career.
  • ANTY 452 - GIS in Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 250s. Anthropological and archaeological data acquisition, management, and analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and techniques.
  • ANTY 454 - Lithic Technology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Prereq., ANTY 250S and consent of instr.  Analysis of stone artifacts and debitage.
  • ANTY 455 - Artifact Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 250S and consent of instr. Laboratory approaches and techniques for analyzing material culture from technological, stylistic, and chronological perspectives.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ANTY 456 - Historical Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 250S or consent of instr. Understanding and interpreting the past through historical archaeological remains, methods, and theories. Focuses on historical archaeological sites and topics from the American West, but also examines the field’s global perspective.
  • ANTY 457 - Arch of the Pacific Northwest

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Introduction to the study of archaeology in the Pacific Northwest region inclusive of the Northwest Coast and Columbia/Fraser-Thompson Plateau. Understanding hunter-gatherer adaptations, evolution of social complexity, and ancient history of contemporary native peoples in the region.
  • ANTY 458 - Arch of Hunter-Gatherers

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Introduction to the archaeological study of hunter-gatherer societies. Primary emphasis on archaeological method and theory.
  • ANTY 459 - Archof the Arctic/Subarctic

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Introduction to the study of Arctic and Subarctic archaeology emphasizing the Pleistocene and Holocene prehistory of North America and eastern Siberia. Understanding of methodological problems associated with archaeology in a northern context, the evolution of Inuit, Eskimo, Aleut and Athapaskan cultures, and hunter-gatherer adaptations to northern interior and coastal environments.
  • ANTY 465 - Arch of the SW United States

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. The development of the prehistoric communities in the southwestern United States from ancient times to the dawn of history in the area.
  • ANTY 466 - Archaeological Survey

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Prereq., ANTY 250S. Offered autumn. A field course in Montana archaeology.
  • ANTY 467 - Archaeological Field School

    Credits: 3 TO 12. (R-12) Offered summer.  Prereq., ANTY 250S and consent of instructor. Provides students with a well-rounded experience in archaeological field methods.  Field schools will typically occur at archaeological site locations away from campus.  During the archaeological field experience, students may learn methods of excavation, survey, research, and analysis to facilitate their transition to careers as professional archaeologists.
  • ANTY 476 - Methods for Native Languages

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered Spring. In an effort to highlight promising methodologies that will advance the success of Native language acquisition and instruction, students will be exposed to an innovative methodology while being instructed in an Indigenous language.
  • ANTY 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ANTY 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ANTY 494 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Advanced analysis of historical and contemporary issues involving human communities, cultures, and economies of a particular region, and that region’s role in the world.
  • ANTY 495 - Field Experience:

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R- 12) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Organized field experience in anthropology.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ANTY 500 - Cont Anthro Thought

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instructor. A review of major contributions to current anthropological theory, with an emphasis on the application of theory to anthropological problems. Significant advances in general theory, symbolic anthropology, critical theory, cultural studies, and postmodernism. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 501 - Historical Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even numbered years. The location, use, and value of written records in anthropological research. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 510 - Sem Human Var & Evol

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered autumn. Prereq., ANTY 515. Various topics related to genetic evidence of human biological evolution, morphological and genetic diversity of modern humans, and problems of "race". Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 512 - Adv Forensic Anthropology

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 515 and consent of instr. Review of traditional methods and exploration of new methods of skeletal analysis, as applied to cases from the forensic collection. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 513 - Sem Bioarch & Skel Biol

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered spring. Prereq., ANTY 515 or consent of instructor. Theoretical and methodological approaches to the analysis of human skeletal remains derived from archaeological contexts. Demography, health and disease, diet and nutrition, growth, activity patterns, and measures of biological relatedness are interpreted within a biocultural framework. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 514 - Sem Paleoanth & Evol Analy

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., ANTY 515 or consent of instructor. Exploration of selected aspects of the human fossil, archaeological, & genetic records and the theories and methods of evolutionary analysis used to analyze them. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 515 - Theor & Meth in Bioanth

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  A detailed review of the body of theory that is foundational for the study of human evolution, human variation, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology, and primatology, along with a consideration of major methods used to analyze data in these fields. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 520 - Contemporary Ethnography

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. A review and discussion of current ethnographic research. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 521 - Applied Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. Study of ways in which anthropological skills may be used in non-academic fields. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 522 - Medical Anthropology

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An examination of selected issues and trends in contemporary theory and methodology within medical anthropology. Seminar assignments and discussions focus on understanding the application of anthropological concepts and methods in medical settings and are organized around several topics, including cultural conceptualizations of health, illness and risk; global health; the social and cultural construction of illness; drug and pharmaceutical use; and mental health in cultural context. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 550 - Seminar in Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 551 - Sem Historical Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. An exploration of theories, methods, and literature in historical archaeology. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 553 - Evolutionary Archaeology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years. Examination of method and theory in Darwinian evolutionary archaeology. Seminar assignments and discussions focus on human behavioral ecology, cultural transmission, and macroevolution. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 593 - Professional Project

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ANTY 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • ANTY 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing and consent of faculty supervisor. Practical application of classroom learning through internship in a number of areas such as museology, cultural resource management and forensics. Written reports are required. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ANTY 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 600 - Issues Cultural Herit

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., consent of instr. Doctoral dissertation research activties.A review of the range of topics that fall under the umbrella of cultural heritage and a review of theory and practice in one or more of these topics. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 601 - Resrch Design & Proposal Prep

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing. Seminar in the development of anthropological research designs and proposals. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 602 - Cultl Herit Policy & Pract

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. Prereq., graduate standing. Exploration of critical issues in cultural heritage policy emphasizing the regulatory basis for federal CRM, public anthropology, and indigenous people's issues. Hands-on training in the design and production of federal planning documents. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 694 - Seminar Cultural Heritage

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 697 - Advanced Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent research projects, other than dissertation. Level: Graduate
  • ANTY 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Doctoral dissertation research activities. Level: Graduate

Criminal Justice

  • CJUS 125N - Fund of Forensic Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and online spring. A survey of the forensic sciences and related disciplines and their use in criminal investigations, the role of forensic scientists in the investigative process and as expert witnesses.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • CJUS 488 - For Sci Crime Lab & Beyond

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and online in autumn. Examination of the forensic sciences with emphases on the non-crime lab forensic sciences, new technologies, and new directions in the forensic sciences.

English as a Second Language

  • EASL 195 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • EASL 250 - Interm Eng Acad Purpose I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., 525 to 549 on the Paper-Based TOEFL or equivalent. Concentration on academic tasks prompting comprehension of evidence offered to support opinion; gathering facts to be stated in narrative/descriptive patterns is emphasized as distinct from practicing summary exposition. This course is highly recommended to all international students with TOEFL scores between 525 and 549. Student Option Grade Mode (traditional or credit/no credit).
  • EASL 251 - Inter Eng Acad Purposes II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., 525 to 549 on the Paper-Based TOEFL or equivalent. Concentration on academic tasks guiding identification of main ideas underlying formal speech (broadcasts, lectures, interviews); recognition of intent of discussion and status of detail therein bearing on readings is emphasized. This course is highly recommended to all international students with TOEFL scores between 525 and 549. Student Option Grade Mode (traditional or credit/no credit).
  • EASL 450 - Adv Eng Acad Purposes I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., 550 to 574 on the Paper-Based TOEFL or equivalent. Concentration on academic tasks prompting the collection and comprehension of evidence used to draw inferences regarding debatable issues; explanation of connection between evidence and inference is emphasized. This course is highly recommended to all international students with TOEFL scores between 550 and 574. Student Option Grade Mode (traditional or credit/no credit).
  • EASL 451 - Adv Eng Acad Purposes II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., 550 to 574 on the Paper-Based TOEFL or equivalent. Concentration on academic tasks obliging comprehension of main ideas/details furnished in spoken media (broadcasts, lectures, discussions); detection of intended message and essential facts related to readings is emphasized.This course is highly recommended to all international students with TOEFL scores between 550 and 574. Student Option Grade Mode (traditional or credit/no credit).

Historic Preservation

  • HPRV 400 - Historic Preservation

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. This course is intended to provide a comprehensive foundation to historic preservation practice and issues.Topics include the history and theory of the American historic preservation movement, identification and documentation of historic properties, preservation technology, strategies for conservation of historic resources and a critical examination of the philosophy and principles of preservation.

Linguistics

  • LING 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one–time offerings of current topics.
  • LING 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LING 270S - Introduction to Linguistics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  An introduction to the field of modern linguistics and to the nature of language. Emphasis on the ways different cultures develop symbol systems for representing meaning.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • LING 375X - Endangered Languages

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Survey of endangered languages and the communities in which those endangered languages are spoken. Topics to be addressed include linguistic diversity, language endangerment, language shift and loss, language maintenance efforts, and prospects for the future of these languages.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • LING 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R–9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one–time offerings of current topics.
  • LING 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LING 465 - Structure & History of English

    Credits: 3. Offered once per year. The development of the English language from a historical perspective contrasted with the phonological and grammatical structure of English from a modern linguistic point of view; specifically designed for teachers.
  • LING 470 - Linguistic Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. An in-depth examination of the formal properties of language, concentrating on the core areas of linguistic analysis (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics).
  • LING 471 - Phonetics and Phonology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., LING 470.  A study of phonetic and phonological systems from as many as 20 languages, most of them non–Indo–European; training in how to do linguistic analysis as well as linguistic theory. This course co-convenes with LING 571.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 472 - Generative Syntax

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., LING 470. A study of the human language sentence–formation system, the means for expressing semantic information as propositional content. Emphasis on the abstraction of utterances in the form of mathematical objects. This course co-convenes with LING 572.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 473 - Language and Culture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., LING 470.  Technical study of the relationships between grammatical categories and world view. This course co-convenes with LING 573.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LING 474 - Historical Linguistics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., LING 470. An introduction to the study of language change over time. Topics include: methods for studying language change (the comparative method and internal reconstruction); types of language change (sound change, borrowing, analogical change, lexical, syntactic, and semantic change); and explanations for language change. The principles of historical reconstruction and comparative method in the analysis of linguistic variation and change. This course co-convenes with LING 574.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 475 - Linguistic Field Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years.  Prereq., LING 470.  Writing up linguistic data; developing techniques for eliciting linguistic data by working with a native speaker of a less commonly taught language. This course co-convenes with LING 575.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 477 - Bilingualism

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., LING 270S or equiv. Societal and individual bilingualism:  topics include language policy, maintenance, interference, code-switching and mixting, and bilingual education.
  • LING 478 - Learner Language

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., LING 270S or equivalent. Observing/describing language learners' behaviors and, to a degree, advances toward proficiency (i.e., fluency plus accuracy); the presence of error as conditioned by a priori knowledge of language and implications for child and adult development; and applying typical methods of linguistic analysis to the (non-) systematic variants in language form characterizing developmental processes as a way of trying to explain variable behavior.
  • LING 480 - Tchg Engl as For Lang

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn online. Prereq., LING 270 or equiv. Same as ENLI 480. The application of principles of modern linguistics to the problems of teaching English as a foreign language.
  • LING 484 - NA Indigenous Lang & Ling

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Prereq. LING 470. Description and analysis of grammatical features of Indigenous languages of North America. This course co-convenes with LING 584.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LING 489 - Morphology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., LING 470.  A survey of the morphological features of several unrelated languages to provide the student with a broad overview of how languages compare and contrast. This course co-convenes with LING 589.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one–time offerings of current topics.
  • LING 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R–9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Special projects in linguistic analysis.
  • LING 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., LING 270 or LING 470. A review and discussion of advanced topics covering descriptive linguistics, linguistic theory and subjects related to the analysis of human languages.
  • LING 495 - ESL Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., or coreq., LING 480. Offered every term. Students with a teaching major take the course for 3 credits; others take it for 1 credit and do one third of the work.
  • LING 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LING 559 - Preceptorship

    Credits: 1. (R–4) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Materials development, assessment and evaluation of learners’ needs and interests in teaching English as an academic second Language to international students attending universities with English instruction. Level: Graduate
  • LING 570 - Seminar in Linguistics

    Credits: 3. (R–12) Offered autumn and spring.  Advanced topics in linguistic analysis. Level: Graduate
  • LING 571 - Phonetics and Phonology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  A study of phonetic and phonological systems from as many as 20 languages, most of them non–Indo–European; training in how to do linguistic analysis as well as linguistic theory. This course co-convenes with LING 471. Graduate students taking LING 571 will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 572 - Generative Syntax

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., LING 470 or equivalent.An investigation of human language sentence–formation systems, construed as functions (combinatorial computations) mapping utterances (physical sounds) to propositions (mental meanings). Emphasis on abstracting away from observable cross-linguistic data in favor of underlying formal (i.e., computational) structures. This course is co-convened with LING 472. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 573 - Language and Culture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Technical study of the relationships between grammatical categories and world view. This course co-convenes with LING 473. Graduate students will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 574 - Historical Linguistics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. An introduction to the study of language change over time. Topics include:methods for studying language change (the comparative method and internal reconstruction); types of language change (sound change, borrowing, analogical change, lexical, syntactic, and semantic change); and explanations for language change. The principles of historical reconstruction and comparative method in the analysis of linguistic variation and change. This course co-convenes with LING 474. Graduate students will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 575 - Linguistic Field Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years.  Writing up linguistic data; developing techniques for eliciting linguistic data by working with a native speaker of a less commonly taught language. This courses co-convenes with LING 475. Graduate students will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 584 - NA Indigenous Lang and Ling

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Description and analysis of grammatical features of Indigenous languages of North America. This course co-convenes with LING 484. Graduate students will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 589 - Morphology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  A survey of the morphological features of several unrelated languages to provide the student with a broad overview of how languages compare and contrast. This course co-convenes with LING 489. Graduate students taking LING 589 will complete additional requirements and their work will be of a more advanced nature. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • LING 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R–9) Offered intermittenly. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one–time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LING 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R–6) Offered intermittenly. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
  • LING 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered intermittenly. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LING 599 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered intermittenly. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the indiviumdual student. Level: Graduate
  • LING 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R–6) Offered autumn and spring. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Biochemistry

  • BCH 110 - Intro Biology for Biochemists

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq. CHMY 141N or equivalent. Prereq. or Coreq., CHMY 143N. Coreq., BCH 111.  An introductory course that explores biomolecules and their roles in life processes.  Provides a foundation for Cellular and Molecular Biology (BIOB 260), Genetics and Evolution (BIOB 272), Introductory Biochemistry Seminar (BCH 294), and many other advanced science courses.
  • BCH 111 - Intro Biol for Biochemists Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring.  Prereq., CHMY 141N or equivalent. Prereq., or Coreq., CHMY 143N. Coreq., BCH 110. Introduction to the experimental techniques used to study biomolecules and their roles in life processes.  Provides a foundation for other advanced level laboratory courses in chemistry and biochemistry.
  • BCH 294 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1. Offered spring.  Prereq., BCH 110/111 or equivalent. An introduction to important advances in biochemistry through readings from the primary literature and discussion of this literature.  Faculty members will also make presentations on their research. Graded credit/no credit.
  • BCH 380 - Biochemistry

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., CHMY 223 or BIOB 260.  Fundamental biochemistry; chemistry and metabolism of biomolecules, energy relationships in metabolism; storage, transmission, and expression of genetic information.  Credit not allowed for both BCH 380 and 480-482.
  • BCH 480 - Advanced Biochemistry I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 223. Primarily for science majors. The chemistry of biomolecules, with emphasis on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. The chemistry and regulation of the transfer and expression of genetic information, protein synthesis. Credit not allowed for both BCH 380 and 480-482.
  • BCH 482 - Advanced Biochemistry II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BCH 480 or equiv. Continuation of BCH 480. Enzyme kinetics, metabolism, especially macromolecule biosyntheses and energy acquisition pathways, and the associated energetics and molecular physiology. Credit not allowed for both BCH 380 and BCH 480-482.
  • BCH 486 - Biochemistry Research Lab

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BCH 380 or 480. Applications of biochemical principles to modern protein biochemistry.  Basic micro- and molecular biology techniques are used to produce mutant proteins; then students learn basic and advanced biophysical techniques to characterize the mutant proteins.
  • BCH 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Consent of instr. Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • BCH 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BCH 499 - Senior Thesis/Capstone

    Credits: 3 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., senior standing and consent of instr. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on undergraduate research for presentation and/or publication. Student must give an oral or poster presentation at the Undergraduate Research Symposium or a scientific meeting.
  • BCH 547 - Exptl Mol/Cell/Chem Biol

    Credits: 1. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Same as BIOB 547. Focus on experimental design, methods, and presentation of experimental results for graduate students in laboratories with a molecular, cellular or chemical biological focus. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 561 - RNA Structure & Function

    Credits: 1. (R-8) Offered every semester. Prereq., BCH 482, BIOB 260, and consent of instr. Exploration of current scientific literature and new data that focuses on RNA biochemistry. Emphasis on literature relevant to research on RNA viruses and ribosomes and protein synthesis. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 570 - Intro to Research

    Credits: 1. (R-2) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing.  Required course for Biochemistry and Biophysics graduate students. Students are acquainted with faculty research projects. Instruction in basic research techniques, research equipment. Introduction to relevant scientific research literature.  Level: Graduate
  • BCH 581 - Physical Biochemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered spring odd-numbered years. Prereq., CHMY 360 or CHMY 373 or CHMY 371; BCH 480. Techniques of physical chemistry used in studying biological structure and function of macromolecules. Emphasis is on spectroscopic methods, hydrodynamic methods and x-ray and other scattering and diffraction techniques. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 582 - Proteins and Enzymes

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years.  Prereq., BCH 482 or equivalent. An investigation into the structure/function relationship in proteins and a detailed exploration of enzyme kinetics, using examples from current literature. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 584 - Nucleic Acids

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years. Prereq., BCH 482 or equivalent. Emphasis on critical reading of current literature that investigates structure, chemistry, and function of nucleic acids. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing and consent of instr. Experimental offering of new courses by resident or visiting faculty. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 18. (R-18) Offered intermittently. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the background and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently. Prereq., master's student in biochemistry and biophysics. Laboratory research for and preparation of a master's thesis. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 600 - Cell Organization & Mechanisms

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., BCH 480 or consent of instr. Same as BMED 600. Primary literature exploration of the regulation of structure, function, and dynamics of eukaryotic cells. Topics include membranes, cytoskeleton, transcription, translation, signal transduction, cell motility, cell proliferation, and programmed cell death. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 694 - Biochemistry & Biophysics Sem.

    Credits: 1. (R-10) Credit/No credit only. Offered Autumn and Spring. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instructor. Presentation of current research in Structural Biology, Biochemistry, Biophysics, or related fields by invited outside speakers, UM faculty, and senior graduate students. Level: Graduate
  • BCH 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 20. (R-20) Offered intermittently. Prereq., doctoral student in biochemistry. Laboratory research for and preparation of a doctoral dissertation. Level: Graduate

Chemistry

  • CHMY 104 - Preparation for Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq. ALEKS Level 3 or M 090 Introductory Algebra w/ C– or better. An introduction to chemistry for those who believe they have an inadequate background to enroll in CHMY 121N or 141N. Not appropriate toward chemistry requirement in any major.
  • CHMY 121N - Intro to General Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. First semester of an introduction to general, inorganic, organic and biological chemistry.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • CHMY 122 - Intro to Gen Chem Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., Enrolled in the College of Technology ASRN program.  Prereq. or coreq., CHMY 121N or equivalent.  A laboratory course emphasizing inorganic chemistry, quantitative relations and synthesis of inorganic and organic compounds.
  • CHMY 123 - Intro to Organic & Biochem

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., "C-" or equiv. in CHMY 121N or CHMY 141N or consent of instr. Second semester of an introduction to general, inorganic, organic and biological chemistry.
  • CHMY 124 - Intro to Organic & Biochem Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq. or coreq., CHMY 123. Laboratory to accompany CHMY 123.
  • CHMY 141N - College Chemistry I

    Credits: 5. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., ALEKS Placement Level 4 or M 095 Intermediate Algebra w/ C- or better. For science majors and other students intending to take more than one year of chemistry. Properties of elements, inorganic compounds, liquid solutions, chemical equilibria and chemical kinetics. Includes laboratory.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • CHMY 143N - College Chemistry II

    Credits: 5. Offered spring and summer. Prereq., "C-" or better in CHMY 141N or consent of instr. A continuation of CHMY 141N. Includes Laboratory.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • CHMY 191 - Special Topics/Expmntl Crse

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CHMY 221 - Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 123N or 143N. The chemical and physical properties of organic compounds.
  • CHMY 222 - Organic Chemistry I Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Coreq., CHMY 221; prereq., one semester of 100-level laboratory. Microscale techniques are emphasized.
  • CHMY 223 - Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 221. Continuation of 221.
  • CHMY 224 - Organic Chemistry II Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 222; prereq. or coreq., CHMY 223.
  • CHMY 290 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • CHMY 291 - Special Topics/Expmntl Crse

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CHMY 292 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., one semester of chemistry and consent of instr. Laboratory investigations and research in the laboratory of a faculty member.
  • CHMY 294 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Topic varies.
  • CHMY 305E - Ethics and Writing in Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., CHMY 223 and chemistry or biochemistry majors. Practicum for developing and improving skills in scientific writing and evaluation. Presentation, discussion and written evaluations of standard ethics traditions and ethical issues related to the professional practice of science. Use of library and search tools to access current literature in chemistry.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • CHMY 311 - Analytical Chem-Quant Analysis

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., one year of college chemistry, including laboratory. Classroom and laboratory work in gravimetric, volumetric, colorimetric and electrochemical methods of analysis; theory of errors; ionic equilibria in aqueous solutions.
  • CHMY 360 - Applied Physical Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 123 OR 143 AND M 162. Basic thermodynamics and chemical kinetics with applications in the biological and environmental sciences. Credit not allowed for both 360 and 373.
  • CHMY 371 - Phys Chem-Qntm Chm & Spctrscpy

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 373. Systematic treatment of the laws and theories relating to chemical phenomena.
  • CHMY 373 - Phys Chem-Kntcs & Thrmdynmcs

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 143N, M 273, PHSX 207N or 217N. Systematic treatment of the laws and theories relating to chemical phenomena. Credit not allowed for both CHMY 360 and 373.
  • CHMY 390 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1. Offered every term. Prereq., CHEM 161N-162N with B or better and consent of instr. Methods of peer-led team learning as applied to general chemistry instruction. Review of concepts from general chemistry. Student leaders mentor a team of general chemistry students in working toward constructing chemistry knowledge and developing problem-solving skills.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • CHMY 391 - Special Topics/Expmntl Crse

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CHMY 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CHMY 397 - Teaching Chemistry

    Credits: 1. Offered every term.  Prereq., CHMY 141N-143N with B or better and consent of instr.  Methods of peer-led  team learning as applied to general chemistry instruction.  Review of concepts from general chemistry.  Student leaders mentor a team of general chemistry students in working toward constructing chemistry knowledge and developing problem-solving skills.
  • CHMY 398 - Internship/Cooperative Educ

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CHMY 401 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 223 AND 360 OR 373 or consent of instr. Theory and principles of inorganic chemistry and a systematic coverage of descriptive inorganic chemistry in the context of the periodic table.
  • CHMY 402 - Advanced Inorganic Chem Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 224 AND 360 or 373 and consent of instr. Preparation of inorganic and coordination compounds. Isolation and characterization by ion exchange, column chromatography, IR, UV-VIS, derivatives, MP, and BP.
  • CHMY 403 - Descriptive Inorganic Chem

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 221-222, 360 or 373-371, and 401. A survey of the chemistry of the elements including transition metal reaction mechanisms, redox chemistry, organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry.
  • CHMY 411 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Prereqs., CHMY221 and CHMY223 (the sophomore organic chemistry sequence).The course is study of organic chemistry which covers chemoinformatics, structure and conformation, acid-base properties, kinetics/thermodynamics, mechanisms and reactivity, and synthetic strategy and key reactions.
  • CHMY 421 - Advanced Instrument Analysis

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 311. Theory and use of instrumental methods in the study of analytical and physical chemistry.
  • CHMY 442 - Aquatic Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years.  Prereq., CHMY 311 or consent of instr. Application of chemical equilibria theory for understanding and modeling chemical processes in natural waters with an emphasis on spreadsheet computations.  In depth examination of concepts such as pH, alkalinity, buffering, and solubility as they apply to natural waters.
  • CHMY 445 - Indstrl Chm & Its Impct on Soc

    Credits: 3. Offered every other autumn semester.  Prereq., CHMY 143 or 123.  A course based on local Montana chemical industries involving field trips to chemical plants, visits by company personnel and an overall evaluation of the company=s economic and environmental impact on the community.
  • CHMY 465 - Organic Spectroscopy

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CHMY 360 or 373 and one year of organic chemistry or consent of instr. Theory and interpretation of the NMR, IR, UV, and mass spectra of organic compounds with the goal of structure identification.
  • CHMY 466 - FT-NMR Optn for Undrgrd Rsrch

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CHMY 221-222; research project using NMR; consent of instr. Operation of the FT-NMR spectrometer and brief background of NMR spectroscopy.
  • CHMY 485 - Laboratory Safety

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., one year of college chemistry. Awareness of and methods of control of hazards encountered in laboratory work. Awareness of legal constraints on work with chemicals. Sources of information regarding chemical hazards.
  • CHMY 488 - Forensic Research

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn, spring and summer.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Laboratory investigations and research on forensic chemistry topics under the direction of a faculty member.
  • CHMY 489 - Forensic Research Seminar

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn.  Prereq., CHMY 421 and ANTH 286N.  Seminar speakers on forensic science topics in the areas of ethics, law, anthropology and criminology; tours of the Montana State Crime Laboratory.
  • CHMY 490 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 9. Undergraduate Research Variable cr (R-9). Offered autumn, spring, and summer. Prereq., consent of instr. Laboratory investigations and research in the laboratory of a faculty member.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • CHMY 491 - Special Topics/Expmntl Crse

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CHMY 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Laboratory investigations and research in the laboratory of a faculty member.
  • CHMY 494 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Laboratory investigations and research in the laboratory of a faculty member.
  • CHMY 498 - Internship/Cooperative Educ

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Prereq., consent of department. Extended non-classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CHMY 499 - Senior Thesis/capstone

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., CHMY 490 or consent of instr. and senior standing. Students complete and report on undergraduate research initiated as CHEM 490 or equivalent research experience.  Reports are both oral and written.
  • CHMY 501 - Teaching University Chemistry

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn.  Preparation for teaching chemistry at the college level. A survey of teaching fundamentals and educational psychology as applied to chemistry instruction. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 541 - Environmental Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CHMY 360 OR 373. Chemical principles and reactions in natural systems: Fate of chemical contaminants in the environment; partitioning of contaminants between phases (air/water/soil); chemistry of atmospheric pollutants; computer modeling of equilibrium and kinetic processes; degradation and transformation of organic contaminants. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 542 - Separation Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn odd-numbered years.  Prereq., CHMY 421, CHMY 360 or 373.  Theory, method development, and application of analytical separations; solvent extraction; solid phase extraction; various forms of chromatography; electrophoresis. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 544 - Applied Spectroscopy

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., CHMY 421 or consent of instr. The function and application of optical (ultraviolet to infrared) chemical instrumentation.  Specific topics include optics, light sources, detectors and a wide variety of spectrochemical methods with an emphasis on methods not typically covered in undergraduate instrumental analysis courses. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 553 - Inor Chem and Curr Lit

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., CHMY 401. A survey of the elements including transition metal reaction mechanisms, redox chemistry, organomatallic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry. Oral and written presentations on primary literature. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 562 - Org Structure and Mech

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., one year of organic chemistry.  Topics may include: stereochemistry, conformational analysis, aromaticity, transition sate theory, isotope effects, solvent effects, substitution and elimination reactions, and mechanisms that involve carbocations, carbanions, radicals and carbenes as reactive intermediates. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 563 - Organic Synthesis

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., CHMY 221-223.  Theoretical treatise of the common methods used in organic synthesis including: oxidation, reduction, organometallics, C-C bond forming reactions, synthetic strategies and total synthesis. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 566 - FT-NMR for Graduates

    Credits: 1. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CHMY 221-222; research project using NMR; consent of instr.  Operation of the FT-NMR spectrometer and brief background of NMR spectroscopy. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 568 - Organometallic Chemistry

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently in autumn.  Prereq., CHMY 221, 223, 401, 403.  Survey of the reactivity and structure of main group and transition metal organometallic compounds with an emphasis on applications to organic synthesis and catalysis. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 573 - Advanced Physical Chem

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CHMY 371-373.  Fundamental principles of physical chemistry and special applications. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 580 - Adv Graduate Res Seminars

    Credits: 1. (R-10) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Formal oral and written presentations of research results and selected literature topics in a designated area.  Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 593 - Professional Project

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a professional project appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • CHMY 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 8. (R-8) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of department. Extended non-classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CHMY 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 630 - Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-14) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in chemistry or biochemistry, or consent of instr. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 640 - Intro Grad Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-20) Offered autumn.  Prereq., graduate standing in chemistry or biochemistry or consent of instr.  Seminar to acquaint new graduate students with departmental research. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 650 - Graduate Chemistry Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-2) Offered spring.  Prereq., graduate standing. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 652 - Original Research Proposal

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 640 and CHMY 650. Preparation and presentation of original research proposals for third year graduate students. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 697 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-60) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • CHMY 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered autumn and spring. Preparation of extensive thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Communication

  • COMX 111A - Intro to Public Speaking

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Preparation, presentation, and criticism of speeches. Emphasis on the development of public speaking techniques through constructive criticism. Credit not allowed for both COMM 111A and COM 160A.
    Course Attributes:
    • Expressive Arts Course (A)
  • COMX 115S - Intro to Interpersonal Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. An overview of the process of human communication with special emphasis on analyzing communication patterns and improving interpersonal communication skills. Credit not allowed for both COMM 110S and COM 150S.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • COMX 191S - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • COMX 202S - Nonverbal Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Nonverbal code systems and how they function in human communication including gestures, facial expressions, personal space, and others.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • COMX 204X - International & Dvlpmnt Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. International Communication is concerned with information exchange across national borders while Development Communication focuses on the historical, current, and prospective role of communication technologies in social change, improving living conditions, and enhancing life prospects - mainly in developing countries.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • COMX 210 - Communication in Small Groups

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Theory and research related to communication roles, collaboration, cohesion, leadership, and decision-making. Experiences provided in task oriented groups and field analyses of group processes.
  • COMX 220S - Intro to Organizational Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Theory and research on communication in organizations. Focus on topics such as productivity, power, culture, socialization, technology and globalization covering a wide range of organizations including corporations, government, educational institutions, non-profit agencies and media organizations.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • COMX 222 - Professional Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Explores communication skills needed in business and professional contexts. Focus on developing a working knowledge of theory and skills for interpersonal communication, group communication, and business writing. Concepts include communication processes, diversity in the workplace, nonverbal communication, technical communication, communication with customers, and employment communication. 
  • COMX 240H - Intro to Rhetorical Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. An overview of rhetorical theory including an exploration of classical rhetoric, British and Continental rhetorical theory, and contemporary theories of language and persuasion.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
  • COMX 241 - Persuasive Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. The use of communication in attitude and behavior change as experienced in personal, organizational, and public contexts.
  • COMX 242 - Argumentation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring on the Mountain campus, offered intermittently on the Missoula College campus. Development of argumentation skills and critical judgment in decision-making and debate. Includes criticism, construction, presentation, and refutation of spoken and written arguments.
  • COMX 311 - Family Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. An examination of communication in marriage/romantic partnership, parent-child, and extended family relationships. Topics include intimacy, power, decision-making, problem solving, identity formation, and interpersonal perception.
  • COMX 312 - Forensics/Honors

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-12) Offered every term. Preparation and participation in competitive speech and debate, including Lincoln/Douglas and Parliamentary debate. The team travels to regional competitions and hosts on-campus and intramural debates and speaking events. Up to 6 credits may apply toward a major or minor in communication studies.
  • COMX 343 - Persuasive Speaking and Critic

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Prereq., COMM 111A or consent of instructor. The persuasive process through the criticism and creation of speeches and other rhetorical artifacts emphasizing the role persuasion plays in creating and shaping our culture.
  • COMX 347 - Rhetoric Nature & Environmtlsm

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Same as ENST 377. Survey of rhetorical texts that shape public understanding of nature and environmental issues. Analysis of a range of historical and contemporary environmental texts using theoretical concepts from the rhetorical tradition.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 349 - Comm Consump & Climate

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Same as CCS 349. Analyzes consumption as a communication practice, investigates discourses that promote consumption, and illuminates environmental impacts on consumption.
  • COMX 351 - Principles of Public Relations

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. The many uses of communication in the endeavor of public relations. Communication theories and models including interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and mass communication are applied to explore the internal and external communication behavior associated with public relations.
  • COMX 352 - Public Relations Portfolio

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Writing documents such as press releases, fact sheets, brochures and speeches to create relationships between organizations and their publics.
  • COMX 380 - Gender and Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. The meaning of gender in our culture. Examines how gender is displayed and perpetuated through social institutions such as the media and through our private and public verbal and nonverbal interactions.
  • COMX 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • COMX 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Preq., consent of instructor. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (398, 498) may count toward graduation. Offered C/NCR only.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • COMX 412 - Communication and Conflict

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Conceptual and practical discussions of communication and conflict in interpersonal relationships, organizational settings and overall cultural milieu. Topics include culture, power, styles, negotiation and bargaining, mediation, dissent, dispute systems, and crisis communication. Credit is not allowed for both COMM 413 and COMM 412.
  • COMX 413 - Comm & Conflict-Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Conceptual and practical discussions of communication and conflict in interpersonal relationships, organizational settings and overall cultural milieu. Fulfills Upper-Division Writing requirement for Communication Studies majors. Credit is not allowed for both COMX 413 and COMX 412.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 414 - Comm in Personal Relationshps

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Prerequisite, COMX 115S or consent of instructor. An examination of the functions, types, and historical context of close personal relationships with an in-depth study of the role of communication in friendships and romantic relationships.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 415 - Intercultural Communication

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Communication principles and processes in cross-cultural environments. Non-Western cultures are emphasized by contrasting them to Western communication norms.
  • COMX 421 - Comm in Non-Profit Organizatns

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Focuses on issues in nonprofit organizational communication at macro and micro levels. Topics include: organizational identity, change processes, public relations, fund-raising, advocacy, socialization, stress and burnout, board management and professionalization.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 422 - Communication and Technology

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. This course takes a critical look at the influence of communication technologies on organizational communication. Students will examine how the world of work is changing due to new technologies and explore the social and ethical implications of technical innovation, adoption and use.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 423 - Org Comm Consult & Train

    Credits: 3. Offered every year. Prerequisite, COMX 220S or consent of instructor. Not open to PCOM. Emphasis on the theoretical and practical issues involved in communication training and consultation. Overview of theoretical models followed by the "nuts and bolts" of communication training, development, and assessment. Students will carry out a training or consultation project (e.g., planning, execution, and evaluation) to sharpen the issues explored.
  • COMX 424 - Risk Crisis & Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. This course explores the communicative dynamics that both prevent and cause organizational crisis. Through case studies, the class examines how people plan, communicate and make good decisions in high-risk situations, as well as how to manage crisis public relations effectively.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 425 - Comm in Health Organizations

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Not open to PCOM. This course explores the key issues at the intersection of health communication and organizational communication by considering communication processes that occur in a number of distinct contexts of health organizations. Through case studies and health campaigns students explore contemporary concerns and theory in the area of health communication.
  • COMX 445 - Rhetorical Criticism & Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Introduction to study of rhetorical criticism and theory. Current theoretical and methodological issues and approaches including traditional criticism, experiential criticism, dramatism, narrative criticism, feminist criticism, postmodern criticism.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 447 - Rhetorical Constrctn of Woman

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Explores the rhetoric surrounding contemporary women's social "activism" in the U.S. Topics include women's rights, women's liberation, consciousness raising as a rhetorical form, reproductive rights, sexuality, and intersections between gender, race, and class.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 449 - Rhetoric of Women's Activism

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Explores the rhetoric surrounding contemporary women's social "activism" in the U.S. Topics include women's rights, women's liberation, consciousness raising as a rhetorical form, reproductive rights, sexuality, and intersections between gender, race, and class.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • COMX 460 - Research Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Open only to majors in COMM. Prereq., Grade of C- or better in EDLD 486 or PSYX 222 or SOCI 202 or STAT 216. Introduction to the major types of communication research and the foundations of quantitative research methods.
  • COMX 461 - Communication Research Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. coreq., COMX 460. Application of quantitative and qualitative research methods to specialized contexts. Emphasis on direct student involvement in research activities.
  • COMX 485 - Communication and Health

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Theory and research on the health correlates of human interaction.
  • COMX 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Not open to PCOM. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • COMX 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instructor. Offered C/NCR only.
  • COMX 510 - Sem Personal Relationships

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered yearly. Examines theory and research on the process and functions of communication in personal relationship contexts. Interdisciplinary readings illuminates the dynamics of communication in the development, maintenance, and deterioration of romantic relationships, friendships, and family relationships. Discussion and assignments center around theoretical, methodological, and practical issues in research on communicative activities and events in personal relationships. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 511 - Survey Interpersonal Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Survey of theories and research in interpersonal communication including definitions of interpersonal communication, its place in the field of communication, and methodological issues. Overall emphasis on foundational readings and recent research developments. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 512 - Sem Comm Conflict

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. A review and discussion of current research regarding conflict in different levels and contexts of communication. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 514 - Alt Dispute Resolution

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Same as LAW 614. A study of the varieties of dispute resolution vehicles outside the court process. Focus on a 40-hour component of practical skills training for the mediation practitioner. Topics include the mediation model, interest-based negotiation and effective communication. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 515 - Enviro Negotiation Mediation

    Credits: 3. Same as NRSM 515 and ENST 515. This course prepares students to effectively engage in multiparty negotiation on natural resource and environmental issues. It is grounded in theory and provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in both negotiation and facilitation/mediation. Guest speakers, case studies, and simulations allow students to develop, test, and refine best practices. The course is face-paced, highly interactive, and serves as the second of three required courses in the Natural Resources Conflict Resolution Program. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 520 - Sem in Organiz Communication

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered every other year. Introduction to theories and research in organizational communication. Topics include culture, networks, structure, technology, identity, power, resistance, gender, and globalization. Overall emphasis on foundational readings and recent research developments. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 540 - Sem Instructional Comm

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Instruction in the theories, concepts, principles, and skills employed university level classroom communication and instruction. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 541 - COMM Teaching Methods

    Credits: 2. (R-8) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Restricted to Communication majors only. Offered C/NCR only. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 555 - Sem Rhet Crit & Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered annually. Introduction to contemporary issues in rhetorical criticism and theory.  Methods reviewed include classical criticism, dramatism, close textual analysis, ideographic criticism, narrative criticism, feminist criticism, and postmodern criticism. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 561 - Qual Research Methods

    Credits: 3. Offered every year. An emphasis on the philosophy and practice of qualitative inquiry, the development and use of descriptive frameworks, and gathering and testing qualitative data to develop human communication theory. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 572 - Family Law Mediation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as LAW 672. Interdisciplinary course on advanced mediation skills with a focus on family mediation including divorce and other types of family problems. Psychological issues for both children and parents, power balancing, gender issues and interest-based negotiation model. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 575 - Sem:Rhet&Env'l Controversy

    Credits: 3. Offered every other year. Same as ENST 575. The study of how advocates use symbols to influence meaning and action in environmental controversies. Rhetorical theory is used to identify, analyze, and evaluate persuasive strategies and tactics. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 585 - Comm Across Sciences

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. Focus on communication practices that facilitate interdisciplinary interactions across the sciences and result in more competent communication. Offered only to graduate student trainees enrolled in the M-EID program. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 591 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 593 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 594 - Topical Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • COMX 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • COMX 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Computer Applications

  • CAPP 171 - Communicating via Computers

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., previous computer experience or consent of instr. The use of the computer for information presentation and communication; emphasis placed on the use of electronic resources for the access, management, and presentation of information. Students taking CS classes with computer programming components should expect to use additional computer lab time outside of class.

Computer Science/Programming

  • CSCI 100 - Intro to Programming

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. This course covers basic programming concepts such as variables, data types, iteration, flow of control, input/output, functions, and objects. The course will also cover programming ideas such as data structures, algorithms, modularity, and debugging. Students will learn about the role computation can play in solving problems by writing interesting programs to solve useful goals. No prior programming experience is expected. (Two hours independent lab per week.) Credit not allowed for both CSCI 100 and CSCI 110.
  • CSCI 105 - Computer Fluency

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Introduces the skills and concepts of information technology, both from practical and a more theoretical point of view. During lectures and interactive computer labs, students will explore a wide range of digital and information technologies, including common PC applications, networking, databases, privacy, and security. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 105 and CRT 111 and CS 111.
  • CSCI 106 - Careers in Computer Science

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn.  Exploration of various careers available in the general area of Computer Science.  Includes discussion of strategies for success in the major.  Computer Science faculty members also will discuss possible undergraduate research opportunities and motivation for graduate education.
  • CSCI 135 - Fund of Computer Science I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., computer programming experience in a language such as BASIC, Pascal, C, etc. Fundamental computer science concepts using the high level structured programming language, Java.
  • CSCI 136 - Fund of Computer Science II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., CSCI 135; coreq., M 115 or M 151 or consent of instr. Continuation of CSCI 135. Survey of computer science topics including recursion, algorithms, basic data structures, operating systems, artificial intelligence, graphics, user interfaces, and social and ethical implications of computing.
  • CSCI 172 - Intro to Computer Modeling

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Problem solving and data modeling using computer productivity software. Emphasis using spreadsheets and database for data analysis. Credit not allowed for CSCI 172, CRT 172, and CS 172.
  • CSCI 181 - Web Design and Programming

    Credits: 3. Electronic Publishing on the World Wide Web
  • CSCI 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 0 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Students taking CS classes with computer programming components should expect to use additional computer lab time outside of class.
  • CSCI 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements on and off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSCI 205 - Programming Languages w/ C/C++

    Credits: 4. Offered spring.  Prereq., CSCI 232 and M 225.  Concepts and principles of programming languages with an emphasis on C, C++, and object-oriented programming.  Syntax and semantics of object-oriented languages.  Principles and implementation of late binding, memory allocation and de-allocation, type-checking, scope, polymorphism, inheritance.
  • CSCI 216E - Technology, Ethics & Society

    Credits: 3. An examination of ethical issues related to new technologies in the context of ethical theory in the western secular tradition. Focus will be on applying central concepts, principles, and problems of ethical theory to particular areas of technology, such as artificial intelligence and robotics, social networks, nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and privacy in a digital age.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • CSCI 232 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., 'B-' or better in CSCI 136; or consent of instr. Abstract data types, algorithm analysis, stacks, queues, lists, recursion, trees, hashing, graphs, and applications of data structures in algorithm development. Python programming language used.
  • CSCI 250 - Computer Mdlng/Science Majors

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., basic computer and spreadsheet literacy; coreq., M 162 or 171.  An introduction to programming in Python with an emphasis on problems arising in the sciences, including: function plotting, data fitting, file input/output, solving ordinary differential equations, matrix manipulation, and sensor networks. A student can take at most one of CSCI 172, CSCI 250, CRT 280, and CRT 281 for credit.
  • CSCI 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Lower-Division
  • CSCI 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements on and off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSCI 315E - Computers, Ethics, and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., University approved intermediate level writing course. Ethical problems that computer scientists face. The codes of ethics of professional computing societies. The social implications of computers, computing, and other digital technologies.
    Course Attributes:
    • Ethical & Human Values Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • CSCI 323 - Software Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CSCI 136. Study, implementation, and assessment of software processes, techniques, methods, and CASE tools.  Project management and cost estimation techniques will be examined.  A group project may be required.
  • CSCI 332 - Design/Analysis of Algorithms

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSCI 232 and M 225 or consent of instr. Algorithm design, analysis, and correctness. Commonly used algorithms including searching and sorting, string search, dynamic programming, branch and bound, graph algorithms, and parallel algorithms. Introduction to NP-complete problems.
  • CSCI 340 - Database Design

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., CSCI 232 or consent of instr.  Fundamentals of data modeling, the relational mode, normal forms, file organization, index structures and SQL.  Major project involving the design and implementation of a relational database.
  • CSCI 361 - Computer Architecture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., CSCI 136 or consent of instr.  Functional view of computer system components, BCPU, ALU, memory, bus, cache, I/O module.  Instruction set design: formats, addressing modes.  Basic circuit design.  Pipelining and assembly language.  Interrupt handling.  Implementation of ALU and control unit.  Detailed design of an RISC-like instruction set.  Datapath and performance comparisons.  Basic multiprocessor design.
  • CSCI 390 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • CSCI 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., junior standing. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CSCI 394 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Guidance in special work.
  • CSCI 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Business or government internship. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Only three credits applicable to computer science major or minor. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSCI 411 - Advanced Web Programming

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 136.  Programming and software development techniques for developing web-based applications.  Scripting and other programming languages that are used for web-based development.
  • CSCI 412 - Game and Mobile App

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232 and 323. Programming and software development techniques for developing gaming and mobile applications. Multiple gaming environments and mobile programming languages are introduced and examined to build modern applications.
  • CSCI 426 - Adv Prgrmng Theory/Practice I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CSCI 205, 232, 323 and M 225, or consent of instr. Examination and implementation of modern best practices in the areas of software design, coding, testing and maintenance. Focus on design patterns and design pattern languages used to build modern software systems in a variety of areas.
  • CSCI 427 - Adv Prgrmng Theory/Practice II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSCI 426. Design and implementation of a major software project in a group setting, with required documentation, presentation, installation, and approval by the instructor.
  • CSCI 438 - Theory of Computation

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 225 or M 307. This course focuses on understanding the limitations & capabilities of abstract models of computation, through rigorous mathematical analysis. Topics will include finite & pushdown automata, nondeterministic computation, regular expressions, generative grammars, Turing machines, undecidability, and computational complexity.
  • CSCI 441 - Computer Graphics Programming

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232 and M 221 or consent of instr. The graphics pipeline, its implementation in hardware and emphasis on the programmable portions of the pipeline. Matrix transformations for modeling, viewing, clipping, and windowing. Application of lighting, coloring, and texturing models. Hierarchical modeling of objects. Programmable shaders. OpenGL and WebGL.
  • CSCI 443 - User Interface Design

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232 or consent of instr. Introduction to usability and key concepts of human behavior. Focus on the process of user-centered design, including requirements specification, prototyping, and methods of evaluation. Incorporation of regular design critiques of classmates' work, and emphasis on both oral and written communication skills. Credit not allowed for CSCI 543 and this course.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 444 - Data Visualization

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 171; programming experience; and junior, senior, or graduate status; or consent of instr. Visualization fundamentals and applications using special visualization software; formulation of 3-D empirical models; translation of 3-D models into graphical displays; time sequences and pseudo-animation; interactive versus presentation techniques; special techniques for video, CD and other media.
  • CSCI 446 - Artificial Intelligence

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 225 or M 307, and CSCI 232, or consent of instr. Using computers and software to solve problems that require intelligence. Specific topics may include knowledge representation, logical and probabilistic reasoning, machine learning, planning, game playing, information retrieval, computer vision, and robotics.
  • CSCI 447 - Machine Learning

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., CSCI 232 or consent of instr.  Introduction to the framework of learning from examples, various learning algorithms such as neural networks, and generic learning principles such as inductive bias, Occam's Razor, and data mining.  Credit not allowed for both CSCI 447 and CSCI 547.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 448 - Pattern Recognition

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., Junior or Senior status. Introduction to the framework of unsupervised learning techniques such as clustering (agglomerative, fuzzy, graph theory based, etc.), multivariate analysis approaches (PCA, MDS, LDA, etc.), image analysis (edge detection, etc.), as well as feature selection and generation. Emphasis will be on the underlying algorithms and their implementation. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 448 and CSCI 548.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 451 - Computational Biology

    Credits: 3. Offered Autumn. Designed for attendance by both computer scientists and biologists. The course will explore the interdisciplinary nature at the juncture of the two fields. Students will be introduced to bioinformatics (emphasis: computational genomics), with exposure to fundamental problems, algorithms, and tools in the field. This includes a basic introduction to genomics, along with in-depth coverage of algorithms and methods relevant to modern computational genomics, including: biological sequence alignment, sequence database homology search, and phylogeny inference. The programming expectations are limited for a 400-level computer science course, but at least one semester of a programming-intensive course is required. Credit not allowed for CSCI 558 and this course
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 460 - Operating Systems

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CSCI 232, or consent of instr. Operating system design principles. Processes, threads, synchronization, deadlock, memory management, file management and file systems, protection, and security, comparison of commonly used existing operating systems, writing programs that make use of operating system services. It is recommended, but not required, that the student also attend Programming Languages (in order to be prepared to write C programs) and Architecture (in order to understand interactions between the operating system and processor hardware) prior to attending this course.
  • CSCI 464 - Applications of Mining Big Data

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., upper division or consent of instr. Co-convenes with CSCI 564. Introduction to existing data mining software systems and their use, with focus on practical exercises. Topics include data acquisition, data cleansing, feature selection, and data analysis. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 464 and CSCI 564.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 466 - Networks

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., CSCI 232. Concepts and practice of computer networking, network protocol layers, switching, routing, flow, and congestion control.  Network programming.
  • CSCI 477 - Simulation

    Credits: 3. Co-convene with CSCI 577. Prereq., M 172, CSCI 135, or consent of instr. Matrix languages. ODE solving; Euler-Richardson, Runge-Kutta, PDE solving; finite differences, finite elements, multi-grid techniques. Discrete methods for solution, renormalization group method, critical phenomena. Emphasis on presentation of results and interactive programs. Credit not allowed for CSCI 577 and this course.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 480 - Applied Parallel Computing Techniques

    Credits: 3. Prereq., CSCI 205 and 232, or instructor consent. This course is an introduction to parallelism and parallel programming. Topics include the various forms of parallelism on modern computer hardware (e.g. SIMD vector instructions, GPUs, multiple cores, and networked clusters), with coverage of locality and latency, shared vs non-shared memory, and synchronization mechanisms (locking, atomicity, etc). We will introduce patterns that appear in essentially all programs that need to run fast. We will discuss how to recognize these patterns in a variety of practical problems, discuss efficient algorithms for implementing them, and how to compose these patterns into larger applications. We will address computer architecture at a high level, sufficient to understand the relative costs of operations like arithmetic and data transfer. We also introduce useful tools for debugging correctness and performance of parallel programs. Assignments will include significant parallel programming projects. Co-convenes with CSCI 580. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 480 and CSCI 580.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 490 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • CSCI 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CSCI 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • CSCI 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Guidance in special work.
  • CSCI 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered Intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Business or government internship. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Only three credits of CSCI 398 and/or CSCI 498 applicable to computer science major or minor. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSCI 499 - Senior Thesis/Capstone

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of thesis/project director and chair of the Computer Science Department.  Senior thesis for computer science majors and/or Watkins scholars.
  • CSCI 521 - IT Infrastructure

    Credits: 3. Offered infrequently.  Prereq., CSCI 446 or IS 372 or consent of instr. Identification and classification of background environment, hardware, software, and service components in an enterprise IT environment; management and security concerns for each component; consideration of how the components fit together to form an enterprise information technology environment. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 531 - Desgn & Anal Algorithms

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 332. Algorithm design, analysis, and correctness, with an emphasis on more advanced techniques than covered in CS 332. Design of algorithms by induction. Recurrences and their solutions. Parallel algorithms. Complexity theory: NP-hard and NP-complete problems. Approximation algorithms for intractable problems. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 543 - Human-Computer Interaction

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232 or consent of instr. Principles of good design for interactive systems and web-based applications. User-centered design methodology including requirements specification, low and high-fidelity prototyping, heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, predictive modeling, and usability testing. Advanced HCI research project. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 443 and CSCI 543. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 547 - Machine Learning

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232 or consent of instr. Fundamentals of machine learning including neural networks, decision trees, Bayesian learning, instance-based learning, and genetic algorithms; inductive bias, Occam's razor, and learning theory; data mining; software agents. Credit not allowed for CSCI 447 and CSCI 547. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 548 - Pattern Recognition

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Introduction to the framework of unsupervised learning techniques such as clustering (agglomerative, fuzzy, graph theory based, etc.), multivariate analysis approaches (PCA, MDS, LDA, etc.), image analysis (edge detection, etc.), as well as feature selection and generation. Techniques in exploratory data analysis when faced with large, multivariate datasets. Opportunities at implementation of some algorithmic approaches as well as use of preexisting tools such as the R-project statistics package. Emphasis will be on the underlying algorithms and their implementation. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 448 and CSCI 548. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 555 - Topics Artificial Intelligence

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 225 or M 307, and CSCI 232, or consent of instr. The study and design of artificial intelligent agents. Specific topics may include knowledge representation, logical and probabilistic reasoning, machine learning, planning, game playing, information retrieval, computer vision, and robotics. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 558 - Intro to Bioinformatics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Designed for attendance by both computer scientists and biologists. The course will explore the interdisciplinary nature at the juncture of the two fields. Students will be introduced to bioinformatics (emphasis: computational genomics), with exposure to fundamental problems, algorithms, and tools in the field. This includes a basic introduction to genomics, along with in-depth coverage of algorithms and methods relevant to modern computational genomics, including: biological sequence alignment, sequence database homology search, and phylogeny inference. The programming expectations are limited for a 500-level computer science course, but at least one semester of a programming-intensive course is required. A substantial project is a key component of the course. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 564 - Applications of Mining Big Data

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Co-convenes with CSCI 464. Introduction to existing data mining software systems and their use, with focus on practical exercises. Topics include data acquisition, data cleansing, feature selection, and data analysis. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 464 and CSCI 564. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 577 - Simulation Modeling

    Credits: 3. Co-convene with CSCI 477.  Prereq., M 172, CSCI 135, or consent of instr. Matrix languages. ODE solving; Euler-Richardson, Runge-Kutta, PDE solving; finite differences, finite elements, multi-grid techniques. Discrete methods for solution, renormalization group method, critical phenomena. Emphasis on presentation of results and interactive programs. Conduct, document, and present graduate level research involving computer simulation methods. Credit not allowed for CSCI 477 and this course. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 580 - Parallel Computing

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., CSCI 232, 205. Parallel processing architectures and programming languages. Co-convenes with CSCI 580. Credit not allowed for both CSCI 480 and CSCI 580. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • CSCI 594 - Graduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Seminar on current research topics in computer science. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offering of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • CSCI 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • CSCI 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Business or government internship. Prior approval must be obtained from faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Only three credits applicable to computer science major or minor. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • CSCI 599 - Thesis/Project

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Research for and preparation of the master thesis or professional paper. Level: Graduate

Biology-General

  • BIOB 101N - Discover Biology

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Contemporary exploration of the organization and complexity of living organisms and the systems in which they live.  The central question of biology--relationship between form and function, acquisition and use of energy, and continuity between generations will be addressed through lectures and laboratory investigations.  Credit not allowed toward a major in biology. Credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and BIOB 160N.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 130N - Evolution and Society

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. A focus on relationships between evolutionary biology and important social issues, including the evolution of drug-resistant diseases, the construction and use of genetically-modified organism, human evolutionary biology, and experimental laboratory evolution.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 160N - Principles of Living Systems

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and summer. Unifying principles of biological structure-function relationships at different levels of organization and complexity. Consideration of reproduction, genetics, development, evolution, ecosystems, as well as the inter-relationships of the human species to the rest of life. Students requiring a laboratory should also register for BIOB 161N. Credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and 160N.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 161N - Prncpls of Living Systems Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn and summer. Prereq., or Coreq., BIOB 160N. Lab experiences illustrate biological principles underlying growth, reproduction, development, genetics and physiology, and are designed to give students practice in scientific methods of description, development of hypotheses, and testing.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 170N - Princpls Biological Diversity

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and summer.  Survey of the diversity, evolution and ecology of life including prokaryotes, viruses, protista, fungi, plants and animals.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 171N - Princpls Biological Dvrsty Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered spring and summer.  Coreq., BIOB 170N. The diversity of life including prokaryotes, viruses, protista, fungi, plants and animals including structure and evolutionary relationships.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOB 191N - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 198 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Prereq., consent of Division. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 226N - Gen Science: Earth & Life Sci

    Credits: 5. Offered spring. Prereq., PHSX 225N and M 132 or M 135 or equiv. Integrated lectures, laboratory exercises, and field trips on topics in earth and biological science for prospective elementary school teachers and the non-scientist. A two-hour laboratory session is required each week and one or two Saturday field trips.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOB 260 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn and summer. Prereq. BIOB 160N (preferred) or BCH 110/111 (preferred) or B- or higher in BIOH 112; and either CHMY 123 or CHMY 143. Analytical exploration of the structure and function of the cell, the fundamental unit of life, with an emphasis on energy transformations and information flow. Topics include molecular building blocks, membranes, organelles, and mechanisms of replication, gene expression, metabolism, signal transduction, cell birth, cell death, and cell differentiation.
  • BIOB 272 - Genetics and Evolution

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq., either BIOB 260 OR both BIOB 160N and BIOB 170N/171N; and one of M 121, 122, 151, 162, or 171. Principles and mechanisms of inheritance and evolution. Population genetics, fossil record, macroevolution, speciation, extinction, systematics, molecular evolution.
  • BIOB 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOB 298 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of Division. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of  learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 301 - Developmental Biology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 260; BIOB 272 recommended. An analysis of the origin and development of form and patterns in organisms, stressing the processes of growth and differentiation in plants and animals. Graded traditional letter grade only. 
  • BIOB 375 - General Genetics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260 and 272. This course will focus on the molecular genetics of eukaryotes, with special emphasis on transmission genetics and gene structure and regulation.
  • BIOB 390 - Undergrad Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.  Graded credit/no credit.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • BIOB 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOB 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOB 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of the Division. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 410 - Immunology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 260. Current concepts and methods in Immunology.
  • BIOB 411 - Immunology Laboratory

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn.  Coreq., BIOB 410. Modern techniques for analysis of immune responses.
  • BIOB 425 - Adv Cell & Molecular Biology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260 and 272; BCH 380 strongly recommended.  Cell structure and function, cell cycle, cellular signaling, molecular basis of cancer, regulated cell death, membrane transport, organelle dynamics, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and the molecular basis of learning and memory.
  • BIOB 440 - Biological Electron Microscopy

    Credits: 2. Offered spring.  Prereq., senior standing or consent of instr. Theory of electron microscopy, recent developments in transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Limited experience with the instruments.
  • BIOB 468 - Endocrinology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BIOB 260 and 272.  Integration of fundamental concepts of endocrinology (such as hormone release, hormone transport and receptor activation) into complex systems (such as reproduction). 
  • BIOB 480 - Conservation Genetics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., BIOB 272.  Genetic basis for solving biological problems in conservation including the genetics of small populations, the application of molecular genetic techniques to conservation biology and case studies of the application of genetics to conservation problems. 
  • BIOB 483 - Phylogenics and Evolution

    Credits: 3. Offered alternating spring semesters. Prereq., BIOB 260 and BIOB 272. Phylogenies, or evolutionary trees, provide insights into the history of life on Earth, including our own origins. This course focuses on the theoretical foundations of popular methods of reconstructing phylogenies from molecular sequence data and how to implement these methods with computational software for real data sets. Other current methods for testing evolutionary hypotheses with sequence data will also be introduced.
  • BIOB 486 - Genomics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. Principles and mechanisms of genome biology of animals and microbes, including genome function, evolution, and basic molecular and computational methodology used in genome biology.
  • BIOB 488 - Programming for Biology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 486 or A- or higher in BIOB 272. An introduction to computer programming using genomic and evolutionary examples. No prior programming experience expected or required.
  • BIOB 490 - Adv Undergrad Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term.  Prereq., junior or senior standing and consent of instr.  Independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Graded credit/no credit.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • BIOB 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOB 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent work under the University omnibus option. See index.
    Course Attributes:
    • Omnibus Course
  • BIOB 494 - Seminar in Biology

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
  • BIOB 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered every term.  Prereq., consent of the Division. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 499 - Undergraduate Thesis

    Credits: 3 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term.  Prereq., senior standing and consent of instr.  Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on undergraduate research for presentation and/or publication.  Student must give oral or poster presentation at the Biological Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium or a scientific meeting.  Graded credit/no credit.
  • BIOB 505 - OBE Core Course - Genetics and Evolution

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., graduate standing. Exploration of the fundamental concepts and approaches in evolutionary biology and evolutionary genetics. Lectures and discussions, with an emphasis on primary literature, classic and contemporary. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 506 - OBE Core Course - Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., graduate standing. Broad overview of population and community ecology. Lectures and discussions, introducing theoretic foundations and exploring classic and more recent empirical tests of theory. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 507 - OBE Core Course - Organismal Function

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., graduate standing. Exploration of the physical and chemical mechanisms that underlie the relationship between form and function in organisms. Lectures and discussions are pursued using a comparative, ecological and evolutionary framework. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 513 - Community Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BIOE 370 or equiv., consent of instr. Current concepts of species interactions, succession, food webs, temporal and spatial patterns and quantitative characterization of community structure. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 518 - Plant-Consumer Interactions

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq. BIOE 370 or equiv.  Ecology and evolution of plant-consumer interactions.  Review of classic and contemporary literature on plant-consumer interactions. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 522 - Rdgs Morph, Phys, and Zool

    Credits: 1. (R-8) Prereq., graduate standing and consent of instr. Review and discussion of current literature in the fields of morphology, physiology, and ecology. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 524 - Physiological Plant Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., BIOE 370 and BIOO 433. The physiological basis of plant adaptation and response to the environment. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 526 - Trends in Plant Ecology

    Credits: 2. (R-16) Prereq., graduate standing. Current concepts, theory, and experiments in plant ecology. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 541 - Electron Microscopy Lab

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq. or coreq., BIOB 440 or equiv. Practical laboratory experience in the preparation of various samples and hands-on operation of the transmission and/or scanning electron microscopes. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 547 - Exptl Mol/Cell/Chem Biol

    Credits: 1. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Focus on experimental design, methods, and presentation of experimental results for graduate students in laboratories with a molecular, cellular or chemical biological focus. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 551 - Environmental Field Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Prereq. or coreq.,ENSC 540 or ENST 560. Same as ENSC 551. Designing, executing, and interpreting environmental studies. Project oriented. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 561 - Population Genetics Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 2. (R-12) Prereq., consent of instr. or graduate standing. Current topics in population genetics, evolutionary biology, molecular evolution and related topics. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 565 - Membrane Dynamics Res Sem

    Credits: 1. (R-8) Offered every term. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Focus on experimental design, methods, and presentation of experimental results for students conducting research in membrane cell biology, including membrane trafficking and intracellular signaling. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 594 - Seminar in Biology

    Credits: 1. (R-6) Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr. A review and discussion of current research in biology. Topics vary. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-22) Prereq., graduate standing and consent of instr. Experimental offering of new courses by resident or visiting faculty. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 8. (R-8) Prereq., consent of instr. Credit for independent research project unrelated to thesis or dissertation. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • BIOB 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 8. (R-12) Prereq., consent of instr. Library work involved with preparation of a thesis or dissertation proposal. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 8. (R-8) Prereq., consent of the Division, graduate standing. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOB 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Prereq., masters student in biology. Field and laboratory research on, and writing of, a student's master's thesis. Level: Graduate
  • BIOB 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-20) Prereq., doctoral student in biology. Credit for field and laboratory research on, and writing of, a student's doctoral dissertation. Level: Graduate

Biology - Ecological

  • BIOE 172N - Introductory Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  An introduction to ecological principles, stressing the structure and function of natural communities and examining human's role in these ecosystems.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOE 342 - Field Ecology

    Credits: 5. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOB 272 and one year of college math, including statistics.  The principles and practices of the study of animals and plants in their natural environments, including human influences, with focus on the Crown of the Continent area of the Rock Mountains and taught entirely outdoors.
  • BIOE 370 - General Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. Analysis of the distribution and abundance of plants and animals. Includes individual, population and community-level processes (e.g., population growth and regulation, competition, predation, succession, nutrient cycling, energy flow and community organization).
  • BIOE 371 - Gen Ecology Lab (equiv to 271)

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq. or Coreq., BIOE 370 and either STAT 216 or WILD 240. Methods of describing and testing alternative explanations for patterns in nature. The use of scientific methodology in ecology.
  • BIOE 394 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn.  Preparatory readings and attendance at seminars on a wide variety of ecological and wildlife management topics followed by critiques.
  • BIOE 403 - Vert Design & Evolution

    Credits: 5. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 170N, 171N and 272 and either PHSX 205N/206N or 215N/216N.  Evolutionary patterns of animal morphology and the importance of body size on life history patterns.  Phylogenetic study of major extant and extinct vertebrate groups.  Laboratory includes systematic study of organ systems and workshops in experimental functional morphology.
  • BIOE 406 - Behavior & Evolution

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. Diversity of animal  behavior in an evolutionary context including inheritance of behavior, diets, avoidance responses, mating systems and sexual selection, parental care, and evolution of animal groups and societies. 
  • BIOE 409 - Behavior & Evolution Discussion

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Co-req., BIOE 406. Diversity of animal behavior in an evolutionary context including inheritance of behavior, diets, avoidance responses, mating systems and sexual selection, parental care, and evolution of animal groups and societies. This discussion course complements the lectures of BIOE 406 by examining both landmark and recent literature. It also includes a written component.
  • BIOE 416 - Alpine Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371.  Distribution, abundance and life cycles of plants and animals and their unique ecophysiological adaptations to life in the rigorous environments of the high mountains above the timberline, with emphasis on the Crown of the Continent area.
  • BIOE 428 - Freshwater Ecology

    Credits: 5. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 160N and either CHMY 123N or 143N.  Physical and chemical dynamics of lakes and streams. Diversity, distribution and dynamics of freshwater organisms.
  • BIOE 439 - Stream Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371, CHMY 121N.  The biota and biogeochemical processes of running waters with unifying principles and contemporary research approaches.
  • BIOE 440 - Conservation Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371.  Concepts and approaches for sustaining biodiversity and other natural goods and services provided by terrestrial and aquatic systems.
  • BIOE 447 - Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., BIOB 160N and any ecology-themed course or consent of instr. Introduction to systems thinking and the ecosystem concept, review of water and energy balance, carbon cycling and production processes, nutrient cycling, trophic dynamics, and species effects on ecosystem functioning.
  • BIOE 448 - Terrestrial Plant Ecology

    Credits: 4. Offered alternate autumn. Prereq. BIOB 272N. The interrelationships between plants and plant communities and their natural environment.
  • BIOE 449 - Plant Biogeography

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Description of the distribution of plants and animals at global, continental and regional scales. Analysis of ecological and historical factors influencing distribution and association.
  • BIOE 451 - Landscape Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371.  Biophysical processes that determine landscape and ecosystem structure and function using remote sensing tools, geographic information systems and dynamic models to demonstrate landscape change.
  • BIOE 453 - Ecology of Small & Large Lakes

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station. Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371, CHMY 121N and CHMY 123N.  The physical, chemical and biological characteristics of lake ecosystems with an emphasis on nutrient cycling, food web interactions and water quality.
  • BIOE 458 - Forest and Grassland Ecol

    Credits: 3. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station.  Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371.  Patterns and processes of the forests and grasslands of the northern Rocky Mountains in the context of principles of population community and ecosystem ecology.
  • BIOE 490 - Adv Undergrad Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., junior or senior standing and consent of instr. Independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Graded credit/no credit.
  • BIOE 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-12). Offered intermittently.  Prereq. graduate standing.  Presentations by student, faculty, and associates on issues and topics in their field. Level: Graduate

Biology-Human

  • BIOH 112 - Human Form and Function I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Explores the fundamentals of structure and function at basic cellular and tissue levels, in addition to the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems.
  • BIOH 113 - Human Form and Function II

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Explores the fundamental structures and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.
  • BIOH 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOH 280 - From Molecules to Mind - Fundamentals of Neuroscience

    Credits: 3. Course will focus on the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the functions of the brain and nervous system. The topics will range from the basis of electrical and chemical signaling to the organization of the sensory systems and mechanisms involved in learning, memory, and complex behaviors.
  • BIOH 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOH 365 - Human AP I for Health Profsns

    Credits: 0 TO 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 121N or CHMY 141N; BIOB 160N or BIOH 112 or 113. Introduction to basic cellular structure and function. The fundamental facts and concepts of the anatomy and physiology of cells and tissues, the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous and special senses with an emphasis on clinical application for students preparing for careers in health care. Laboratory component includes presentation of cadaver prosections and models.
  • BIOH 370 - Human AP II for Health Profsns

    Credits: 0 TO 4. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOH 365. The fundamental facts and concepts of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems with an emphasis on clinical application for students preparing for careers in health care. Laboratory component includes presentation of cadaver prosections and models.
  • BIOH 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of the Division. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of learning during placement off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • BIOH 405 - Hematology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., junior level or consent of instr., BIOM 360. Study of blood and diseases of the circulatory system. Blood banking and serology.
  • BIOH 423 - TA: Form & Function I

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-4) Offered autumn. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 112 and 113 and/or one year upper division anatomy and physiology coursework with cadaver lab. Consent of instr. This select group of students teaches regularly scheduled cadaver lab prosection experiences for students enrolled in BIOH 112; assists in preparation and grading of lecture and laboratory visit teaching materials; and assists with proctoring and grading exams of undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 112.
  • BIOH 424 - TA: Form & Function II

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-4) Offered spring. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 112 and 113 and/or one year upper division anatomy and physiology coursework with cadaver lab. Consent of instr. This select group of students teaches regularly scheduled cadaver lab prosection experiences for students enrolled in BIOH 113; assists in preparation and grading of lecture and laboratory visit teaching materials; and assists with proctoring and grading exams of undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 113.
  • BIOH 456 - Cadaver Dissection I

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 365 and 370 or equivalent with cadaver experience. Consent of instr. This course is a practicum that provides the participant the ability to expand their anatomical knowledge base, professional growth, and public speaking skills. The participant will have the unique opportunity to dissect, within a small group, a region of a cadaver and present visible structures to their peers. The cadavers prepared by these students are used for teaching in DBS A&P offerings. Systems presented in autumn semester include integumentary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems.
  • BIOH 457 - Cadaver Dissection II

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 365 and 370 or equivalent with cadaver experience, and a grade of “A” in BIOH 456. Consent of instr. This course is a practicum that provides the participant the ability to expand their anatomical knowledge base, professional growth, and public speaking skills. The participant will have the unique opportunity to dissect, within a small group, a region of a cadaver and present visible structures to their peers. The cadavers prepared by these students are used for teaching in DBS A&P offerings. Systems prepared and presented in spring semester include endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive.
  • BIOH 458 - Neuroscience Research

    Credits: 4. Prereq., senior standing in Neuroscience. Theory and practical experience in neuroscience experiment design, data collection, results analysis and report creation. Students will generally assist with ongoing research as well as attend formal classroom presentations and discussions. Students will be required to work with the course writing instructor to undertake the writing process and develop a primary literature review, an abstract and final report based on the experiments conducted and the data collected. Students with well-developed research ideas and skills may be allowed to undertake supplemental independent research.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • BIOH 461 - Human Anat/Phys I Tutor/Honors

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 365 or equiv. and consent of instr. This select group of students performs tutoring for students enrolled in BIOH 365; assists in preparation and grading of lecture and laboratory course teaching materials to undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 365. Students enrolled in BIOH 461 have the option of co-enrolling in the cadaver dissection course.
  • BIOH 462 - Principles Medical Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., C (2.00) or better in BIOH 365, 370, and either CHMY 123 or 143N or consent of instr. An advanced course in human physiology for students preparing for careers in health care.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • BIOH 463 - Human Anat/Phys II Tutor/Honor

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 370 or equiv. and consent of instr. This select group of students performs tutoring for students enrolled in BIOH370; assists in preparation and grading of lecture and laboratory course teaching materials to undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 370. Students enrolled in BIOH 463 have the option of co-enrolling in the cadaver dissection course.
  • BIOH 470 - Summer Clinical Laboratory

    Credits: 12. Offered summer. Prereq., successful completion of medical laboratory science 3+1 on-campus curriculum, admittance into one of our affiliated clinical practicum programs, and consent of instructor. Professional training in clinical laboratory sciences (medical laboratory science).
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOH 471 - Professional Training I

    Credits: 13. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOH 470. Continuation of BIOH 470. Professional training at clinical site(s).
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOH 472 - Professional Training II

    Credits: 12. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOH 471. Continuation of BIOH 471. Professional training at clinical site(s).
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOH 480 - Tchg Anatomy & Physiology I

    Credits: 3 TO 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 365 and 370 or equiv. and consent of instr. This select group of students assists in preparation and grading of demonstrations and laboratory teaching materials; and provides laboratory anatomy and physiology instruction to undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 365. Students enrolling for the 4 credit option will also provide occasional comparable assistance for BIOH 112.
  • BIOH 481 - Tchg Anatomy & Physiology II

    Credits: 3 TO 4. Offered spring. Prereq., "A" or "B" in BIOH 365 and 370 or equiv. and consent of instr. This select group of students assists in the preparation and grading of demonstrations and laboratory teaching materials; and provides laboratory anatomy and physiology instruction to undergraduate students enrolled in BIOH 370. Students enrolling for the 4 credit option will also provide occasional comparable assistance for BIOH 113.
  • BIOH 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.

Biology

  • BIOL 315 - Peer Advising Internship

    Credits: 1. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., consent of instr.  Supervised training and internship for peer advisors who will gain knowledge and ability to communicate degree requirements and relate the various degree offerings to professional and career goals.  No more than two credits are allowed toward upper-division major requirements.
  • BIOL 435 - Comparative Animal Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260 or equivalent. Animal physiology with emphasis on diversity of functional processes, with strong links to broader ecological and evolutionary contexts.
  • BIOL 484 - Plant Evolution

    Credits: 3. Offered fall, alternate years.  Prereq., BIOB 272. Lecture, reading and discussion on the evolutionary processes that shape major patterns of plant diversity.  Topics include but are not restricted to:  local adaptation, floral and mating system evolution, polyploidy, genome evolution, and speciation.
  • BIOL 492 - Seminars in Ecol & Res Man

    Credits: 1. Offered summers only at Flathead Lake Biological Station. Prereq., BIOE 342 or BIOE 370/371 or taken concurrently with BIOE 342. Seminar course that meets weekly for 2 hours in the evening. Includes seminar speaker and discussion.

Biology-Microbiology

  • BIOM 135N - Hot Spring Micb: Yellowstone

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. A field and laboratory based exploration of the microbial diversity of the thermal features of our first national park. Topics to be discussed include how these communities are shaped by the physical and chemical conditions of the environment and how microorganisms can thrive at life's extremes. Includes a field trip to Yellowstone National Park.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOM 227 - Vectors and Parasites

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., college level general biology class is recommended but not required.  An introduction to the major groups of parasites and arthropod-borne pathogens infecting humans worldwide.  The class will stress the biology, transmission dynamics, prevention and control of these organisms. 
  • BIOM 250N - Microbiology for Hlth Sciences

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.   Infectious diseases, including concepts of virulence, resistance, prevention and control of microbial diseases in the individual and in the community. If laboratory experience is desired, the student may enroll concurrently in BIOM 251. Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOM 251 - Microbiology Hlth Sciences Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring.  Prereq. or coreq., BIOM 250N. Observation of live microorganisms, their characteristics and activities. Experience with microbiological techniques. Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.
  • BIOM 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOM 360 - General Microbiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., CHMY 123 or 143N; Prereq. or coreq., BIOB 260. Microbial structure and function, growth and reproduction, physiology, ecology, genetics, environmental factors, control of microorganisms and sterility, antimicrobial agents, microbial diversity.
  • BIOM 361 - General Microbiology Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq. or coreq., BIOM 360. Basic microbiology procedures and techniques.
  • BIOM 390 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.  Graded credit/no credit.
  • BIOM 400 - Medical Microbiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Microbial structure and functions, pathogenic microorganisms, virology, immunology. Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.
  • BIOM 402 - Medical Bacteriology& Mycology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., BIOM 360, 361.  A study of the pathogenic bacteria and fungi and the diseases they produce.
  • BIOM 403 - Medicl Bacteriolgy & Myclgy Lb

    Credits: 2. Offered spring.  Prereq. or coreq., BIOM 402. Laboratory study of pathogenic bacteria and fungi.
  • BIOM 407 - Clinical Diagnosis

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOM 360-361 or BIOH 365 or BIOM 402/403 (may concur). Principles of blood chemistry, urinalysis, blood banking, serology and other clinical parameters of disease and health.
  • BIOM 408 - Clinical Diagnosis Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq., or coreq., BIOM 407, and BIOM 360-361 or BIOH 365 or BIOM 402/403 (may concur). Clinical diagnostic methods.
  • BIOM 410 - Microbial Genetics

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., BIOM 360 and 361.  The molecular genetics of prokaryotic organisms including: structure and replication of the prokaryotic chromosome; gene expression; mutagenesis and DNA repair; plasmids and other tools of genetic engineering; transmission of genetic material and recombination in prokaryotes; regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes; recombinant DNA and biotechnology.
  • BIOM 411 - Exprmntl Microbial Genetcs Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq. or coreq., BIOM 410. Experiments in microbial genetics: Analysis of genes and genomes.
  • BIOM 415 - Microbial Dvrsty Eclgy & Evltn

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260, 272, BIOM 360-361 or consent of instr. A broad overview of the physiological, phylogenetic and genomic diversity and ecology of microorganisms within a framework of general ecological principles.  Focuses on microbial interactions with their environment at the level of the individual, population and community, including intimate associations with plants and animals.  Surveys current methods for studying microbial ecology and diversity in the environment.
  • BIOM 427 - General Parasitology

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. Parasitism as a biological phenomenon, origin of parasitism, adaptations and life cycles, parasite morphology, fine structure, physiology, parasites and their environment.
  • BIOM 428 - General Parasitology Lab

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn. Coreq., BIOM 427. Taxonomy, morphology and identification of parasitic protozoa, helminths and arthropods.
  • BIOM 435 - Virology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260, and either BIOM 360 or BIOM 400. The general nature of viruses, with emphasis on the molecular biology of animal and human viruses. Co-convenes with BIOM 535.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • BIOM 450 - Microbial Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOM 360-361. Microbial structure and function, physiological diversity, microbial metabolism, role of microbial activity in the environment.
  • BIOM 451 - Microbial Physiology Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered autumn. Coreq., BIOM 450. Experimental approaches to analysis of microbial structure, composition and metabolism.
  • BIOM 490 - Adv Undergrad Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., BIOM 360, junior or senior standing and consent of instr.  Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.  Graded credit/no credit.
    Course Attributes:
    • Research & Creative Schlrshp
  • BIOM 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of new courses, experimental offerings of visiting professors, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • BIOM 494 - Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq., senior standing in natural sciences. Recent topics in microbiology and related subjects.
  • BIOM 498 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • BIOM 499 - Undergraduate Thesis

    Credits: 3 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term.  Prereq., senior standing and consent of instr.  Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on undergraduate research for presentation and/or publication.  Student must give an oral or poster presentation at the Biological Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium or a scientific meeting.  Graded credit/no credit.
  • BIOM 502 - Advanced Immunology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn even-numbered years.  Advanced topics and immunological techniques used in modern immunology. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 505 - Advanced Topics in Metagenomics

    Credits: 1. (R-8) The course comprises a study group of four faculty 4-6 graduate students and select advanced undergraduates that meets weekly to consider and discuss advances in the areas of metagenomics and bioinformatics research based on recent publications in the primary literature or on their own research findings. There are no specific course prerequisites, but the course is only appropriate for microbiology and computer science graduate and advanced undergraduate students and requires permission of the instructor for enrollment. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 509 - Advanced Virology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring add-numbered years.  Prereq., BIOM 435 (MICB 420).  Students are presented with research papers that have been pivotal to the understanding of important molecular or genetic concepts in virology. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 535 - Advanced Virology

    Credits: 3. Coreq., BIOB 596. A “principles-based” discussion of virology, focusing on the molecular processes and events that must be completed by all viruses for successful replication within an individual host, and spread through host populations. The molecular basis of alternative replication strategies, the interactions of viruses with hosts organisms, and how these interactions lead to disease will be presented with examples drawn from a representative set of more well-understood animal viruses. BIOM 535 emphasizes independent, creative, critical thought. Co-convenes with BIOM 435. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • BIOM 540 - Microbial Pathogenesis

    Credits: 3. Offered fall.  Prereq., graduate standing.  Current concepts in pathogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels. Focus is on microbial (virla, bacterial) and genetic factors leading to disease and the host's involvement in the process. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 545 - Adv Topics in Microb Ecol

    Credits: 1. (R-4) Offered every term.  Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Discussion of selected themes of the ecology of microorganisms with a focus on the recent primary literature. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 546 - Experimental Microb Ecol

    Credits: 1. Offered every term.  Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Focus on experimental design, methods, and presentation of experimental results in the area of microbial ecology. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 570 - Intro to Research

    Credits: 1. (R-2) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., graduate standing.  Required course for biochemistry and microbiology graduate students. Instruction in basic research techniques, research equipment and reading in the relevant scientific literature. Students conduct research projects under faculty mentors of their choosing. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1. (R-4) Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instr.  Same as BCH 594. Presentation of current research in biochemistry and molecular biology by senior graduate students, faculty, and invited outside speakers. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., graduate standing. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Prereq., consent of instr. Credit for independent research project unrelated to thesis or dissertation. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 18. (R-18) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., graduate standing, one semester residence. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., master's student in microbiology. Laboratory research for and preparation of a master's thesis. Level: Graduate
  • BIOM 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 20. (R-20) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., doctoral student in microbiology. Laboratory research for and preparation of a doctoral dissertation. Level: Graduate

Biology - Organismal

  • BIOO 101N - Survey MT Wldlife & Habitats

    Credits: 3. Offered online autumn. Prereq., one course in biology. Interpreting biological patterns associated with selected Montana wildlife species, including mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOO 105N - Introduction to Botany

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Introduction to the plant kingdom including anatomy, physiology and ecology.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Lab Course (N)
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • BIOO 320 - General Botany

    Credits: 5. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 170N-171N, 260.  Prereq. or coreq., BIOB 272.  Anatomy, morphology, ecology and physiology of photosynthetic organisms.
  • BIOO 335 - Rocky Mountain Flora

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., one college-level course in Biology or consent of instr. Elements of the evolution, geography and natural affinities of flowering plants. Identification using a manual of native plants of Montana.
  • BIOO 340 - Biology and Mgmnt of Fishes

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272 and either STAT 216 or WILD 240. Diversity, adaptations and ecology of fishes. Analysis and management of fish populations and communities.
  • BIOO 433 - Plant Physiology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., BIOB 260 or consent of the instructor. The molecular, biochemical and biophysical basis of plant function, from the subcellular to the whole organism level.
  • BIOO 434 - Plant Physiology Lab

    Credits: 1. Offered spring. Prereq or coreq., BIOO 433.  Laboratory exercises designed to familiarize students with concepts and techniques in plant physiology.
  • BIOO 462 - Entomology

    Credits: 4. Offered alternate springs. Prereq. or Coreq., BIOB 272. The classification, morphology, anatomy, development, life-history, behavior and ecology of insects.  Labs include identification of major insect groups, internal and external anatomy and student collections.
  • BIOO 470 - Ornithology

    Credits: 4. Offered spring. Prereq. or Coreq., BIOB 272; major of biology, Pre-Wildlife Biology, or Wildlife Biology, and must be of junior or senior standing. The classification, structure, evolution, behavior and ecology of birds.
  • BIOO 475 - Mammalogy

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn. Prereq., BIOB 272. The evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology and ecology of mammals.
  • BIOO 490 - Adv Undergrad Research

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Offered every term. Prereq., junior or senior standing and consent of instr. Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Biology - Systems Ecology

  • BIOS 532 - Ecosystem Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn every other year. Prereq. CHMY 141N or the equivalent. Coreq. CHMY 143N and BCH 111. This course includes the fundamentals of an ecosystem approach to ecological research by emphasizing relationships among physical, chemical, and biotic elements of interactive systems. It will provide a fundamental basis for more advanced Systems Ecology courses (e.g., Limnology, Integrated Systems Ecology, Landscape Genetics, etc.). Level: Graduate
  • BIOS 534 - Integrated Systems Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring semester alternate years. Principles, theories and empirical studies that describe the complex attributes and processes of coupled natural and human systems. Landscape, climate, economic and social change dynamics and processes emphasized. Flagship course of the UM-DBS Systems Ecology Program. Students strongly advised but not required to take BIOS 532 Fundamentals of Ecosystem Ecology prior to this course. Level: Graduate
  • BIOS 594 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq. graduate standing. Presentations by student, faculty, and associates on issues and topics in their field. Level: Graduate
  • BIOS 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Field and laboratory research on, and writing of, a student's masters thesis. Level: Graduate
  • BIOS 699 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 10. (R-10) Field and laboratory research on, and writing of, a student's masters thesis. Level: Graduate

Microbiology

  • MICB 699 - Dissertation

    Credits: 1 TO 20. (R-20) Offered intermittently. Prereq., doctoral student in microbiology. Laboratory research for and preparation of a doctoral dissertation. Level: Graduate

Economics

  • ECNS 101S - Economic Way of Thinking

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  A critical examination of the market mechanism as a social decision-making device to guide the use of a nation's resources. The limitations of these processes in light of current economic problems such as the rise of the large corporation, monopoly, environmental degradation, economic discrimination and the increasing role of the government.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • ECNS 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ECNS 201S - Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits: 3. Offered every term.  The nature of a market economy, economic decisions of the household and firm, competition and monopoly, value and price determination, distribution of income and applied microeconomic topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • ECNS 202S - Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits: 3. Offered every term.  Prereq., ECNS 201S.  The determination of the level of national economic activity, inflation, economic instability, the role of money and financial institutions, and selected topics in public economic policy.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • ECNS 217X - Issues in Economic Development

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ECNS 201S. Study of the processes of economic growth and development in the less developed world.
    Course Attributes:
    • Cultural Intl Diversity (X)
  • ECNS 301 - Intermediate Micro with Calc

    Credits: 3. Offered spring and  autumn.  Prereq., ECNS 201S and M 162 or equiv. Analysis of consumer behavior, production, factor pricing, externalities and public goods.
  • ECNS 302 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring.  Prereq., ECNS 202S.   Analysis of national income determination, unemployment, and inflation with emphasis on the role of fiscal and monetary policy.
  • ECNS 310 - Intro Health Economics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., economics course. Survey of market forces that govern the production and consumption of medical care in the U.S. market; uncertainty, asymmetric information, and concentrations of market power resulting in inefficient outcomes. Topics include cost escalations, role of medical insurance, and problems of an aging population.
  • ECNS 312 - Labor Economics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 201S. Economic analysis of labor markets. Theories of wage determination, discrimination and poverty with implications for manpower policy.
  • ECNS 313 - Money and Banking

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 202S. Definition and role of money; banks and other financial institutions as suppliers of money; the federal reserve system as a regulator of money; monetary theories, history, and policy.
  • ECNS 320 - Public Finance

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 201S. Rationale for governmental expenditure; public goods; public choice. Analysis of expenditure policy. Intergovernmental relations.
  • ECNS 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ECNS 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., six credits in economics and consent of instr. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ECNS 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements within the business community. The student must complete a learning agreement with a faculty member, relating the placement opportunity to his or her field of study. The department will determine the number of credits to be earned for the experience based upon the activities outlined in the learning agreement. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. The department has determined that credit for this course cannot count in the 36 credit minimum requirement for the major. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ECNS 403 - Introduction to Econometrics

    Credits: 4. Offered autumn.  Prereq., an introductory statistics course.  Quantitative methods in economics with emphasis on regression analysis.
  • ECNS 405 - Game Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered every other autumn.  Prereq., ECNS 201S. An introduction to the tools of game theory and how they are applied.  In many real-world economic situations, outcomes are jointly determined where one agent's choices will affect another's welfare, and vice versa.  Game theory provides a method of analyzing these economic situations where decisions are interrelated, and each agent recognizes this fact and thus makes decisions strategically.
  • ECNS 406 - Industrial Organization

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 201S.  The theoretical basis for public policy solutions to market power. Emphasis on case studies in matters of antitrust, regulation of public utilities, and public ownership of business enterprises.
  • ECNS 431 - International Trade

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ECNS 201 or consent of instr. International trade: theory, policy, institutions, and issues. Analysis of comparative advantage and trade restrictions, negotiations, and agreements.
  • ECNS 433 - Economics of the Environment

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 201S. Outlines a theoretical framework for the analysis of environmental problems, including concepts of market failure and externalities, materials balance and property rights. The policy implications of this analytical model are explored for a range of topics including pollution and the preservation of natural environments and species.  Formally cross-listed with EVST 440.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • ECNS 445 - Int Env Econ & Clim Change

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn every other year. Same as CCS 445. Prereq., ECNS 201S. An introduction to the economics of various policy approaches towards climate change and other international environmental issues such as trans-boundary pollution problems, international trade and the environment and pollution haven hypothesis.
  • ECNS 450 - Adv. Topics in Economic Dev.

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., ECNS 201S and ECNS 202S, or consent of instructor.  Advanced treatment of the processes of economic growth and development in the less developed world.
  • ECNS 451 - Behavioral and Experimental Economics

    Credits: 3. Prereq., ECNS 201. An overview of experimental economics and behavioral economics. Outlines methods and instruments frequently used in economics experiments. Experimental design and assessment. Risk aversion, prospect theory, preference stability, and altruism.
  • ECNS 488 - Res Meth & Thesis Design

    Credits: 2. Offered autumn.  Prereq., senior standing, economics major. Development of senior thesis proposal; presentation of research topics and methods by economics faculty and seminar participants.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ECNS 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ECNS 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., 12 credits in economics and consent of instr.
  • ECNS 494 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 2. Offered spring.  Prereq., senior standing, economics major. Capstone course for economics majors.  Advanced topics in economic methodology, theory and/or public affairs.
  • ECNS 499 - Senior Thesis/Capstone

    Credits: 2. Offered spring. Prereq., senior standing, economics major.  Completion of senior thesis; presentation of results by seminar participants.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ECNS 501 - Graduate Research

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring.  Directed individual research and study appropriate to the back ground and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • ECNS 511 - Microeconomic Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Prereq., ECNS 301. Advanced theoretical treatment of consumer and producer behavior. Level: Graduate
  • ECNS 513 - Macroeconomic Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Prereq., ECNS 302. Advanced theoretical treatment of national income determination, unemployment and inflation. Level: Graduate
  • ECNS 560 - Advanced Econometrics

    Credits: 4. Offered spring.  Prereq., ECNS 403. Advanced quantitative methods in econometrics. Coverage of probit-logit regression models, simultaneous equation system, and other specialized techniques. Level: Graduate
  • ECNS 569 - Empirical Research Design

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered every term.  Role and scope of empirical research. Planning and conduct of a research project. Level: Graduate
  • ECNS 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ECNS 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • ECNS 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently.  Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience that provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ECNS 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-9) Offered every term. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Creative Writing

  • CRWR 115L - Montana Writers Live

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered autumn. Open to all majors. An introduction to Montana’s practicing creative writers and their work through reading, live performances and discussion. Regional poets and prose writers will read from their work and lead class discussion. Students prepare questions developed from readings and criticism.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • CRWR 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 212A - Intro Nonfiction Workshop

    Credits: 3. A study of the art of nonfiction through reading and responding to contemporary nonfiction and the writing of original nonfiction works. Focus is on creative expression, writing technique and nonfiction forms. Students begin with writing exercises and brief essays, advancing to longer forms as the semester progresses.
    Course Attributes:
    • Expressive Arts Course (A)
  • CRWR 234 - The Oval: Literary Mag

    Credits: 3. This course is open to undergraduates who have completed at least one semester of creative writing. Students focus on the editing, design, layout and marketing of The Oval, University of Montana's undergraduate literary magazine. Students will read, discuss and develop responses to to recongnized literary works, as well as developing criteria for each volume's content and design. The class will include the evaluation and selection of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art submissions to The Oval. Students are required to keep a reading journal, and compile a portfolio of writing exercises, responses to texts and critiques of published works.
  • CRWR 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • CRWR 310 - Intermediate Fiction Workshop

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., completion of CRWR 210A with a "B" average or better. An intermediate fiction writing workshop. Students will be expected to finish 3 or 4 substantial stories for the course. Although some outside material will be considered, the primary emphasis will be analysis and discussion of student work.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 311 - Intermediate Poetry Workshop

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., Completion of CRWR 211A with a "B" average or better. An intermediate workshop involving critical analysis of students' work-in-progress as well as reading and discussion of poems in an anthology. Numerous directed writing assignments, experiments, exercises focused on technical considerations like diction, rhythm, rhyme, and imagery.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 312A - Interm Nonfiction Workshop

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Prereq., completion of CRWR 212A or CRWR 210A with a "B" average or better. An intermediate nonfiction workshop. Students read and respond to model essays, in addition to creating and revising original essays for workshop review. Assignments and exercises focus on writing craft and research techniques.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Expressive Arts Course (A)
  • CRWR 320 - The Art and Craft of Revision

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered spring. Prereq., CRWR 210A or consent of instr. An intermediate writing course focused on revision of prose works-in-progress and study of narrative, plot, and editing at the language level. Materials include craft manuals, contemporary and classic examples, and student manuscripts.
  • CRWR 322 - Techniques of Modern Essay

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr.  Study of various forms of nonfiction essay, such as memoir, personal essay, travel and nature writing, profile and literary journalism.  Assignments and exercises focus on writing craft and research techniques.
  • CRWR 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services Office.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • English Course
  • CRWR 410 - Advanced Fiction Workshop

    Credits: 2 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. An advanced writing workshop in which student manuscripts are read and critiqued. Rewriting of work already begun (in CRWR 310 classes) will be encouraged.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 411 - Advanced Poetry Workshop

    Credits: 2 TO 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. An advanced writing workshop involving critical analysis of students' work-in-progress, as well as reading and discussion of poems by established poets. Discussions will focus on structure and stylistic refinement, with emphasis on revision. Different techniques, schools and poetic voices will be encouraged. Frequent individual conferences.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 412 - Advanced Nonfiction Workshop

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. An advanced creative writing workshop focused primarily on reading and writing nonfiction; some classes may focus on personal essay, narrative nonfiction or short forms.  Students complete two substantial essays.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 425 - Storytelling

    Credits: 3. This course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students, and is not limited to English majors. In-class exercises and out-of-class assignments are designed to help students identify, develop, and demonstrate effective narrative practices in their chosen fields. Students learn to recognize and identify unifying themes, motifs, and ideas in literature and oral stories. Students will read, write, edit and present stories to the class, as well as providing a critique of their peers' work.
  • CRWR 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered Intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair, and junior or senior standing. Special projects in creative writing. Only one 492 may be taken per semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 496 - Service Learning

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair, and junior or senior standing. Special projects in creative writing. Only one 496 may be taken per semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • English Course
  • CRWR 510 - Fiction Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 511 - Poetry Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 512 - Nonfiction Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., consent of instr. A creative writing workshop focused primarily on personal essay and narrative nonfiction. Attention given to writing and publishing professional magazine essays. Students complete two substantial essays. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 513 - Techniques of Nonfiction

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered once every 2 years. Prereq., consent of instr. Study of form, technique and style in contemporary nonfiction. Level: Graduate
  • CRWR 514 - Techniques of Modern Fiction

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Intensive reading of contemporary prose writers. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 515 - Traditional Prosody

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Intensive practice and readings in prosodic and other poetic techniques. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 516 - Topics in Creative Writing

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Creative Writing faculty explore readings in their genres of specialty. Each professor chooses the focus, reading list, and assignments for the course. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • CRWR 596 - Graduate Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and Associate Chair. Special projects in creative writing. Only one 596 permitted per semester. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
    • English Course
  • CRWR 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-+) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services Office. Level: Gradaute
  • CRWR 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered every term. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course

English - Linguistics

  • ENLI 465 - Structure of Eng for Tchrs

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as LING 465. The development of the English language from a historical perspective contrasted with the phonological and grammatical structure of English from a modern linguistic point of view, specifically designed for teachers.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course

English as a Second Language

  • ENSL 195 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course

English - English Teaching

  • ENT 296 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair. Special projects in English teaching. Only one 296 may be taken per semester. Course Attributes: English Course.
  • ENT 395 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services office. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Internship graduation limit 6
  • ENT 439 - Studies in Young Adult Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Reading of representative texts covering the history, genres, authors, and themes of literature for students in middle school and high school.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 440 - Teaching Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq. or coreq., EDU 202. Emphasis on teaching writing in grades 5-12. Research about development and maturity of writers, overview of schools of writing/history of writing instruction, strategies for teaching writing as a process, elements of writing craft, criteria for assessing and responding to writing, peer-coaching methods, writing/reading workshops, the role of grammar in improving writing, writing/reading connections, assignment characteristics, and grading practices. Required of students pursuing secondary English major and minor teaching licenses.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 441 - Tchg Rdng & Literature

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq. or Coreq., ENT 439, EDU 395. Emphasis on various approaches to teaching reading and literature in grades 5-12. Research about the development and maturity of readers, strategies for teaching reading comprehension and vocabulary, strategies for diagnosing reading abilities and criteria for reading assessment, reading workshops/literature circles. Emphasis on various approaches to teaching literature: genre, inquiry, thematic, chronological and interdisciplinary. Includes techniques for developing responses to fiction, nonfiction, prose, poetry, film and other media. Focus on the design of lesson plans and curriculum using traditional/classic, contemporary, young adult, and multicultural literature in grades 5-12. Required of students pursuing secondary English major and minor teaching licenses.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 442 - Tchg Oral Lang & Media Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq. or coreq.., LING 465, EDU 395. Emphasis on preparation, implementation, and evaluation of teaching strategies and materials in grades 5-12. Includes learning objectives, teaching and learning styles, unit plans, print and non-print media, and creative drama. Explores student-centered curriculum, with emphasis on developmental abilities in speaking, listening and viewing, and multigenre/multimodal communication. Required of students pursuing secondary English major and minor teaching licenses.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 495 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 496 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair, and junior or senior standing. Special projects in English teaching. Only one 496 may be taken per semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 542 - Theor/Pedagog of Rhet/Comp

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Exploration of contemporary theories and practical strategies for teaching rhetoric and composition grades 5-16. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 543 - Adv Tchg Strat Yng Adv Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Selecting, reading, teaching, and evaluating young adult literature. Design of thematic units with emphasis on students' responses to literature. Presentation of multicultural literature, gender inquiry, social justice, censorship, and media issues. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 544 - Creative Drama English Class

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Designing, teaching and evaluating creative drama in the English language arts classroom. Emphasis on using creative drama as a learning strategy to teach literature and all the language arts. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 545 - Theor/Pedagog of Literacy

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Exploration of contemporary theories and practical strategies for teaching reading, literacy grades 5-16. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 546 - Literary Crit for Teachers

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Emphasis on a variety of theories which focus on reader responses. Application of theories to different genres. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 547 - Adv Tchg Strat Wrtg & Rdg

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Current research and best practices in teaching writing and reading in all content areas. Emphasis on writing and reading processes, workshops, conferences and portfolios. National and state standards, curriculum, and assessments in writing and reading are addressed. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 548 - Portfolios and Assessment

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Selecting, designing, and evaluating informal and formal assessments in English Language Arts. Exploration of portfolios as assessment strategies that align standards curriculum and instruction. Focus on content and performance standards, evaluation criteria and rubrics, and role of reflection in teaching and learning. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 550 - Montana Writing Project

    Credits: 9. Offered summer. Prereq., special application and consent of director. Intensive program designed to increase the effectiveness of the teaching and learning of writing in all levels of education in Montana. For graduate students, preK-120 teachers in all content areas and university level educators. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 552 - MWP Leadership Training

    Credits: 7. Offered intermittently. Prereq., special application, and consent of director. Intensive leadership training for Montana Writing Project teacher-consultants to organize professional development institutes and to developing curriculum and providing mentorship through MWP. For graduate students, preK-20 teachers in all content disciplines and university level educators. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 553 - Native Voices & Writing

    Credits: 7. Offered summer at Blackfeet Community College. Focus is on writing across the curriculum in the context of participants’ teaching assignments alongside the essential component of Niitsitapi (Blackfeet) culture and ways of knowing. Participants develop a theoretical articulation of what it means to write in their disciplinary area(s) of endorsement and with predominantly Blackfeet students. Participants design and critique writing curriculum and instruction in their disciplines with attention to theory and research on writing in the content areas and Blackfeet ways of knowing. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 556 - IEFA & Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently in partnership with Montana Writing Project and local school districts. Prereq., consent of instr. This course assumes that writing is an ideal vehicle for moving forward with implementation of Montana law Indian Education for All (IEFA) in K-12 schools. The primary goal of this course is to help teachers of all grade levels and content areas develop the knowledge, resources, and confidence to enable them to integrate IEFA smoothly into their existing literacy curriculum. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 557 - The Holocaust and IEFA

    Credits: 3. Prereq., special application and Consent of Instr. This course, intended for K-12 and college/university educators, is a collaboration between Montana Writing Project and the Holocaust Educators’ Memorial to examine curricula and pedagogies for linking Holocaust Education and Indian Education for All through writing and literacy education. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 593 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 4. (R-4) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. Pedagogical paper for the Master of Arts in English (Teacher Option). Credit not allowed toward any other degree. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 596 - Graduate Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair. Special projects in English teaching. Only one independent study permitted per semester. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • ENT 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services office. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • FILM 103L - Introduction to Film

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. The history and development of the film medium. Emphasis on critical analysis of selected classic or significant films.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • FILM 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently.  Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FILM 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FILM 300 - History of Film

    Credits: 3. Offered every year. Prereq., FILM 103L, LIT 270L. Survey of film history.
  • FILM 320 - Shakespeare and Film

    Credits: 3. Same as LIT 327. Offered once a year. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. A survey of selected Shakespeare plays emphasizing close reading of the texts and consideration of their dramatic possibilities in relation to film.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • FILM 327 - Film Genres

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered every other year. Prereq. FILM 103L. Intensive study of central works within one major film genre.
  • FILM 363 - The French Cinema

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. An historical, aesthetic, and critical survey of the French cinema, from its beginnings in 1895 through the contemporary cinema (Muet, classical, Realism, Nouvelle Vogue, etc.) with an introduction to contemporary film criticism. Students taking the course for French credits are required to do research, reading, and writing in the French language.
  • FILM 365 - Latin Amer Civ Thru Lit & Film

    Credits: 3. Offered in autumn odd-numbered years. The development of the traditional society of Latin American civilization through the interaction of European, Indian and African elements.
  • FILM 381 - Studies in the Film

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., FILM 103L or consent of instr. Studies in genres, directors, movements, problems, etc.
  • FILM 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • FILM 392 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered Intermittently. Consent of Instructor Required.
  • FILM 447 - Film Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. This course examines key approaches to film theory and criticism, and the theoretical roots of each. Classic and contemporary films will be assessed in the light of the theories covered.
  • FILM 481 - Advanced Studies in Film

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered every other year.  Studies in film aesthetics, politics of  film, international cinema and comparative film analyses.
  • FILM 484 - Film Directors

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered every year. Prereq. FILM 103L. Intensive study of the life and work of one major film director.
  • FILM 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics
  • FILM 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Pereq., consent of instr. and department chair, and junior or senior standing. Special Projects in film. Only one 492 may be taken per semester.
  • FILM 495 - Practicum

    Credits: 1 TO 6. R-6
  • FILM 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair. Special projects in film. Level: Graduate

Irish

  • IRSH 101 - Elementary Irish/Gaelic

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Same as ENIR 101. This course represents an introduction to modern Irish in both its spoken and written forms: basic principles of grammar and sentence structure are covered. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles in every-day situations. This course is housed in the English Department. The GenEd Foreign Language requirement can be fulfilled by successful completion of 101, 102 and 103.
  • IRSH 102 - Elementary Irish II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Same as ENIR 102. The primary objective of this course is to build on the foundations laid in Elementary Irish I. Students will expand their vocabulary with a special focus on verbs; they will also engage new themes that demand a corresponding increase in their store of nouns, adjectives, idioms and expressions. This course is housed in the English Department. The GenEd Foreign Language requirement can be fulfilled by successful completion of 101, 102 and 103.
  • IRSH 103 - Elementary Irish III

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Same as IRSH 103. The primary objective of this course is to build on the foundations laid in Beginning Irish I. Students will expand their vocabulary with a special focus on verbs; they will also engage new themes that demand a corresponding increase in their store of nouns, adjectives, idioms and expressions. The GenEd Foreign Language requirement can be fulfilled by successful completion of 101, 102 and 103.
  • IRSH 201 - Intermediate Irish I

    Credits: 3. Offered spring semester. Prereq. ENIR 101, 102, and 103 or their equivalent from another university. Students will continue their study of the verbs; engage more complex syntax and grammatical constructions; and consult the prose and poetry of the written and oral literary traditions.  For proficiency equal to the 202-level, students must take the five semester sequence (101, 102, 103, 201, & 202) of Irish language study.  
  • IRSH 202 - Intermediate Irish II

    Credits: 3. Offered fall semester. Prereq. IRSH 201 or its equivalent from another university. Students will expand their knowledge of Irish language verbs: they will study the five declensions of the nouns; and acquire the vocabulary and language necessary to engage more abstract ideas and topical issues on an intellectual level.  For proficiency equal to the 202-level, students must take the five semester sequence (101, 102, 103, 201, & 202) of Irish language study. 
  • IRSH 345L - Literature in the Irish Lang

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. This course acknowledges Irish as the oldest documented vernacular in Europe and its literature as a voice that is over 1500 years old. Examines the literary response of Gaelic Ireland to invasion, conquest, and colonization as articulated by its literature.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • IRSH 360 - Irish/N Irish Literature

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Examines (in English) selection of fiction, poetry, drama, film, and music from the Irish and/or Northern Irish literary traditions. Students will seek to understand how artists respond to the burdens of history, identity, and political conflict, and how they articulate the possibilities afforded by Ireland’s changing position in the world.
  • IRSH 380 - Topics in Irish Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. A rotating variety of special topics in Irish Studies, including Irish and Irish-American cinema, major Irish/N. Irish authors, Irish cultural studies, and transatlantic and comparative studies.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • IRSH 391 - Special topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics;
  • IRSH 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics;

English - Literature

  • LIT 110L - Intro to Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Study of how readers make meaning of texts and how texts influence readers. Emphasis on interpreting literary texts: close reading, critical analysis and effective writing.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 120L - Poetry

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. An introduction to the techniques of reading and writing about poetry with emphasis on the lyric and other shorter forms.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 201 - Intro to Literary Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Introduction to the field of literary studies, to the conventions of literary analysis, and to the literature option for English majors. Reading, writing, and research skills will be stressed, along with interpretative approaches to major genres within the field.
  • LIT 202L - The Environmental Imagination

    Credits: 3. Course is designed to introduce students to the many discourses of nature. In this course we will approach “natural history” as a complex literary genre grounded in personal experience of the “more-than-human” world (in David Abram’s now ubiquitous phrase). While the study of natural history writing has historically focused on authors like Gilbert White, Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and John Burroughs (as prominent practitioners of the personal narrative essay that explores the natural world), a more thorough understanding of the genre requires consideration of the role race, class, and gender play in shaping discourses of nature. Further, consideration of non-Anglo-American traditions (including, for example, a range of Native American and Asian “literary” practices) expands our understanding of those traditions as it allows us to see the Anglo-American tradition in useful perspective.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 210L - American Lit I

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Representative texts from the pre-colonial period through the Civil War.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 211L - American Lit II

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Representative texts from the Civil War to the present.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 220L - Brit Lit: Med to Renaissance

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Representative texts from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Renaissance.
    Course Attributes:
    • Literary & Artistic Stds Crse
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 221L - Brit Lit: Enlightenment to Rom

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Representative texts from the seventeenth through the eighteenth century.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • LIT 222L - Brit Lit: Victorian to Contemp

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Representative texts from the early nineteenth century to the present.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
    • Democracy and Citizenship (Y)
  • LIT 270L - Film & Lit

    Credits: 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Studies of the relationship between film and literature. Topics vary.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • LIT 280L - Ecology of Literature

    Credits: 3. Literary study of nature writing and other genres introducing an ecocritical perspective, with revolving Anglophone texts.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • LIT 291 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • LIT 300 - Literary Criticism

    Credits: 3. Offered every term. Prereq. or coreq., 12 credits of lower-division English courses. Study of various literary theories and their application to literary texts.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 301 - Studies in Literary Forms

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Reading of various authors from different literary periods and cultures working in the same mode of composition (courses offered under this rubric may include Literature of Place, Modern Drama, 19th Century Fiction, 20th Century Fiction, Lyric Poetry, Science Fiction, Autobiography; less frequently, Travel Literature, Popular Fiction, Epic, Tragedy, Satire, Romance, Comedy).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 304 - U.S. Writers of Color

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Selected readings from African American, Asian American, Chicano/a, Latino/a, and Native American literatures.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 305 - Lit by & About Native Amer

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., three credits of lower-division LIT courses and NASX 105H or 235X. Same as NASX 340. Selected readings from Native American literature with special emphasis on the literature of writers from the Rocky Mountain west.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 314 - The American Novel

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 210L or 211L and prereq. or co-req., LIT 300. Examination of a selection of American novels in their historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Exploration of literary movements such as realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. Discussion of critical theories and application to the texts.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 315 - Voices of the Am Renaissance

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 210L or 211L and LIT 300 or consent of instr. Perspectives on antebellum Native American, African American, and gender issues. Study of the poetry of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson in light of these three perspectives.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 316 - Topics in Postcolonial Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 210L or 211L and LIT 300.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 327 - Shakespeare

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. A survey of selected Shakespeare plays emphasizing close reading of the texts and consideration of their dramatic possibilities.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 331 - Major Author/s

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Intensive study of the life and works of one author writing in English (courses offered under this rubric have included Chaucer, Milton, Faulkner, Joyce, Twain; less frequently, Conrad, Hemingway, Blake, Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Welty).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 332 - Topics in Modernism

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. An introductory study of European and American modernism. Detailed exploration of major modernist novels and/or poems in relation to broader cultural and social contexts.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 342 - Montana Writers

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 210L or 211L. Examination of poems, stories, and novels by or about Montanans and the treatment and representation of race, place, class, gender, sexuality, and identity in Montana. Exploration of the myths and realities of Montana and the American West.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 343 - African American Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Selected works by African-American authors. Course may define a narrowed focus such as poetry, women writers, etc.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 344 - Asian American Literature

    Credits: 3. This course introduces both a variety of writings by Asian North American authors and major critical issues concerning the production and reception of Asian American texts, with an emphasis on the relation between literary forms and the Asian American socio-historical context, and on the historical formation of Asian American identities.
  • LIT 349L - Medieval Lit

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Exploration of literature from the medieval period, focusing on the major cultural and intellectual influences on the emergence of vernacular writing. Topics will vary, but will regularly include Anglo-Saxon literature and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • LIT 350L - Chaucer

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Critical reading of Chaucer's masterpiece, the Canterbury Tales, with attention to Chaucerian irony, the author's place in literary history, and issues in Chaucer studies.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
  • LIT 351 - Donne & His Followers

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Close study of John Donne and other early 17th century religious poets within the context of Renaissance intellectual history.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 353L - Milton

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Selected study of poetry and prose of Milton.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 355 - British Romanticism

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq. or co-req., LIT 300. Introduction to the major texts, themes, and authors of British literature from 1790-1815, focusing on poets such as Blake, Barbauld, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and P.B. Shelley but attending also to prose writers from Austen to Mary Shelley.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 363 - Modern Poetry

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Survey of modern poetry in English beginning with Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman and moving toward the present, centering on modernist poets.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 369 - Short Fiction

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instructor. Study of selected short stories and novellas from mid-19th century to the present.
  • LIT 370 - Science Fiction

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Study of the science fiction genre from its pulp magazine beginnings in the 1920s to the present.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 373 - Lit & Environment

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., LIT 210L or 211L (ENLT 224L or 225L) and LIT 300 (ENLT 301) or consent of instr. Study of major texts and issues in American nature writing.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 375 - Literary History

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Study of influences on and innovations in the works of various authors within a particular literary historical period in England or America (e.g. British Renaissance, 18th century, Victorian, British Modern, American Puritanism, American Realism and Naturalism; 17th century).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 376 - Lit & Oth Disciplines

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., nine credits in LIT or LSH or consent of instr. Selected works of literature studied in conjunction with works of art, music, religion, philosophy, or another discipline (e.g. Film and Literature, Modernism, Literature and Science, Bible as Literature, Song).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 378L - Gay and Lesbian Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Prereq., LIT 300 or consent of instr. Review of the history of the gay and lesbian movement in the twentieth century as a basis for understanding the political, social, and sexual issues that influenced homoerotic cultural representation in plays, films, and novels.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Upper-Division
  • LIT 379L - Gender & Sexuality in Eng. Fic

    Credits: 3. Offered alternate years. Same as LSH 327L. Major 20th century novels and short stories written in English in different parts of the world and how these texts explore changing concepts of gender and sexuality.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Literary & Artistic Stds Crse
  • LIT 380 - Literary Approaches to Drama

    Credits: 3. This course introduces students to dramatic literature, with an emphasis on dramatic elements and devices, and the continuity in the history/tradition of drama. Topics vary, determined by the instructor's special interests, and might focus on either US, British, or global drama.
  • LIT 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 398 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services office. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LIT 402 - Literature in Place

    Credits: 3. This course gives students a set of advanced learning opportunities to engage with Anglophone texts on the general theme of nature and culture, applying an ecocritical lens to extended literary analysis. Drawing from various periods and from various trans-Atlantic national literatures, the course is designed to focus on the emerging critique of nature and culture that questions foundational structures of epistemology and economy, animate and inanimate, civilization and wilderness.
  • LIT 420 - Critical Theory

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., LIT 300 and six credits in literature courses numbered 300 or higher or consent of instr. Study and application of one or more theoretical approaches to interpreting texts (e.g., aesthetic post-structural, new historicist, classical, Renaissance, Romantic, narrative, psychoanalytic, formalist, neo-Marxist, feminist, gender, cultural studies and reader-response theory).
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 421 - History of Criticism & Theory

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn or spring. Prereq., LIT 300 and six credits in literature courses numbered 300 or higher or consent of instr. Survey of the historical development of critical theories which shaped ways of reading and writing from Plato and Aristotle to the present.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 422 - Ecocritical Theory & Practice

    Credits: 3. Prereq., or coreq., LIT 300. This course surveys the developing field of ecocriticism, introducing students to the major issues and methodologies entailed in the study of literature and the environment.
  • LIT 430 - Studies in Comparative Lit

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of instr. Same as LSH 342. The study of important literary ideas, genres, trends and movements. Credit not allowed for the same topic in more than one course numbered 430, LSH 342.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and department chair, and junior or senior standing. Special projects in literature. Only one independent study may be taken per semester. Consent must be obtained prior to enrollment.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 494 - Seminar: Lit Capstone

    Credits: 3. (R 9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., LIT 300 and nine credits in literature courses numbered higher than 300. Required for completing the English literature option, this seminar will allow students to conduct advanced studies in literary figures and topics chosen by faculty to engage a broad range of interests. A long research paper is required.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • LIT 499 - Thesis/capstone: Honors

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of chair. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 500 - Intro to Graduate Studies

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Instruction in advanced literary and cultural theory, library and research skills, and academic genres. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 502 - Topics in Ecocriticism

    Credits: 3. This course is a central requirement for the English Department's graduate option in Ecocriticism. The course will vary by topic, but will link introductions to ecocritical theory with practice as it models how to apply ecocritical theory to the study of literature. Each offering will explore the interconnections between nature and culture, through the cultural artifacts language and literature. Although changing with the topic, in most cases the course considers the role race, class, and gender play in shaping discourses of nature. Further, consideration of non-Anglo-American traditions will be featured for many offerings. Level: Graduate
  • LIT 520 - Sem in British Lit

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered every autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate status or consent of instructor. Topics will vary. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 521 - Sem American Lit

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate status or consent of instr. Topics will vary. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 522 - Sem Comparative Lit

    Credits: 3. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Same as MCLG 522.  Prereq., graduate status or consent of instructor. Topics will vary. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 524 - Nature, Language and Politics

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Investigation of environmental, social and political thought from the perspective of contemporary language theory. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • LIT 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LIT 596 - Graduate Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and chair. Special projects in literature. Only one 596 permitted per semester. Consent must be obtained prior to enrollment. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study
  • LIT 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of faculty supervisor, department chair, and the Internship Services office. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • LIT 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered every term. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course

Writing

  • WRIT 101 - College Writing I

    Credits: 3. UM: Offered every term. Prereq., WRIT 095 or proof of passing score on writing diagnostic examination, referral by WRIT 095 instructor-SAT writing score at or above 440, MUSWA at or above 3.5, SAT/ACT essay score at or above 7, or ACT Combined English/Writing score at or above 18. Expository prose and research paper; emphasis on structure, argument, development of ideas, clarity, style, and diction. Students expected to write without major faults in grammar or usage. Credit not allowed for both WRIT 101 and COM 101. Grading A-F, or NC (no credit). MC: Offered every term. Prereq., WRIT 095 or proof of appropriate SAT/ACT essay, English/Writing, writing section scores, appropriate MUSWA scores, or proof of passing scores on Writing Placement Exam). Expository prose and research paper; emphasis on structure, argument, development of ideas, clarity, style, and diction. Students expected to write without major faults in grammar or usage. Grading A-F, or NC (no credit).
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Introductory
  • WRIT 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • WRIT 198 - Coop Education Experience

    Credits: 1 TO 12. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • WRIT 201 - College Writing II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., placement or C or better in WRIT 101. MUSWA at or above 5.5, SAT/ACT essay at or above 11, a SAT writing section score at or above 700 or a Combined English/Writing portion of the ACT at or above 32.  Designed for first year students with advanced writing ability and students who seek a lower-division writing course. Offers instruction in rhetorical reading and writing, particularly the study and practice of written argumentation in different academic and civic contexts.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
    • Writing Course-Introductory
  • WRIT 391 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • WRIT 398 - Coop Education Experience

    Credits: 1 TO 12. Offered intermittently. Prereq., consent of department. Extended classroom experience which provides practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Prior approval must be obtained from the faculty supervisor and the Internship Services office. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • WRIT 491 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • WRIT 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and chair, and junior or senior standing. Special projects in expository writing. Only one 496 may be taken per semester.
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • WRIT 540 - Tchg Coll Levl Composition

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Restricted to graduate students teaching expository writing at The University of Montana. Theory and pedagogy of teaching college composition are emphasized. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • English Course
  • WRIT 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • WRIT 596 - Grad Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-9) Offered every term. Prereq., consent of instr. and chair. Special projects in expository writing. Only one 596 may be taken per semester. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Independent Study

Environmental Sciences

  • ENSC 105N - Environmental Science

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Provides students with opportunities to use class knowledge to make a difference; helps students build all of the following: scientific literacy; skills in critical thinking, research and self-instruction; an understanding of the scientific basis of environmental issues, policies and laws; habits of sustainable living, scientifically-informed, active participation in social decisions, and service to their community and to the earth.
    Course Attributes:
    • Natural Science Course (N)
  • ENSC 291 - Special Topics/Experimental Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ENSC 360 - Applied Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq or coreq ENST 201. To succeed in this course, students also need college level courses in general biology, chemistry & statistics. Principles and concepts of ecology and how they can be applied to inform real life decisions about human interactions with the environment. Emphasizes the science of sustainability and the conservation of watersheds and biodiversity.
  • ENSC 391 - Special Topics/Exp. Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 12) Offerered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • ENSC 398 - Cooperative Education/Intern

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered autumn and spring. Requires consent of instructor. Practical application of classroom learning through internship with governments, organizations or industry. A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
  • ENSC 491 - Special Topics/Exper Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • ENSC 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Requires consent of instructor. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ENSC 494 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. A seminar on a current environmental topic.
  • ENSC 495 - Field Study

    Credits: 1 TO 10. Offered autumn. Prereq or coreq ENSC 360. Designing, executing, interpreting and documenting field studies. Project oriented.
  • ENSC 501 - Sci Apprchs Environ Prob

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST or consent of instructor. The strength and limitations of the scientific approach to investigating and solving selected environmental problems with an emphasis on the natural sciences. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 540 - Watershed Conservation

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instructor. Course assumes students have level of knowledge presented in a college level ecology course. Integrates watershed science, policy, planning, action and organizing. The science component explores watershed connections, evaluating change and assessing watershed condition. The policy component explains the scientific basis of national, state and local laws, programs and agencies that affect watersheds. The planning and action component discusses developing watershed conservation plans and selecting actions likely to address problems without creating other problems. The organizing component covers how to help watershed communities make choices, resolve conflicts, build commitment and find funding. Students work individually or in teams to assist Montana groups in developing watershed CPR plans, initiating monitoring projects, and/or conducting education projects. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 550 - Pollution Ecology

    Credits: 3. Offered spring even-numbered years. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instructor. Course assumes students have level of knowledge presented in a college level ecology course. Examines sources, fate, and effects of pollutants on organisms and ecosystems; methods of measuring and predicting pollutant fate and effects, assessing and reducing risks, estimating ecosystem assimilation capacity; setting standards and restoring ecosystems damaged by pollution. Briefly examines some relevant laws and policies at the federal, state and local level. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 551 - Environmental Field Study

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-3) Offered intermittently. Prereq. or coreq., ENSC 540 or 550 or ENST 560 or consent of instructor.  Same as BIOB 551.  Designing, executing and interpreting environmental field studies.  Oriented to studies of aquatic systems and watersheds.  Students will assist with a class project and may also pursue their own projects.  Projects focus on the Clark Fork, Bitterroot and Blackfoot River basins. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 593 - Professional Paper

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST and consent of instructor. Preparation of a professional paper appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 594 - Graduate Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 15. (R-15) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. In depth analysis of a current environmental topic. Different topics offered each semester. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 595 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 596 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST and consent of instructor. Work on selected problems by individual students under direct faculty supervision. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 597 - Research

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST and consent of instructor. Directed individual graduate research and study appropriate to background and objectives of the student. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 598 - Internship

    Credits: 1 TO 8. (R-8) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST and consent of instructor. Practical application of classroom learning during placements off campus. Level: Graduate
  • ENSC 599 - Thesis

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST and consent of instructor. Preparation of a thesis or manuscript based on research for presentation and/or publication. Level: Graduate

Environmental Studies

  • ENST 191 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R 9) Offered intermittently. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of current topics.
  • ENST 201 - Environmental Info Resources

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. Students learn how to find, evaluate and use existing information to increase understanding of environmental issues and resolve controversies. Students will research a subject using a variety of sources (refereed literature, government sources, internet sources, interviews); evaluate sources critically; write a literature review and give an oral presentation on their topic. Focus is on critical thinking and dealing with the information explosion.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Intermediate
  • ENST 225 - Community & Environment

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Same as SOCI 225.  Exploration of the ways that communities address their environmental concerns.  Introduction of relevant social science concepts.
  • ENST 230H - Nature and Society

    Credits: 3. UM campus course offered spring. Explores the relationship between ideas about nature and the development of political and social ideas, institutions, and practices, primarily in western (Euro-American) society. Complements ethics offerings in philosophy aimed at environmental studies majors.
    Course Attributes:
    • Hist & Cultural Studies (H)
  • ENST 291 - Spec Topics/Exp Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 9. (R-9) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ENST 294 - Seminar

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. A review and discussion of current research. Topics vary.
  • ENST 310 - Environment Montana: A to Z

    Credits: 3. The environment of Montana has changed dramatically since its founding 150 years ago. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the land, people and places of Montana as viewed through the lens of environmental change. It will explore environmental change in relation to the actions of human beings. It will also explore how federal policies intersect with Montana environmental stories. Through a combination of lectures, readings, focused in-class discussions, and a research project students will learn the environmental stories of Montana.
  • ENST 335L - The Environmental Vision

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn.  Provides background, overview, interpretations, and understanding of key concepts, themes, approaches, and forms in American nature and environmental nonfiction as well as that literature’s response to and influence on environmental events, figures, and movements.
    Course Attributes:
    • Lit & Artistic Studies (L)
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ENST 367 - Envr Politics & Policies

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Foundation in public lands history, bedrock environmental laws, policy processes and institutions.  Research and analysis of current environmental and natural resource policy issues.  Focus is domestic illustrated by case studies.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ENST 373A - Nature Works

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Writing workshop for the creation, critique, and revision of essays about the environment to include natural history, personal narrative, science interpretation, advocacy/editorial, place-based essay, and others. Examination of concepts, forms, and approaches to writing about environmental concerns, awareness and sensitivity. Reading and responding to published work, primarily from the perspective of technique and approach.
    Course Attributes:
    • Expressive Arts Course (A)
    • Writing Course-Upper-Division
  • ENST 382 - Environmental Law

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Introduction to the history, law and theory of environmental regulation in the United States using public and private land regulation mechanisms as case studies.  Basic principles of constitutional and administrative law relevant to environmental regulation, substantive public and private land use law and the history of environmental problems and their regulation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ENST 391 - Special Topics/Exp Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ENST 395 - Field Studies: Env. Studies

    Credits: 2 TO 3. (R-12) Offered every term. Via extended backcountry travel, experiential examination of cultural history and public lands management, and how those affect ecosystem integrity. Investigation of personal roles in and relationships with human and ecological communities. Offered by the Wild Rockies Field Institute and Northwest Connections.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ENST 396 - Supervised Internship (PEAS)

    Credits: 0 TO 10. (R-10) Offered Fall (2 cr.), Spring (2 cr.); Summer intensive, (6 cr.). Students learn small scale sustainable vegetable farming in a hands-on work environment at the PEAS farm (15 minute bike ride from campus). Lectures, readings and reflection inform the work. Summer students also visit local farms on once-a-week field trips. PEAS is repeatable, as the curriculum changes across the season, and students can attend any semester, though the 6 credit summer intensive course is the heart of the program.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
    • Service Learning/Volunteer
    • Service Learning
  • ENST 398 - Cooperative Education/Intern

    Credits: 1 TO 6. Offered autumn and spring. Consent of instructor required. Practical application of classroom learning through internship with governments, organizations or industry.  A maximum of 6 credits of Internship (198, 298, 398, 498) may count toward graduation.
    Course Attributes:
    • Internships/Practicums
  • ENST 410 - TEK of Native Peoples

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Examines traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) of Native peoples with a special focus on ancient peoples of the Northern Great Plains.
  • ENST 420 - US Environmental Movement

    Credits: 3. Offered Intermittently.  Study of the environmental movement as a social movement.  Examination of different approaches to environmental protection and restoration in view of the movement’s historical roots and contemporary debates. 
  • ENST 427 - Social Issues:The Mekong Delta

    Credits: 3. The course focuses on the history, culture, economy and environment of Vietnam, with particular emphasis on the Mekong Delta region. This is achieved through lectures from local professors at Can Tho University, active participation in field trips, the home stay, course readings, and synthesis through questions sets and discussions provided by University of Montana instructor. The goal of this half of the Vietnam study abroad program is to provide an understanding of the unique environments and the socio-economy of the Mekong Delta region to facilitate learning about the effects of climate change on these complex natural and anthropogenic systems. Co-convenes with ENST 514.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • ENST 430 - Culture & Agriculture

    Credits: 3. Offered spring, from start of semester to mid-April.  Surveys treatment of farmers and farming in the humanities.  Course covers specific agricultural crops and their effect on social and environmental history, artistic commentary on agricultural life and farmer philosophy.  Themes range from agriculturally influenced historical events to Wendell Berry's poetry to Albert Borgmann's philosophy.
  • ENST 437 - Climate Change: Mekong Delta

    Credits: 3. This course focuses on the threats posed by climate change in Vietnam, with particular emphasis on the Mekong Delta region. This is achieved through lectures from Can Tho University professors, active participation in field trips, the homestay, course readings, and synthesis through questions sets and discussions provided by University of Montana instructor. The goal of this half of the Vietnam study abroad program is to provide an understanding of the potential impacts of climate change on the ecosystems and people of the Mekong Delta, and explore opportunities for people to adapt to and mitigate these impacts. Co-convenes with ENST 516.
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • ENST 472 - Gen Sci: Conserv Ed

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn and spring. A study of the foundations of environmental science and conservation education with applications to community service and teaching.
  • ENST 476 - Environmental Citizenship

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., open to juniors and seniors only or by consent of instructor. Same as CCS 476. Develops leadership and environmental citizenship skills, values and virtues through student-initiated projects informed by principles of organizing and sustainable behavior change theories of social marketing.
  • ENST 480 - Food, Agriculture, Environment

    Credits: 3. Offered spring.  Exploration of the premise that agricultural sustainability requires practices, policies, and social arrangements that balance concerns of environmental soundness, economic viability, and social justice among all sectors of society.
  • ENST 487 - Globalization, Justice & Envir

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Study of current trends in economic globalization and its effects on efforts to work for social justice and environmental sustainability, particularly in the Global South.  Examination of different models and theories of globalization, analysis of ethical issues raised, and assessment of alternatives proposed.
    Course Attributes:
    • Writing Course-Advanced
  • ENST 489S - Env. Justice Iss & Solut

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Examination of evidence, causes and consequences of social inequality in the distribution of environmental risks and in access to natural resources and environmental amenities. Community, government and industry responses and service approaches for addressing environmental inequities.
    Course Attributes:
    • Social Sciences Course (S)
  • ENST 491 - Special Topics/Exper Courses

    Credits: 1 TO 12. (R-12) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. Experimental offerings of visiting professors, of new courses, or one-time offerings of current topics.
  • ENST 492 - Independent Study

    Credits: 1 TO 6. (R-6) Offered autumn and spring. Consent of instructor required. Course material appropriate to the needs and objectives of the individual student.
  • ENST 493 - Study Abroad: Envir Justice LA

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Two week travel seminar to one or more Latin American countries to examine Latin American perspectives on environmental justice and efforts toward sustainable development within the context of the global economy and U. S. foreign policy. Required one-credit seminar offered spring semester to provide background readings. 
    Course Attributes:
    • Faculty-Led Study Abroad
  • ENST 494 - Seminar/Workshop

    Credits: 1 TO 3. (R-6) Offered intermittently. May be restricted to EVST majors. May require consent of instructor. A seminar on a current environmental topic.
  • ENST 499 - Senior Thesis/Capstone

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., senior standing in EVST. For seniors who want to design and perform a significant capstone project involving research and/or service. Students have responsibility for designing their projects which are subject to faculty approval. A final report and public presentation are required. Honors credit available.
  • ENST 505 - Literature of Nature Writing

    Credits: 3. Offered spring. Prereq., graduate standing. Study of nature, environmental, and place-based writing, with emphasis on the American tradition and its relationship to twenty-first century environmental concerns, challenges, and opportunities, and to the current practice of nature and environmental writing. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 510 - Native American Environmental Issues

    Credits: 3. This graduate readings seminar provides an overview of environmental issues of Native American communities through the 19th to 21st centuries. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 513 - Nat Res Conflict Resolution

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as NRSM 513 and LAW 613. Prereq., graduate standing. Examines the basic framework for preventing and resolving natural resource and environmental conflicts in America. Reviews the history of alternative approaches, emphasizes the theory and practice of collaboration, and considers future trends. This highly interactive course uses lectures, guest speakers, case studies, and simulations. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 514 - Social Issues:The Mekong Delta

    Credits: 3. This course focuses on the history, culture, economy and environment of Vietnam, with particular emphasis on the Mekong Delta region. This is achieved through lectures from local professors at Can Tho University, active participation in field trips, the home stay, course readings, independent graduate research, and synthesis through questions sets and discussions provided by University of Montana instructor. The goal of this half of the Vietnam study abroad program is to provide an understanding of the unique environments and the socio-economy of the Mekong Delta region to facilitate learning about the effects of climate change on these complex natural and anthropogenic systems. Co-convenes with ENST 427. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • ENST 515 - Enviro Negotiation Mediation

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Same as NRSM 515 and COMX 515. Prereq., graduate standing. This course prepares students to effectively engage in multiparty negotiation on natural resource and environmental issues. It is grounded in theory and provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in both negotiation and facilitation/mediation. Guest speakers, case studies, and simulations allow students to develop, test, and refine best practices. The course is fast-paced, highly interactive, and serves as the second of three required courses in the Natural Resources Conflict Resolution Program. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 516 - Climate Change: Mekong Delta

    Credits: 3. This courses focuses on the threats posed by climate change in Vietnam, with particular emphasis on the Mekong Delta region. This is achieved through lectures from Can Tho University professors, active participation in field trips, field data collection, analysis and interpretation, the homestay, course readings, independent graduate research, and synthesis provided by University of Montana professors. The goal of this half of the Vietnam study abroad program is to provide an understanding of the potential impacts of climate change on the ecosystems and people of the Mekong Delta, and explore opportunities for people to adapt to and mitigate these impacts. Co-convenes with ENST 516. Level: Graduate
    Course Attributes:
    • Co-Convened Course
  • ENST 519 - Foundations of Change

    Credits: 3. Designed for the first-year graduate cohort in Environmental Studies, this foundational course aims to strengthen participants’ capacities to effectively meet today’s environmental and social justice challenges. Our incoming cohort (around 20-25 in recent years) includes students from a wide variety of backgrounds. The course provides an introduction to the history and development of the environmental movement(s), as well as a theoretical understanding of democracy, citizenship, power, and social change. Participants will also explore their own sense of personal purpose and develop community. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 520 - Environmental Organizing

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing. Developing understanding of and skills in community and environmental organizing. Emphasis on theory and practice of civic engagement and social change with a focus on developing and running campaigns and working in a group. Team projects. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 521 - Found Environmental Educ

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing in environmental studies. Same as C&I 521. Problem-solving approaches to environmental education; problem identification, research and design and implementation of an educational approach to selected environmental issues. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 530 - The Greening of Religion

    Credits: 3. Offered yearly. A critical examination of different religious traditions' views on nature and society, and contemporary religious traditions' responses to environmental issues. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 535 - Local Climate Solutions

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. This course seeks to develop students’ understanding and skills for participating in local solutions to climate change that can also support broader conservation, efficiency and sustainability efforts. This will be accomplished by engaging in planning and carrying out group projects that further advance existing climate change mitigation or adaptation efforts. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 537 - Bld Effective Environment Org

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently.  Prereq., graduate standing. Focus on the tasks and skills necessary to building and managing effective environmental organizations, particularly non-profit. Budgeting, fund-raising, grant-writing, attracting and utilizing volunteers, working with the media. Strategic approaches and how they are shaped by issue, context, and structure. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 542 - Transboundary Env Issues

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently in autumn.  Prereq., graduate standing in environmental studies program.  Review of the political systems and administrative systems of each country relevant to natural resource policy decision-making and ecological systems. Review pertinent literature, interact with stakeholders, and produce group reports. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 548 - Super Tchg Envir Ed

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., ENST 521 or EDU 521. Design, selection and evaluation of materials for the teaching of environmental education. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 555 - Rsch Methods for Soc Change

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing. Introduction to qualitative methods of research design, data collection, and analysis. Emphasis on research that facilitates and documents social change processes. Hands-on research experience through fieldwork projects. Includes instruction on writing social science and on research ethics. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 560 - Environmental Impact Analysis

    Credits: 3. Offered intermittently. Prereq., graduate standing or consent of instructor. Covers legal and scientific aspects of the Environmental Impact Analysis (EIA) including: What is required by international, national and state law and regulations? How does one organize an effective interdisciplinary team research effort and public participation program? What scientific tools are used in EIA? How could EIA process be improved? Level: Graduate
  • ENST 561 - Land Use Planning Law

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Same as GPHY 561 and LAW 687. Prereq., graduate standing. Basic overview of the law of land use planning including background in the traditional governmental regulatory, proprietary, and fiscal land use tools. Examination of modern techniques for land use planning; consideration of constitutional limits of authority of state and local governments. Focus on skills in interpreting, drafting and applying state legislation and local ordinances. Level: Graduate
  • ENST 563 - Environmental Law I

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST. Same as LAW 650. Philosophy and values underlying environmental regulation, basic introduction to administrative law, in-depth study of air and water pollution and the environmental policy acts.   Level: Graduate
  • ENST 564 - Environmental Law II

    Credits: 3. Offered autumn. Prereq., graduate standing in EVST. Same as LAW 649. In-depth study of the laws addressing toxic substances and solid and hazardous waste, and the Endangered Species Act.  Exploration of interaction between land use regulation and environmental law. Level: Graduate